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crosslays, how do you lay them?

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  • #16
    TRI FOLD- all the way. You can't whine about how hard it is to pack, it's not that big a deal, you just have to mess around with it the first time or two to get it right. It looks sharp, works great, and no piles of tangled hose.
    These are my opinions and not those of the organizations for which I work and/or volunteer.

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    • #17
      We load a couple of different ways...depending on who's reloading that day. Both work good.

      1. Regular flat lay, with loops on the second fold. If you put them on the bottom fold, the hose load doesn't go anywhere and ends up as spaghetti on the ground.

      2. Triple lay(we use this the most). If you have 150' lays, as we do, then just triple it by picking up the couplings and voila you have three sections. The triple lay take a little longer to repack, but when you pull it out it ALL comes, and you don't need to have somebody make sure it's all out before you charge it.
      I can think of no more stirring symbol of man's humanity to man than a fire engine.

      --Kurt Vonnegut

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      • #18
        I'm impressed with triple load...loads good..takes soem time.. but pulls out very nice..training and practice make pulling lines easier and a more fliud motion and operation..
        -Egg

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        • #19
          We just started using the triple this year after decades of flat load. I don't have a lot of experience with it yet but the troops seem to be pleased so far.

          Only thing I don't like is the nozzle ends up in the second layer on a 200' crosslay so you have to pull the top section of hose along with the nozzle or you create a mess. We stick a short chunk of the top hose layer through the bail so they have to come off together, then the nozzleman has to pull it back out of the bail after he deploys and before the line is charged. Is there a better way?
          _________DILLIGAF

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          • #20
            As an Engineer I like variety. We have 3 pre-connect Crosslays. The first is 200' of 1 3/4" Conquest loaded as a triple fold with an Automatic Fog Nozzle. The second is 200' of 1 3/4" Conquest loaded as a minute with the first 50 loaded flat. (This way you only take 150' on your shoulder and walk till the last 50' plays out of the bed.) This load has a smooth-bore 1" & 1 1/8" stacked tips - 200 or 250 gpm @ 110 psi or 160 psi. The third is 200' of 2 1/2" with a 1 1/8" smooth-bore nozzle on it. This is loaded as a modified shoulder. The first 100' is loaded flat, and the second is loaded as a minute - Side by side. This way the fire fighter pulls 100' on his shoulder and takes off while the other fire fighter can grab the remaining 100' or the engineer can clear it out of the bed. This variety gives us the best of all worlds. The triple is great if you are parking in front of the house and making an offensive attack through the front door, but sucks if you have to haul the load through obsticals (parked cars, fences, rear of building). When we have those obstacles we pull the minute-man load because you can keep the whole load on your shoulder and it plays out nicely till you reach your destination then flake it out. The reason for the modified shoulder on the 2 1/2" is because we have multiple 3 story motels with no standpipe supply. This allows the guys to pull the 2 1/2" and another to grab the minute man or our high rise pack and go to the third floor landing. Wye the high rise off the 2 1/2" for supply. The trick to everything is to try a variety of loads then get everybody to agree on them so you will always know what you are pulling when you get on scene.
            Firefighter/Paramedic Ron Sanders
            Midvale Fire Department
            Medic Ambulance 22 - A Platoon

            Firefighters, Walking where the Devil Danced!

            This is simply my opinion and does not represent the opinion or view of my employer(s) or any department/agency to which I belong.

            Personal Website: http://RonSanders.Biz Check it Out!

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            • #21
              The Triple AKA "S" is the way!!!

              Yes, it's harder to pack, and if space a factor just move the Engine to a parking Lot or wide street.. and pack it there...

              Use the KISS rule of fire fighting...

              Make it simple for everybody, yes your dept. might know how to pull your hose out, but if it is a large fire and you need help from other dept's, will they know...

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              • #22
                It sounds to me like you don't have a crosslay, or any hosebed load for that matter, problem. It sounds to me like you have an engineer problem. I'd just ask him if he wants to be part of the solution or part of the problem. If you can't, get someone with enough bugles to do it for you...
                ...if you put the handline in the right spot, you won't have to jump out the window...
                -Andy "Nozzles", SQ18, 9-11-01

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                • #23
                  I wish our older guys would learn to accept the Triple Load, but they won't. I personally love it, and so do most of the younger guys. But, for now, we just flat lay our crosslays.
                  JMK271
                  These opinions are my own and not those of the department in which I serve.

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                  • #24
                    WE USE THE TRIPPLE STACK OR BAKER LOAD AS WE CALL IT. LIKE MANY POST BEFORE ME THE BAKER LOAD TAKES A LITTLE EXTRA TIME TO REPACK BUT IT PAYS OFF WHEN YOU DEPLOY THE HOSE. WE PLACE THE BOTTOM TWO SECTIONS OF HOSE INTO THE BELL OF THE NOZZLE TO MAKE SURE THAT ALL THREE SECTIONS ARE PULLED AT THE SAME TIME. IF YOU DONT PULL THE THREE SECTIONS AT THE SAME TIME YOU WILL END UP WITH A MESS AT THE PUMP PANAL.

                    ALSO, MAKE SURE THAT YOU PULL THE LAY COMPLETLY OFF THE APPARATUS BEFORE TRYING TO SEPARATE THE SECTIONS FOR OPERATION.

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                    • #25
                      I n my home dept. we use minute man for our crossylays, and flats for our lines of the back of the engines. In the dept. where i bunk we have the mattydale. I prefer the mattydale... It seems eaiser to pull.
                      stay safe...
                      biv

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                      • #26
                        My full-time job, we use the good old fashioned flat load, We use to use the Triple load, but once a progressive firefighter left our org, the old timers foced us back inot the old ways. Maybe some day we will get to use the triple load again.

                        In my Volley dept, we used the triple load until we started having trouble with not having enough people on hand to put it back on the vehicles, so they went back to the flat load as well
                        Front line since 1983 and still going strong

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                        • #27
                          Hey Flash, it's not a different hoseload you need it's a different pump operator.

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                          • #28
                            Biv... I thought "mattydale" was just another term for a preconnected crosslay. What is a mattydale lay?
                            _________DILLIGAF

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