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  • #16
    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post

    Why not? Some of the places they go to in New York it offers some bio-hazard protection. When crouching taking care of patients.

    If I had shorts on I always wore my bunker pants to EMS calls.
    Most guys wear station shorts year round. And bunker pants when leaving quarters for almost any reason.

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    • #17
      As a FD that does EMS as well, I can tell you that it is a PIA to carry your TOG on the apparatus as opposed to wearing it, and putting it on needs to occur before arrival at the scene.We do this but we have no room dedicated to carry TOG except on your person, so finding a place to toss it is always an issue. I require my guys to put on their gear when we take a run as opposed to arriving with no gear on and look like the proverbial monkey copulating with a football while stuff is burning. Or worse yet, not putting it all on correctly.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by FyredUp View Post

        Why not? Some of the places they go to in New York it offers some bio-hazard protection. When crouching taking care of patients.

        If I had shorts on I always wore my bunker pants to EMS calls.
        Bunkers don't really offer protection from bed bugs, it offers them a place to hitch a ride. And they don't prevent airborne diseases. And if I get crap all over my bunkers then I have to take them out of service to wash them. I have half a dozen uniforms I can change into. I've never been severely contaminated wearing a duty uniform in 35 years. We have sheets, blankets, or towels we can kneel down on if we need to. If the house is that bad, the first thing we do is get them out of there. Less time in= less exposure. If the house is that bad, I'd wear a Tyvek suit.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by RFDACM02 View Post
          As a FD that does EMS as well, I can tell you that it is a PIA to carry your TOG on the apparatus as opposed to wearing it, and putting it on needs to occur before arrival at the scene.We do this but we have no room dedicated to carry TOG except on your person, so finding a place to toss it is always an issue. I require my guys to put on their gear when we take a run as opposed to arriving with no gear on and look like the proverbial monkey copulating with a football while stuff is burning. Or worse yet, not putting it all on correctly.
          Maybe you should spec your engines with enough room for turnout gear. Our cabs are large enough for that. The last thing I want to be wearing on a 90+ degree day is turnout gear on an EMS run.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by captnjak View Post

            Could there not be bedbugs or roaches in houses with water leaks or gas leaks or electrical conditions or odor calls or structural conditions or false alarms or alarm activations or any of the other countless types of calls we get?

            Our average engine does at least 5000 calls per year. That gear is gonna get funky no matter what.

            The guys don't want to stop to get dressed if they receive a run for a reported structural fire. When they leave quarters the bunker pants are on. Coat too if it's not too warm. Calls often come in without getting back to quarters so the gear is on should it be needed.

            It may not be ideal. It's just what we do.
            If we're not supposed to bring fire gear into the living quarters of the station, why would we bring it into people's houses if not necessary?

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            • #21
              If your gear is so dirty that you're afraid to wear it into someone's house, it needs to be deconned.. Period. Including the boots.

              The only possible reason to be wearing "salty" gear on a call is if you're leaving a working fire to respond to the second call.

              I know that not everyone can afford two sets of gear (we have a very few people who do), career folks go off duty at some point, and volunteers can just wash their gear at the first opportunity.

              At the very least, one's boots should be thoroughly cleaned after a dirty call. Then you're not tracking junk around.
              Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

              Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by johnsb View Post

                If we're not supposed to bring fire gear into the living quarters of the station, why would we bring it into people's houses if not necessary?
                I've already answered that.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by johnsb View Post

                  Maybe you should spec your engines with enough room for turnout gear. Our cabs are large enough for that. The last thing I want to be wearing on a 90+ degree day is turnout gear on an EMS run.
                  Oh I suspect this will be happening on future apparatus. But as we know, fire apparatus real estate is some of the most expensive property in the nation!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by johnsb View Post

                    Maybe you should spec your engines with enough room for turnout gear. Our cabs are large enough for that. The last thing I want to be wearing on a 90+ degree day is turnout gear on an EMS run.
                    Our engine came in with compartments for helmets...
                    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by johnsb View Post

