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Boosting hydrant pressure.

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  • Witoo1991
    replied
    I read this book about firefighters. I liked the story of Robert Mitchell. It reminded me of the variety of Stephen King stories or free examples of essays on such resources https://gradesfixer.com/free-essay-examples/diversity/. I want to see the whole story or the firefighters thought of the author. I am distracted by a jump in stories and time that may be in the future.

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    webcrest...Who is paying you to post multiple ads all over FH.com? Your advertising violates policy here.

    All of your posts are being reported.

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  • Too_Old
    replied
    How much is a Humat valve ? It's not like you need dozends of them on each engine, you need one and it'll out last the piece.

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  • kuh shise
    replied
    In this arrangement, the drop in pressure through the 2 1/2" discharge and the clappered Siamese at 700 gpm would be about 20 psi. The hydrant would need to have a supply such that the residual at 700 gpm would be 40 psi to push the 700 gpm through a 500 ft. forward lay of 5" hose. A 50 ft. piece of 3" with 2 1/2" couplings would need only 25 psi residual to feed the relay engine at 700 gpm. (line from the gate valve) This is a good alternative to paying many $ for a 4 way hydrant valve. Limitations will occur at flows above the 700 gpm example. At flows of 500 gpm and below, the D-PO will need to keep at least 10 psi on the intake to keep from pulling the hydrant below the minimum desired residual of 20 psi on the system.

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    I am having technical difficulty's today, That is how the valve operates.

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  • L-Webb
    replied

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    This is what the setup looks like minus the steamer there would only be 2 2.5 discharges. We try to use our short sections of 3" ** squirrel trails ** if possible.
    https://forums.firehouse.com/filedat...ledataid=23906

    I have no idea why the picture imported like that

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  • FlyingRon
    replied
    The classic old school way was a Meushaw valve. Essentially this was a hunk of brass with two valves. In it's initial state, the 4" fiting fits the hydrant and flows to a 2 1/2" fitting for the first responding engine. The second engine comes along and hooks up to the large bore and opens the first valve allowing them to be fed from the hydrant, they then pump into the 2 1/2" fitting on the meushaw and the second vale is opened to switch from hydrant pressure to the engine pressure.

    This was improved upon by Rupert Hurley Mathews, a firefighter in Balitmore County, MD. He improved on the meushaw design by taking out the second valve. As you applied pressure from the engine it moved a flapper to switch the 2 1/2" fitting from the hydrant to the engine. The device (and the company that makes it) was named after him. HuMat (for Hurley Mathews).

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  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by RFDACM02 View Post
    Are you're hydrants just two 2 1/2" ports or are you just skipping the big port?
    Oh wow didn't even think about that....All our plugs have the 4.5" steamer connections and the 2.5 ports.

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  • RFDACM02
    replied
    I gotta say, my brain was itchy trying to picture this evolution? But I think I can now "see" it. You're basically making a smaller version of a hydrant assist valve using the wye and a gate valve. Are you're hydrants just two 2 1/2" ports or are you just skipping the big port?

    Interestingly, a hydrant assist valve will run about $1k. A jumbo siamese with 5" discharge and 2 2.5" females is just $240. Seems like a nice little hack.
    Last edited by RFDACM02; 09-14-2017, 03:13 PM.

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  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by L-Webb View Post
    We normally only use this method on our red tops, they only have 30 lbs or so
    That makes sense.

    I am pretty sure I know the clappered wye you are using.

    How much volume from those 30lb plugs?

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    Originally posted by fire5555
    So it seems you are just using the hydrant as a connection, instead of hooking the second engine directly to the hydrant, and pumping through the engine to the 1st truck?


    I wonder if they have blown any domestic pipe to houses??
    Sometimes the 2nd does pump directly to the scene, part our response area is mountainous so the response of the 2nd in can be delayed. We forward lay in this situation so we can at least have some sort of water supply.

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  • L-Webb
    replied
    We normally only use this method on our red tops, they only have 30 lbs or so and yes we pump @80 which forces the clapper closed preventing back flow. I will look into the Humat valve.

    Most of these are on the older water system, we have many green and blue top hydrants which flow 1000-1500 and 1500 and up respectively.

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