Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse

Firehouse.com Forum Rules & Guidelines

Forum Rules & Guidelines

Not Permitted or Tolerated:
• Advertising and/or links of commercial, for-profit websites, products, and/or services is not permitted. If you have a need to advertise on Firehouse.com please contact sales@firehouse.com
• Fighting/arguing
• Cyber-bullying
• Swearing
• Name-calling and/or personal attacks
• Spamming
• Typing in all CAPS
• “l33t speak” - Substituting characters for letters in an effort to represent a word or phrase. (example: M*****ive)
• Distribution of another person’s personal information, regardless of whether or not said information is public knowledge and whether or not an individual has permission to post said personal information
• Piracy advocation of any kind
• Racist, sexual, hate type defamatory, religious, political, or sexual commentary.
• Multiple forum accounts

Forum Posting Guidelines:

Posts must be on-topic, non-disruptive and relevant to the firefighting community. Post only in a mature and responsible way that contributes to the discussion at hand. Posting relevant information, helpful suggestions and/or constructive criticism is a great way to contribute to the community.

Post in the correct forum and have clear titles for your threads.

Please post in English or provide a translation.

There are moderators and admins who handle these forums with care, do not resort to self-help, instead please utilize the reporting option. Be mature and responsible for yourself and your posts. If you are offended by another member utilize the reporting option. All reported posts will be addressed and dealt with as deemed appropriate by Firehouse.com staff.

Firehouse.com Moderation Process:
Effective immediately, the following moderation process will take effect. User(s) whose posts are determined by Firehouse.com staff to be in violation of any of the rules above will EARN the following reprimand(s) in the moderation process:
1. An initial warning will be issued.
2. A Final Warning will be issued if a user is found to be in violation a second time.
3. A 3-day suspension will be issued if the user continues to break the forum rules.
4. A 45-day suspension will be issued if the user is found to be a habitual rule breaker.
5. Habitual rule breakers that have exhausted all of the above will receive a permanent life-time ban that will be strictly enforced. Reinstatement will not be allowed – there is no appeal process.

Subsequent accounts created in an effort to side-step the rules and moderation process are subject to automatic removal without notice. Firehouse.com reserves the right to expedite the reprimand process for any users as it is deemed necessary. Any user in the moderation process may be required to review and agree to by email the terms and conditions listed above before their account is re-instated (except for those that are banned).

Firehouse.com reserves the right to edit and/or remove any post or member, at any time, for any reason without notice. Firehouse.com also reserves the right to warn, suspend, and/or ban, any member, at any time, for any reason.

Firehouse.com values the active participation we have in our forums. Please ensure your posts are tasteful and tactful. Thank you very much for your cooperation.
See more
See less

Coasting Into Quarters

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Coasting Into Quarters

    For years, our members complained (rightfully so) that we were being exposed to carcinogens because we didn't have a ventilation system. In the last year, we've replaced one of stations with a new one that has a Magnegrip system (similar to Plymovent) and have retrofitted our other station with Magnegrip system, too.

    Well, wouldn't you know it... The members are still complaining. lol.

    Their complaint is that the person hooking up the hose to the exhaust is being exposed to an unnecessary amount of carcinogens. So, their solution is to have the driver shut off the apparatus as they approach the drive-thru bay. They then coast into quarters and hook the rig up to the exhaust system once it has come to a stop. No, I know this method isn't proper... But unless I can find some documentation that it's not good for the apparatus, it will likely continue.

    Anyone have any ideas? Sources of information?

    We've got a lot of great guys on the department... but the fact they're doing something completely opposite of most people in the world seems like an incentive to some of them -- and not the warning sign that it sometimes should be.
    Last edited by cozmosis; 01-14-2018, 06:35 PM. Reason: Editing because it's their and not there.
    sigpic

  • #2
    Honestly, I would set down a policy that said that the person attaching the hose has to wear an SCBA. Under NO circumstances would I allow the rig to be powered off and coasted in. This just sounds like a couple of trouble makers looking for a ****ing match to me.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

    Comment


    • #3
      Yeah coasting into the station is a disaster waiting to happen, then comes the lawsuits.... Sounds like trouble makers to me but yeah like said above make a policy requiring scba use while hooking up
      Get the first line into operation.

      Comment


      • #4
        The local NFP ambulance squad has an evacuation-type system in the bays. No hoses, just a relatively quick flush of the bays.

        I agree that some air monitoring should be done. OTOH, how long does the truck run after entering the station?

        I know some systems have you hooking the hose up as the rig enters the station, but even then it's not like you're sitting there for an extended time in the exhaust plume.

        Requiring use of SCBA while hooking it up means the truck has to idle outside while someone packs up. You don't want folks donning while driving down the road...

        If they're worried more about the particulates, they could probably use an N95 mask...

        Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

        Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by tree68 View Post
          The local NFP ambulance squad has an evacuation-type system in the bays. No hoses, just a relatively quick flush of the bays.

          I agree that some air monitoring should be done. OTOH, how long does the truck run after entering the station?

          I know some systems have you hooking the hose up as the rig enters the station, but even then it's not like you're sitting there for an extended time in the exhaust plume.

          Requiring use of SCBA while hooking it up means the truck has to idle outside while someone packs up. You don't want folks donning while driving down the road...