                      Bunkers don't really offer protection from bed bugs, it offers them a place to hitch a ride. And they don't prevent airborne diseases. And if I get crap all over my bunkers then I have to take them out of service to wash them. I have half a dozen uniforms I can change into. I've never been severely contaminated wearing a duty uniform in 35 years. We have sheets, blankets, or towels we can kneel down on if we need to. If the house is that bad, the first thing we do is get them out of there. Less time in= less exposure. If the house is that bad, I'd wear a Tyvek suit.
                      Dude, do whatever you want. Honestly it doesn't matter to me. But as for me having worked EMS in houses with pee soaked carpets, schidt, blood, vomit and so on on the floor and furniture I would rather use my bunkers to keep that off from me than count on a clean pair of pants back at the station. As for having to wash my bunkers most of the FDs I have been on either assigned a second set of gear or had spare gear we could use while ours was drying.

                      Just a question though...do you carry tyvec suits and booties on the ambulance as standard equipment?
                      Crazy, but that's how it goes
                      Millions of people living as foes
                      Maybe it's not too late
                      To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by FyredUp View Post

                        Dude, do whatever you want. Honestly it doesn't matter to me. But as for me having worked EMS in houses with pee soaked carpets, schidt, blood, vomit and so on on the floor and furniture I would rather use my bunkers to keep that off from me than count on a clean pair of pants back at the station. As for having to wash my bunkers most of the FDs I have been on either assigned a second set of gear or had spare gear we could use while ours was drying.

                        Just a question though...do you carry tyvec suits and booties on the ambulance as standard equipment?
                        Not specifically tyvec, but we do have coverings for these situations if needed that are always on the truck. And we usually have at least a dozen blankets and towels to lay down if needed, and mega movers which are like tyvec material. And they're all expendable materials.
                        Our dept. says one thing about clean gear, but does another. Our Bn. Chief pressed the issue, and got everyone in our Bn. a new set of gear if theirs was over 10 years old, which gave about 70% of us a second set. This was just for our Bn., on our shift. That's one out of 7 Bn's. on one shift. And that cost the dept. half the annual budget for firegear.
                        Go figure.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by johnsb View Post

                          Not specifically tyvec, but we do have coverings for these situations if needed that are always on the truck. And we usually have at least a dozen blankets and towels to lay down if needed, and mega movers which are like tyvec material. And they're all expendable materials.
                          Our dept. says one thing about clean gear, but does another. Our Bn. Chief pressed the issue, and got everyone in our Bn. a new set of gear if theirs was over 10 years old, which gave about 70% of us a second set. This was just for our Bn., on our shift. That's one out of 7 Bn's. on one shift. And that cost the dept. half the annual budget for firegear.
                          Go figure.
                          Tyvek style suits seem like a little overkill to me. Let alone the fact I just don't see people taking the time to put them on. Blankets and towels will not stop seep through of bodily fluids or any other fluids for that matter.

                          Bunker pants on the other hand have a moisture barrier designed to not allow liquids in. So they do offer protection from that. As for bed bugs or other insects bunker pants may not offer 100% protection from that, but neither do uniform pants, shorts, or even a Tyvek suit.

                          To me it seems incredibly short sighted, especially in a busy department, not to have replacement gear to allow cleaning of your primary set.
                          Crazy, but that's how it goes
                          Millions of people living as foes
                          Maybe it's not too late
                          To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            I never thought of such a detail, the important thing is comfortable to wear

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by FyredUp View Post

                              Tyvek style suits seem like a little overkill to me. Let alone the fact I just don't see people taking the time to put them on. Blankets and towels will not stop seep through of bodily fluids or any other fluids for that matter.

                              Bunker pants on the other hand have a moisture barrier designed to not allow liquids in. So they do offer protection from that. As for bed bugs or other insects bunker pants may not offer 100% protection from that, but neither do uniform pants, shorts, or even a Tyvek suit.

                              To me it seems incredibly short sighted, especially in a busy department, not to have replacement gear to allow cleaning of your primary set.

                              "Short sighted" is our cities mission statement...
                              And if we use blankets or towels, we're not going to be hanging around long enough to worry about seepage...

                              Comment

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