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JUNIORS FIGHTING FIRE

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  • FD55
    replied
    First off I agree that anyone under 18 should not be able to go into a fire.(Also the law here in Colorado) However, I also agree the best way to learn is to do hands on things.You can still get that by just being around a firehouse or taking the classes you need, without entering a fire. I understand how hard it is to wait. Im only 16. But Our time will come.

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  • captstanm1
    replied
    Assistant 16.....you have good points...but..obviously laws are different in each state governing this subject. If the law PERMIST..and in the judgement of the Company Officers and if the person has the certifications....let them do as much as they are allowed. God knows we are all running short staffed as it is.

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  • rudedog
    replied
    capnstan, hides???? come on climb out of your cyberworld and get a grip--what would I be afraid of? A scathing e mail? Or ? If I choose not to post my e mail or profile, thats up to me. And believe it or not,I do have some knowledge on this subject. Of course for you to comment that I don't--you must be able to read my mind. So here goes, Ill think of my e mail address, got it?? Ill be checking my mail. YYYYYYEEEEHHAWWWWWWWW

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  • Assistant 16
    replied
    As an instuctor in NJ I have personally taught many juniors under "controlled" conditions. However, letting them enter burning buildings is pushing the envelope a little too far, (and besides that it's against the law in NJ). There is a time to learn and that is during the early part of your career. I will let juniors in my department take the knob on small fires such as brush or leaves. However I would hate to see my name on the top of a lawsuit for letting a person that is under 18 into a burning building to fight the fire. I also started as a junior and paid my dues. Learned what the equipment was for, how to use it, and how to be a good firefighter. Sometimes you have to sit back and learn before you start fighting fires. This is just my opinion based on my experience and training. Whatever everyone else does is totally up to them, but just remember know what you are getting yourself into before letting a junior into that burning building.

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  • captstanm1
    replied
    Rude Dog Hits and hides.... Not brave enough to let us know where he/she is from....

    As far as sayings either on paper, shirts or your underwear.......well...who cares? As long it is done tastefully what's the problem?

    Did you go to all forums and tell everyone that has some sort of statement in their message that their case is ruined....or did you just happen to pop in here and comment on a topic youhave no knowledge of???

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  • rudedog
    replied
    Towerjunior----you ruin what little case you have with that "if you cant take the heat yada yada" Ya got that on a tee shirt too? And the answer to the riddle was not just 7 years, but seven years of "life experence" - it makes a difference

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  • engine_tower1
    replied
    Engine191 I agree when you start off in the fire service as a junior you should not be allowed to enter any IDLH atmosphere. I am a trained firefighter (now 18) and was one at the age of 16. I went through FFI, FFII, Haz-Mat Ops and Awareness at the age of 16. Yes i did learn some by sitting back and watching everyone else work, but I have learned more by doing. I do not pump the trucks but I do know how to, because I sat through the class given by my station. I do not want to pump a truck yet and do not know everything there is to pumping. I wish you luck in your junior program and hope you learn alot however you may. I am not bashing your post I am just telling you how I feel as a junior member.

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  • Engine 101
    replied
    After reading what some of the people inthis thread have had to say I have to agree with them, They amke very valid points, I myslef am a Junior Firefighter or Explorer or Cadet whatever they are called in your neck of the woods, I agree there should be NO way on earth an explorer should be allowed inside a burning building that endangers the lives of others, Right now the best thing an explorer should be doing is learning, There will come a time once you are a firefighter that you can pump the engine and go inside a burning structure right now watch and learn and don't be afraid to ask questions, And jusr because you are a junior does not give you the right to think you should have a department issued page and does not mean you should be allowed to leave school. Leave that to the expirnced and trained firefighter's

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  • engine_tower1
    replied
    Fireman8 I am so glad that there is finally someone else besides Captstanm that feels the same what the we do. Like you said in this line of work everything is hands on and you only learn by doing, not sitting and watching everyone else preform. I also agree with you on the probationary period, I wasn't allowed to ride on the trucks until I recieved my certs which was like 4 months.

