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  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    Perhaps the question should be broken apart:
    1) What is SOP regarding seatbelts in jump seat.
    2) Do you follow it?
    3) Do you pack up en route?


    Point 1) These forums are indefinetely archived

    Point 2) If you answer (2) with anything other than "YES" boy oh boy do I want to be a fly on the wall when the insurance company lawyers find that during discovery. "We have here a document where you said you don't follow SOP. Do you still think xxxxx is liable?"

    They can search the internet just as well as anyone.
    ====================
    It takes practice, but I can usually slide my arm into one side getting into the seat. Jump in, spread straps, slide one on, sit, buckle, other arm, waist strap. And I'm a big guy.

    The only ****er is I occassionally put on the mask on scene and realize I forgot to turn the bottle on enroute...

    Also, I never seem to have the best fit packing sitting down...sometimes tighten the straps after I stand up on scene.

    Leave a comment:


  • axeyaz
    replied
    Truckie 147, I never put on my mask in the truck, and dont know anyone who does, But I still put my pack on in the truck. I think it's two seperate things.

    Leave a comment:


  • PA Volunteer
    replied
    Pack up on the way ... if you don't, get out of the way. I put my pack on but leave the belt unbuckled until I'm ready to go in. That way, it forces me to take a second to stop, look around, size up the building, etc. This helps me avoid tunnel vision. Anyone who puts their mask on before they get off the engine gets the accountability board. I don't want anyone putting their mask on until assignments are clear, and they have a chance for size up. Putting your mask on before you go in is the biggest lead in to tunnel vision and miscommunication. This is just what I've learned from experience and observing others.

    Stay Safe

    Leave a comment:


  • truckie_ladderco_147
    replied
    no to seatbelts,yes enroute but after this weekends training in Monroe Wi. I believe I will leave the mask off till I get there.
    They taught a good class on fire attack and stressed that it is EVERY fire fighters job to do size up.Cant do it with the mask on.
    Now before anyone gets on me about the seatblts, please dont waste your time.I am sure your department does something unsafe every now and then too.Plus there is one truck that has no seatbelts in the back compartment where we ride.
    Let the fireworks commence 100 years of tradition unimpeded by progress

    Leave a comment:


  • PFD_66
    replied
    Dont put mine on till I get off the truck, I just throw one arm thru the strap and drag it out with me.
    It takes all of 10 seconds to finish throwing it on from there.

    Leave a comment:


  • axeyaz
    replied
    Hey Metal, I can tell you that if an alarm is a problem, you can make up a small 6 or 8 inch extension for the seat belt and leave one end inserted into the female end of the buckel and this should silence the alarm, while still letting you pack out and buckle up while in route without. NOT THAT I HAVE DONE IT. Keeping in mind that wearing a seatbelt only makes sense, it's our own safety.

    Leave a comment:


  • MetalMedic
    replied
    Now I will show my age. The first department I was on had two working SCBAs for the entire station. These were located in brackets in side cabinets of our mini-pumper. If I had my preference, I would prefer to put the SCBA on after we arrived like we did back then. I found that the extra time you took at the scene putting the SCBA on gave me a chance to catch my breath and THINK about what I was doing. Now that you arrive with your pack on, as soon as you jump off the apparatus, you have officers yelling instructions at you that sometimes are in conflict. Then you walk up to the burning building and usually have to wait for the engineer to get your water to you while your back-up stretches out your hose. It may look pretty, but I am not totally sold on the idea that the time you save packing up enroute really makes a significant difference.

    Leave a comment:


  • OLE
    replied
    In our '64 American LaFrance we put them on when we get to the scene. But in our '97 Freightliner we don them in route. The jump seat on the LaFrance are there just to sit in.

    Leave a comment:


  • Firekatz04
    replied
    Our SOG says SCBA will be donned enroute to ANY: Structure, Vehicle, Trash, Dumpster or any Alarm call (Manual pull, CO, or Smoke/Fire AFA) if person in that seat is "SCBA qualified".

    Heli, you said it only takes a minute to put the pack on once you've arrived at the scene and you'd like to hear what-ever else the IC has to say. (No, this isn't an attack... it's observation.) If you have a 2 minute response time and you can pack up in 90 seconds (that's an average... and a HIGH one), you are at an advantage for the worker that you get off the truck for. (No, it doesn't happen everyday, but it DOES happen VERY OFTEN). IF you get off the truck for the worker and you don't have the SCBA on, and you've got LOTS of fire, do you want to stop for even 60 seconds to pack up? That's when you've REALLY got the adreneline flowing.

    Leave a comment:


  • heliguy
    replied
    I see that most departments like ours go the route of donning breathing aparatus enroute to a call.
    I am in disaggreance with this, I like to here what IC has to say before I get all worked up. The chief may want a hydrant from first truck or maybe a 360 walk around.
    A call we went on that sparked all this was an alarm bells call with no following report.
    The safety person happened to be in the jump seat and just freaked out when I mentioned I would put my pack on when we got to the scene(this is not new).I also had to inform safety of the fact he/she was not wearing thier seat belt at a point half way to the call. As we arrived command had just pulled up and two members, fully packed and ready jumped of and started to head into the building for a look.
    It wasn't until command and myself investigated the annuciator panel that we realized the team had aready walked passed the area of alert.
    I think had our command(NEW) had time to sort things out and do a proper size up a much clearer picture of the incident could have been assessed.
    I know we all know to where our packs into a HAZARDOUS atmosphere but waiting to leave the hall because you cannot get your pack and seat belt on in the time it takes to fill the truck seems silly and leaving without the seatbelts on is just wrong. I would prefer jump in sit down buckel up and listen for the next bit of information from IC. Packing up as mentioned only takes a minute and this valuable minute gives IC time to scan the resources and impliment a plan of attack.

    Leave a comment:


  • Adze
    replied
    Our policy is to get them on enroute. If you get off the truck and you don't have a pack on hten you shouldn't be riding that truck.

    Leave a comment:


  • firefighterbiv2335
    replied
    I was always told, u better come off ready to do your job. It is diff. to get packed up in the open cabs. I am lucky enough to be a small guy, but i still have a hell of a time getting packed up, getting a light on. As for the closed cabs. If u are not packed ready to go when u get off, i would send u the nearest intersection with orange gloves and a flashlight, there is no excuse not to be ready

    Leave a comment:


  • trumpeter75
    replied
    In my department, you're expected to get off the truck ready to do the job, which means you'd better have a pack on when one is required. Period. In our ladder truck, which is a canopy (open) cab, it's tight fit but is VERY possible to do. I tell new guys that they should get into the habit of wearing their pack on every call with the exception of MVA's, wires down, and open burns; they can always take them off.

    Leave a comment:


  • no_name_FF
    replied
    Perhaps the question should be broken apart:

    1) What is SOP regarding seatbelts in jump seat.
    2) Do you follow it?
    3) Do you pack up en route?

    Leave a comment:


  • MetalMedic
    replied
    Actually, it is easier to get suited up in our open cab trucks than it is in the closed cabs. With the closed cabs, if you are not wearing your seat belt AND should harness, the alarms sound and the engineer is not to be in motion... it is very hard to hook up those traps in the dark and not get tied into the seat belts. On the open cab, you have just a lap belt that is usually fully extended and out of your way. Of course, in reality, the belts get unbuckled and the driver puts up with the noise... but it is one more distraction I wish we did not have to deal with enroute.

    Leave a comment:

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