Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Wires down or burning

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • PA Volunteer
    replied
    For us, wires down is a Duty Officer Non-Emergency call. Officer gets the pole number and notifies dispatch who notifies the power company. The officer then babysits until PD takes over the scene (usually 5-10 minutes, we're pretty lucky).

    Stay Safe

    Leave a comment:


  • fireff413
    replied
    Wires down are one of those calls that are usually nothing but can very quickly turn into something. For example we responded to a transformer fire about a month ago that brought the primary down on a garage, which very quickly escalated into a working structure fire (1 in a 100 call!!). Our SOP's state that if it is just an arcing wire we will tape off the area and leave an officer in POV with a prep on the scene. If the wire is down or has the DEFINATE possibility of comming down we will sit on it with the engine until the power company arrives.

    Leave a comment:


  • eCappy
    replied
    Any resident in my NJ municipality who even tries "getting in the Chief's face" (or any IC officer for that matter), or who tries disobeying a firefighter's public safety directive (as described by hctrouble25) is, with just a snap of the finger or a nod, promptly arrested by the police officer assigned to the incident for a disorderly persons offense.

    Leave a comment:


  • hctrouble25
    replied
    Hosekey..the Chief would never let it get that far...he was making a point and the guy got it. Simple.

    Sort of like the time we got called out for a transformer blown and sparking with wires down on one end of a street and a transformer blown and two poles down on the other end during a hurricane. We got toned out at 7pm and stayed there until 3am the next morning. I had a guy pull up to our end of the road - the one with two poles down and live wires all over the place on the road, by houses and in the woods next to the homes - and tell me that he was leaving his car there and walking through the woods to his home. I told him he wasn't. He told me "if I get electrocuted you will just have to come in and get me and make sure I am OK and take me out of the woods...so I am going". I looked him right in the eye and said "Mister, if I hear BBBBBBBBBZZZZZZ AAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!, I ain't going anywhere near those woods...you walk past this truck and into those woods and you are on your own. I am not required by law to go in after you. You were told to stay out, and that is all the warning I am required to give you." He looked at me saw I was dead serious and got back in his car and went away. Sometimes the only way to get their attention is to get right to the point no matter how much they might not like it. We deal with the public a lot and I have no problem putting my foot down when needed...most times I am very polite and courteous, but if someone insists on being an idiot I let them know about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • dfwscotty
    replied
    Somewhat along the same line of this topic... How many of you have underground service in your area? You know, the transformer boxes that sit ground level. I've seen pics from an local electric company taken of ff's trying to pry one open that was smoking. Might as well get the aluminum ladder up on a pole as well. Elect. company told us to copy the number on the sides of the box and pass it on to them and they can reroute power away from that box. Sometimes they just explode and the panel doors are designed to take the blast but once that happens, I've told my guys that the money is spent for it already and just standby till they get there.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hosekey21
    replied
    What would be the Chief's next move if the guy takes the can and heads over to put out the little fires?

    Leave a comment:


  • hctrouble25
    replied
    Had wires down in a tree - the wire snapped and was so hot it was causing little fires up in the trees. We stood by waiting for the GPU truck to come shut down the power but they had a 45 minute ETA. So we just stayed there with the Troopers and chatted. Next thing you know some guy comes out gets in our Chief's face and starts yelling about how we are the Fire Department and we should be putting the fires up in the trees out. 1) there were no residences within 100 feet of the pole and wires, and 2) the wires were live! Our Chief handed him a water can and said "those wires are live, and would fry you before you even got within 5 feet of them...but if you are so concerned about the fires up in the trees that are putting themselves out then here have it." The guy left and that was that. We were doing our jobs by securing the scene, and not endangering anyone there. That is all we can do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    No liability, at least in CT. We have the authority to do so, and it's hard to imagine how you could act more negligently directing traffic then leaving a hazard for someone to drive into.

    Sec. 7-313e. Authority of fire officer during emergency... when any fire department or company is responding to or operating at a fire, service call, or other emergency, within such municipality, have the authority to: (a) Control and direct emergency activities at such scene...(c) blockade any public highway, street, or private right-of-way temporarily while at such scene;...