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  • fireman8
    replied
    I do agree that being a junior is a time for learning equip. and procedures. But after a probationary period, I think a junior should get a chance to grab a nozzle,BUT...only under the direct supervision on his officer. To me one of the best ways to learn, is by doing. And if a junior has proven (after ample time) that he can help fight fire, why not let them get their hands dirty. There will be plenty of time for them to roll hoses...right along with everyone else. Isn't the main objective to get the job done as safe and quick as possible......and do it together? I have seen some firefighters want to do the glory work then push the mopping up off on others. It gets done quicker if all the hands work together.

    Just my thoughts....hope it helps a little

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  • captstanm1
    replied
    mediator....very well done with your post... I did neglect to say that Junior members had to have a permission slip signed by the parents and a physical. The end result is that they are valuable and they are protected to a cetain point. But after they receive the certification they are "allowed" to particiapte actively if approved by their department. Your post is very well done and I applaud you.

    In defense of engine_tower1 he is probably too young to remember the story behind the bowling pins... It was done as a joke to see how many people would say "what are they for?" It came from FDIC. While visiting a station there we noticed they had them in therefront bumper with the LDH hydrant hose. We asked, "what for?" The older firefighter there was flabergasted we did not know and accused us of being rookies. He said, "we use em to tighten the hose, what else woudl they be for?" We said, "We use rubber mallets" and his reply was..."hmmmguess that would work!" We came back and immediately put them on (after customizing them) and left them there for a while to see who would comment on them.

    Drop me an email

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  • engine_tower1
    replied
    Mediator I agree with you, I learn something new on every call that I run. I don't know everthing yet and I never will know it all. Yes we used to carry bowling pins on our apparatus, but we have since replaced them with mallets. Where are you from in VA?

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  • mediator
    replied
    Well ive listened and read as long as I can so I'm going to comment any way. First of all as an Instructor from Va I do know that if you are under 18 you have to have a signed permission slip from a parent or guardian before you can participate in any practicle excersises. This means any thing from rolling hose to raising a ladder. If any member junior or senior thinks he knows everything there is to know then he needs to quit and go home because he is getting ready to hurt himself as well as others. There are no experts in this field. If you do not learn something new everyday on every call then your not doing something right. There are no experts wether you have 1 yr or 30 yrs. Experience is the wonderful knowledge that enables you to recognize a mistake when you make it again!! Any one can get water to the end of a line , but doing it without hurting the guys on the end makes all the difference. To much pressure can work them to death. To little wont protect and get the job done. Most of this job is common sense, you guys know that. All it takes is one second to screw things up real bad. For Example the tention span of some juniors. What happens when hes pumping the truck and the cheerleaders walk by? Tcmib379 what ind of crew do you operate? Are you up in the ranks? Engine-Tower1 arent you from the department that uses a bowling pin to tighten suction hose?

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  • PFDE4
    replied
    Ok 16 not fifteen, I'm sorry, huge difference there.

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  • HOTDOG
    replied
    Well well well.....

    First of all, I stated what I had been told by some adjuncts....I never stated this was fact or fiction just to clear that up.

    As for my name...What the hell do you mean it says it all? Ha, you make me laugh with your immature strikes at me. It takes more than that to get under my skin.

    CapnStan: Don't worry, I have the number to the DFP but thank you for asking. Glad you were an adjunct and if you are all you said, sorry to see you leave, we always like to keep the good ones around....like the view from an experienced ones....

    I did read the whole thread, thank you. Sorry I conveyed what was known to me.

    Simply put, our insurances says no...hell no to our juniors participating on the fireground in suppression, simply put. I don't have to sit here and cut others to defend my point cause that is the way it is and the way I feel. Simple. I don't know anything about your son or his maturity level (other than what is on this thread, and I am not impressed). It is simply not fair to single out one or two of our juniors who we "feel" is more mature than another. They have, hopefully, a long career ahead of them, as well as a long life, and I personally do not want to be a part of shortening those by sending them into a IDLF situation.

    As far as it being a personal problem that juniors can't keep their mouths shut, that it is not. Our guys know when to shut up, if not they learn real quick. We have a really good bunch of juniors and as I have previously stated, if you read my posts, juniors are an important part of the fire service and I enjoy working with them every chance I get, but until they are 18, the only hose they will be on is on drill night.

    engtow: I do, however, wish you luck on a long and prosperous career. I also wish you luck on controlling your excitement, your gonna stroke!

    I have said enough....movin on to better things.

    Leave a comment:

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