          If they're worried more about the particulates, they could probably use an N95 mask...
          So what if the rig has to idle outside while someone packs up? This whole thing is idiotic nonsense. Dismount the rig, get the hose and meet the rig at the door, attach the hose before the rig enters the bay. Unless the guy putting the hose on is a klutz it takes at most 10 seconds.
          Crazy, but that's how it goes
          Millions of people living as foes
          Maybe it's not too late
          To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

          Comment


          • #6
            Don't bother to hook up the hose until the apparatus is fully parked and shut down. It's the safest simplest way. Yes you will have a small amount of exhaust dumped in the station. First, it's tons less than before you had the system, and second, the warm motor emissions are much "cleaner" than those at start-up and initial response.

            I can't imagine the other things those same clowns would complain about if this is somehow an issue after having nothing for extraction before! How do they protect themselves at fires? SCBA to and from?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by FyredUp View Post

              So what if the rig has to idle outside while someone packs up? This whole thing is idiotic nonsense. Dismount the rig, get the hose and meet the rig at the door, attach the hose before the rig enters the bay. Unless the guy putting the hose on is a klutz it takes at most 10 seconds.
              For sure. I'm imagining that these people will complain even outside, since they have to get within 3 feet of the exhaust pipe to make the connection...

              Probably the same guys who will stand around the exhaust pipe to warm up on a cold day...

              They probably don't want to have to get off the rig before it's parked... You know, big aprons (so no need to block traffic) and remote door openers...
              Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

              Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tree68 View Post

                For sure. I'm imagining that these people will complain even outside, since they have to get within 3 feet of the exhaust pipe to make the connection...

                Probably the same guys who will stand around the exhaust pipe to warm up on a cold day...

                They probably don't want to have to get off the rig before it's parked... You know, big aprons (so no need to block traffic) and remote door openers...
                On my former career gig the officer's side back seat rider would get out as the rig stopped at the door, they would pull the hose to the door and as the rig backed in would put the hose on as the truck backed by. I suppose that would be considered pretty damn rough by today's standards.
                Crazy, but that's how it goes
                Millions of people living as foes
                Maybe it's not too late
                To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
                  I suppose that would be considered pretty damn rough by today's standards.
                  Oh, the inhumanity of it all!

                  [/sarcasm]

                  Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                  Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    So do these bubble boys ever go outside? Do they wait for the rig to be turned off before getting off at a call? Wait until everybody is back in their seats before starting the engine? I'm sure it is standard practice to wear an SCBA while working the pump panel, wouldn't want them exposed to those exhaust fumes.

                    Here is an idea, shut the engine off in front of the station, release the brakes and have the bubble buys push it back into the stall. That will provide more control of the vehicle.


                    Sorry I'm with the rest, these sound like serial whiners who don't want their recliner time interrupted by their job.


                    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post

                    On my former career gig the officer's side back seat rider would get out as the rig stopped at the door, they would pull the hose to the door and as the rig backed in would put the hose on as the truck backed by. I suppose that would be considered pretty damn rough by today's standards.
                    That's so 90s. We thought it was pretty high tech at the time, but I'm guessing today's health conscious firefighter on the go wants, no needs it bluetooth compatible.

                    I'm guessing automatic sprayers to wash the road grime off after a run in the rain will be next. Wouldn't want people getting wet, they might catch a sniffle. We did it with a hose and brush, and yes we got wet and yes we did it at 2am. It had to do with taking some pride in the rigs appearance.


                    I know a lot of young firefighters who take the job seriously, but some of these guys. Of course we had our share of worthless image only firefighters, and the old timers had their stories about "that guy" too so I guess its really nothing new.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I'm betting the guys that coast into the stall to prevent inhaling fumes probably have a wad of chew in their mouths....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by cozmosis View Post
                        So, their solution is to have the driver shut off the apparatus as they approach the drive-thru bay. They then coast into quarters and hook the rig up to the exhaust system once it has come to a stop. No, I know this method isn't proper... But unless I can find some documentation that it's not good for the apparatus, it will likely continue.
                        dude.... are you serious? please tell me your joking..... this can't be what someone thought of as a good idea..... I'm assuming you only have drive through bays, because backing up and doing this sounds even more stupid.

                        How about this: have your exhaust hose stretch to the front or back of the bay. once the exhaust of the truck enters the bay, the truck stops, and a firefighter immediately attaches it, initiating the exhaust system. If you are worried about inhaling said carcinogens in the exhaust (which I will give them, is a valid concern), I have two solutions: hold your breath for the 3 seconds it takes you to apply the hose, and then take a good breath of clean air from the outside, or put on an SCBA mask and airpack, with the air flowing, and specify that it's firefighters choice as to what he can do.

                        Here us a question: so if they are "coasting" into quarters, and don't have enough initially forward momentum, do they leave the truck in neutral and then push it into the correct parking spot? if they misjudge the distance and go too far, do they push it back? coasting just sounds both dangerous and a really bad idea.
                        If my basic HazMat training has taught me nothing else, it's that if you see a glowing green monkey running away from something, follow that monkey!

                        FF/EMT/DBP

                        Comment

                        300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                        Collapse

                        Upper 300x250

                        Collapse

                        Taboola

                        Collapse

                        Leader

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X