    (subsection (a) by the way is incredibly powerful, and establishes FD predominance on all incidents over all other agencies in CT -- though common sense says let the police be in charge when it's mostly their incident and we're just helping. But under 7-313(a) that big red truck shows up, that officer is now in charge of everyone unless he yields it.)

    Also, if the wires cause a grass fire, do you fight it with the live wire on the ground? Sounds like a recipe for electrocution.

    Yep, gotta stay well away. And try to wait for utilities.

    We have one stretch that was notorious for very active arc-welding of the pavement on a regular basis. Insulated tree wire so the conductor didn't actually touch the ground usually. Used giant Ground Fault Interupts on the 3 phase instead of circuit breakers 'cause a plant 7 miles up the road would trip breakers when they started up. Between insulated wire & GFIs, the fire works would last 30 minutes or more. One day a metal barn and a house 150' away had arcing from the metal to ground and from every appliance to ground just off the induced electric field. Scary call. Two weeks later, a power company truck burned up while trying to repair the line in front of the same house -- line fell, arced a hole in the diesel saddle tank. Whooosh. Linemen jumped for their lives as their foreman shut down the GFIs.

    Leave a comment:


  • no_name_FF
    replied
    I just wonder about the liability aspect of directing traffic if there is an accident.

    Also, if the wires cause a grass fire, do you fight it with the live wire on the ground? Sounds like a recipe for electrocution.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dalmatian90
    replied
    We often end up doing police work (traffic control) that we are not "qualified" to do.

    Doesn't take much time to learn! And in our area, we are primary traffic control for most incidents we respond to, and even occassionally get called specifically to assist the very thinly stretched State Police with traffic control and nothing else.

    Any ways, yeah, they can be pain in the butts. Normally we no longer role apparatus. First officer arriving in POV sizes up, calls back to the station for how many people, what supplies (cones), and where for them to go.

    Depending on the situation it can be
    Notify utilities and...
    -Set up manned road blocks -- 2 people, a POV, and a Portable radio (local roads)
    -Set up manned road blocks w/apparatus (busy roads/highways)
    -Set up cones & scene tape (usually when it's really big storm and we're stretched to thin to guard them and utilities start giving their ETA in days, not hours...)
    -Find no hazard, take no action.

    We also clear trees blocking roads w/ no wires involved -- at least wide enough for a fire truck to get by, even if the rest is left for the town highway crew to clean up. Hard to fight a fire if you can't get to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Gonzo
    replied
    We respond to all wires down/wires burning calls to scope out the situation, make sure that the appropriate personnel (Mass Electric/Verizon/ATT Broadband) are contacted and to make sure that the wires do not pose another hazard. If there is a delayed response by the utlities, they will hire a police officer at detail rate to await their arrival.

    Leave a comment:


  • Fire Line
    replied
    At this time of the year a downed power line will usually cause a grass or brush hose. A downed power line is one of those crappy calls. If you start to pick and choose the calls you responded to then it's time to find a new job.

    Leave a comment:


  • hctrouble25
    replied
    All we can do is babysit...but our job is to protect property and lives...so that is why we are there. Should those wires start a fire, hit a home, hit a person, etc. we are there and ready to assist. That is why we get called out. Same thing with MVAs. My department is the exception because we do the extracation, but even without entrapment we respond in case the car catches fire, the EMTs need help lifting, etc. We are all there to do the same job...save lives and property..why is this so hard for people to comprehend. Just like all the bs mutual aid fighting about who gets what call. Who cares? As long as the job gets done that is what counts. The reason the cops don't direct traffic? I don't know. But we have fire police for that reason and they do the traffic directing at all our calls. It works out well for us, and the cops stay out of our hair.

    Leave a comment:


  • BG204
    replied
    When we respond to powerlines down, we get the pole number if possible, notify the power company, secure the scene and wait. Once the power is off to the area, we extingush any fire and turn the scene over to the power company. If the lines are down from a storm, the wait can be a while. Sorry to say, but, the Fire Deparment is the emergency catch-all.

    Leave a comment:


  • firefightermatt_69
    replied
    I dont think the fd needs to respond to powerlines down or burning unless there is something other than the line or transformer burning it is a waist of time and delays the response time to more serious calls.

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X