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  • kenmcc
    replied
    The easiest way is to have valves on your steamer ports, thats what we did an our last tender. Nobody seems to do that though.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue 101
    replied
    If you don't want to take time to take your intake off just turn the piece around and use the capped suction.While it is true pumps are rated for one side suction on short lifts you CAN gain volume by utilizing both suction ports.T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    14-2.4.2*
    The pump manufacturer shall certify that the pump is capable of pumping rated capacity at 150 psi (1035 kPa) net pump pressure at any of the following special conditions when these conditions are specified by the purchaser:
    (1) At an elevation above 2000 ft (610 m)
    (2) At lifts higher than those listed in Table 14-2.4.1(a) or through more than 20 ft (6 m) of suction hose, or both
    (3) For pumps having a rated capacity of 1500 gpm (5678 L/min) or larger, through a single suction hose only, or through the number of hose listed in Table 14-2.4.1(a) attached to one side of the apparatus only

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  • 911WACKER
    replied
    Dalmation90-

    I was not aware of that, the only thing I can remember is reading the chart on suction tubes, I'll have to check my nfpa book agian when I get home.

    Thanks anyway for the input!!!!

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  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    911, just remember that chart doesn't stand alone -- all those suctions have to be off the same side of the truck.

    It's an alternate -- either your full capacity through a single intake, -or- through the size & number listed -as long as- there all on the same side of the truck.

    A typical 1750 mid-mount pump has one intake on the drivers side, one on the passenger so it must be capable to do capacity through a single suction.

    This also explains why most of the pics I've seen of trucks with very large pumps have them rear mounted -- all the suctions come off the back i.e. all off one side.

    Leave a comment:


  • 911WACKER
    replied
    FINALLY SOMEONE ELSE HAD SEEN THAT CHART, I THOUGHT I MUST HAVE BEEN DREAMING.

    BLACKB, THANKS FOR THE HELP>

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    rated
    GPM Suction number lift
    size of suctions
    750 41/2 1 10
    1,000 5 1 10
    1,250 6 1 10
    1,500 6 2 10
    1,750 6 2 8
    2,000 6 2 6
    2,000 8 1 6
    2,250 8 3 6
    2,500 8 3 6
    2,750 8 4 6
    3,000 8 4 6

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  • chief14
    replied
    kenmcc- We are able to switch to tank water without a valve and without unhooking the suction hose. We did it by switching before the level got too low in the folding tank but it does require the pump operator to be careful. It gets ugly if you run out of tank water. As long as you are flowing enough water it won't flow back into the folding tank.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    Had to stop at the station and look up another bit of trivia on the way home, so I opened 1901 while I was at it:

    NFPA 1901 12-2.4.2(c)
    For pumps 1500gpm or larger (shall draft rated capacity)through a single suction hose only, or through the number of hoses listed in Table 12-2.4.1(a) attached to one side of the apparatus only.


    For 1750gpm, that means either a single 6" or 2-6" on the same side of the truck. Don't see many 1750s with dual steamers on the same side of the truck, so they need to make it through a single 6".

    Blackb, now you made me wish I photocopied the chart! But I believe the NFPA standard is to be able to draft with a 2500gpm with 2 8" suctions off the same side. But I could see using 6" day to day since it's probably more manageable for a small crew.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    We just completed pump tests on four 2500 gpm pumps all require 3 - 6 inch suctions at nfpa lift to pass.

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  • ArmyTruckCompany
    replied
    Once again Dalmatian, thanks for the mutual aid!! I was about to explain to 911 that he better tell that to our 1500gpm pump, as last week when I pumped it for the yearly test, I had approx. 1650 blowin' through her. And the statement about no more than 1250 through a 6" no matter the pump size, well son....I am saying here and now, you're just dead, plain wrong!!! I have been driving (career and volunteer) for over 7 years, and have moved up to 2250gpm through a 6' intake.

    911, I am not 100% sure, but I believe that the UL test for all pumpers calls for capacity through 20' of (one single line) at 10' of lift.

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  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    armytruckcompany- even if you connect your suction directly to the pump, a 1750 gpm is rated using to steamers not 1, 1250 gpm is about all you can get through 1 6" regardless of pump size.

    Um, wrong answer. Class A Fire Pumps are rated for assuming a single 20' run of suction with a 10' lift.

    Applies at least up into the 2250gpm class pumps Hale makes.

    If you're only getting 1250 through a 6" suction, better look at the intake size, etc on the pump.

    ------------
    Our 1500gpm pump does 1400gpm -- through 30' 6" of suction, 20' of 6" piping from the front bumper to the pump, a Chicksan swivel, a butterfly valve, and being wyed into 2 -- 3" intakes (couldn't fit a 6" intake where we needed to to support the front suction).

    Add in the 2nd 30' 6" suction to a 6" steamer on the pump (direct on the passenger side, through a PIV at the pump panel) and we get into the 1700gpm range.

    A pump rated at 1750gpm with two 6" suctions should be providing over 2000gpm, unless you have lifts pushing 20' or more.

    Leave a comment:


  • kenmcc
    replied
    What about HYDRA-SHIELD automatic pumper inlet valves?
    Their literature says suctuion hose prime water is retained at the valve when flow is stopped or switched to booster tank ops.
    Can this valve tell when you open your tank to pump, or do you still have to gate off your steamer port?

    Leave a comment:


  • 911WACKER
    replied
    I would have to agree with chief14- its possible but you need draft gaskets on your adapters.

    armytruckcompany- even if you connect your suction directly to the pump, a 1750 gpm is rated using to steamers not 1, 1250 gpm is about all you can get through 1 6" regardless of pump size.

    Leave a comment:


  • kenmcc
    replied
    We live in a ruraL area and we have a very limited number of hydrants in the area, so we truck most of our water in.
    We use port-a-tanks and if you don't have valve on your steamer port, you have to break down the draft to use tank water while waiting for another tender to fill the port-a-tank.
    It really sucks to have to pull your guys out because your out of water, when you have 3000 gallons sitting on the ground!

    Leave a comment:

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