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standard and medium duty rescue equipment list

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  • standard and medium duty rescue equipment list

    Does anyone have their standard or medium duty rescue equipment list we are looking at expanding right now we just have jaws and .some cribbing. We have a decent amount of space on our rescue engine. Weare wanting to force on auto extrication, low angle, haz mat ops, and basic water rescue, also removing pts from wooded area without vehicle access. if you have your equipment list already saved you could post or send that. [email protected]

    Thanks in advance
    Chaplin Jason James Fire & EMS instructor
    Rev. Jason D. James; Asst. Chief (Ret), Chaplain, Training Officer, FTO, Safety Officer, PIO, IFSAC I, II, HAZ MAT TECHNICIAN, CCEMT-P, NREMT-P, FP-C, Kentucky Licensed Paramedic, Kentucky Fire Instructor, Kentucky EMT-B & Paramedic Instructor, EMD, Hostage Negotiator-Basic. High Angle Tech, Swift Water Tech. KY DOCJT Telecommunicator Academy Class 007 (2000).

  • #2
    Get a set of struts. So many uses.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

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    • #3
      So much of this is going to be dependent on your area, your hazards and the level of training of your members.

      As far as extrication, I certainly agree that struts would be an important ppiece of equipment, I would add airbags as well. While this may be old school, I would also recommend an step chocks, air chisel and a come-along and related chains. I would also have couple of rip saws - One battery powered and one electric.

      As far as water rescue, unless your members are trained at the operations or technician level, you are pretty much limited to shore-based rescue, which means throw bags and life preservers for the responders.

      Your members training and certification levels on low angle will also dictate the type of equipment that you can use. If you are operations level you could carry harnesses, rope bags, a stokes and related hardware. This will represent a significant investment - look carefully at cost vs. frequency.

      As far as haz-mat .... Likely looking at defensive tools such as booms, pads, absorbent, and flat shovels to construct dams/dikes and Level B protection such as Tyvex. If you have space beyond that could be used to store decontamination equipment.
      Train to fight the fires you fight.

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      • #4
        I'm with LA here. We had a light rescue, but what we carried on it probably wouldn't fit your needs.

        So you need to consider the role(s) you want the apparatus to play and equip accordingly.

        As for extrication - everyone focuses on hydraulic tools. Saws (recip and rip) can be useful for extrication, and even for overhaul. Glass cutters - there are some pretty cool ones available, chocking, blocking, accessories that make your hydraulic tool more effective. All things to consider.
        Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

        Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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        • #5
          Thanks a lots for your crucial tips.

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