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Drafting "tricks"

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  • #16
    Originally posted by dfelix22000us View Post
    I think I'm our default "resident welder". I think I have half of an idea of what you describe, but a picture would certainly help!
    I'll see what I can do for you.
    Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

    Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

    Comment


    • #17
      Let's see if these will post for you.



      Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

      Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

      Comment


      • #18
        Some interesting discussion here. First, when connecting hard sleeve, make sure your connections are tight before starting your prime. Dirty swivels and green firefighters are a combination for a connection that is NOT tight enough to hold the gasket in place when initiating the priming operation. The less than tight condition allows the gasket to pull inward, creating an air leak. Tightening with a spanner or pounding lugs with a hammer simply ensures that the leak will continue. If you have a leaking connection, loosen the joint to let the gasket snap back in place and then retighten it correctly. Buy new gaskets and replace them regularly. EastKyFF The method that you describe was published by Hale Pumps in a hand-out from the 1950's. Flow rate at the top of a stream is 125% of the total flow. (slower at the bottom) so the Hale hand out recommended "pacing" off 12 feet and then treating it like it was 10 feet. Depth at the center and width are used to calculate the area of a triangle (imaginary) that the water is flowing through (do everything in feet) so a one foot deep stream that is 12 feet wide will have an area of 1 x 12 / 2 = 6 sq. ft. A stop watch and a stick determines that the time to pass the 12 ft is 30 seconds so our stream is making 20 ft. per minute. 6 x 20 = 120 sq ft and since there is 7.48 (7.5) gal per cu ft. the stream flow will be 900 gpm. Some words of caution about pulling the tank to pump when priming... Many engines that operate in cold weather experience some degree of freezing in the tank to pump line. Typically this results in a minor leak (water) from the tank into the pump. once you remove all the water from your apparatus tank, the air is free to leak through the valve preventing you from ever getting a prime, unless you put some water back into the tank and covering the valve. The reason that dropping the tank water into the pump works in helping get the prime, is usually poorly adjusted packings. There is a small line from the pressure side of the pump that carries a small amount of water back into the packing gland to keep the pump shaft cool and seal the shaft. Once any pump pressure is developed, this water flows into the gland sealing the air leak. Dumping your tank back down the hard sleeve DOES NOT flush any significant amount of trapped air out of the hard sleeve. The only way this can work is if you have a "Foot Valve" on the end of the suction. You can see this if you have a joint of clear suction and drop your tank through it into a drop tank. The water simply flows down the bottom of the sleeve and the air stays trapped at the top. If you need to help clear air from your pump, open a discharge, turn up the throttle to maintain some discharge pressure (5 psi or more) and the pump will "entrain" the air in the flow of water, pulling out the air in the suction side of the system. It works better if you use the tank fill for the discharge, that way you are conserving water and the air comes out the tank vent. You will still lose some water down the suction sleeve, but the return water will allow you a better chance of success. If you are blessed with a portable pump, hook it up and put the water into the suction on the side opposite the hard sleeve, providing a continuous supply of water to secure a prime.

        Comment


        • #19
          Drafting tricks? How about good procedure? Make sure the gaskets are good. Tighten the fittings and give them a couple of taps with the rubber mallet. Make sure you are drafting with a vertical lift of under 20 feet. Throttle up to around 1000 to 1100 rpms. Pull the primer and hold it. You can go 30 plus seconds without a problem, assuming proper maintenance. When you get prime throttle up to maintain it.

          If the primer fails you can back fill the suction hose from your water tank. As soon as the bubbles disappear throttle up and you should have prime. I have done this myself on numerous occasions. Once because I had to, other times in training.

          Crazy, but that's how it goes
          Millions of people living as foes
          Maybe it's not too late
          To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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          • #20

            Watch your suction hose. If it's the new stuff, you can see through it and tell when you're near to getting water.

            If it's the old black rubber stuff, watch for it to sag next to the engine.

            I like the spanner wrenches pictured above simply because you can just pull two against each other until you can't. Beating with a hammer works, but unless you're a blacksmith or a carpenter, the blows tend to wander, and holding the suction hose up at a coupling introduces bind.

            Our new pumper uses an air/venturi prime. As long as there's air on the truck, it'll prime. No motor to burn out or oil reservoir to run dry.

            Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

            Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

            Comment


            • #21
              We've gone to using low level strainers with jet siphons to make it even easier. And the old backfilling the suction hose with tank water helps to. The less air you start out with, the better.

              Comment

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