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When is an officer no longer considered "New"?

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  • amyacker
    replied
    Might be 20 years are still not enough to become the best in town.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    What's that old saw? A firefighter with 20 years of experience, or one year of experience 20 times?

    There are so many variables - a firefighter may be a competent firefighter but a lousy manager/leader. And vice versa.

    And, in a less than busy department, captnjak may well have it pegged. The position needs to be filled - so you pick the best you have available.

    Leave a comment:


  • captnjak
    replied
    Originally posted by drparasite View Post
    Which is why I though I would bring it up. During the after action report for the Folk County fatal fire, one of the first comments was ?The Captain and Firefighter are both inexperienced? (as reiterated in https://www.firefighterclosecalls.co...-fire-florida/) which made me think 1) if he was that inexperienced, why was he the captain of the engine, and responsible for the crew and 2) how long do you need to be an officer (i'm assuming he went form FF to captain), before you are deemed competent enough to no longer be called inexperienced?

    Yes, a new officer still has to learn the ropes, and transition their mindset into their new role, but is a year enough? two years as a career officer? three? and does their time as an acting officer help shorten that time?
    I suspect that he was Captain because he was the best AVAILABLE choice to be Captain. Relative to others in the department he may have been the most experienced.

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  • captnjak
    replied
    Originally posted by fire49 View Post
    First day they are promoted?? They become old.

    Most have done the duties, before getting promoted.
    Not sure that's true at all. I suspect the majority of career departments do not allow large scale acting as officers.

    Leave a comment:


  • drparasite
    replied
    Which is why I though I would bring it up. During the after action report for the Folk County fatal fire, one of the first comments was ?The Captain and Firefighter are both inexperienced? (as reiterated in https://www.firefighterclosecalls.co...-fire-florida/) which made me think 1) if he was that inexperienced, why was he the captain of the engine, and responsible for the crew and 2) how long do you need to be an officer (i'm assuming he went form FF to captain), before you are deemed competent enough to no longer be called inexperienced?

    Yes, a new officer still has to learn the ropes, and transition their mindset into their new role, but is a year enough? two years as a career officer? three? and does their time as an acting officer help shorten that time?

    Leave a comment:


  • fire49
    replied
    First day they are promoted?? They become old.

    Most have done the duties, before getting promoted.

    Leave a comment:


  • RFDACM02
    replied
    Along the lines of what Captnjak said, I'm not sure there's a definition that would fit every situation. So much depends of the amount of work an officer gets.

    Leave a comment:


  • captnjak
    replied
    I'll be the thorn in your side who points out that there is a big difference between time and experience. A five year Lt can't be considered new but he can be considered inexperienced in fire and emergency operations.
    A boss who works in a very active area can learn a ton in their first year while another boss in a slow area will learn little.
    We have some veteran career officers who have learned very little.

    Leave a comment:


  • drparasite
    started a topic When is an officer no longer considered "New"?

    When is an officer no longer considered "New"?

    I'm listening to some firefighter podcasts, as well as reading some major incident after action reports, and one thing that seems to pop up frequently is a new Lt or Captain. Then when they describe said officer, they say they have only been a Lt or Captain for 2 or 3 years, which is a decent time in the volunteer world, where you can go form Lt to Captain in less than 2 years.

    So while I think we can agree that anyone in an officer position less than a year is considered a "new" officer, at what point, particularly in a career department, is an officer considered competent enough in their job where they are no longer considered to be new?

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