Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

smooth bore vs straight stream

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Paul Grimwood
    replied
    But there are TWO topics here ntvilleff - the question concerning 3D fog applications was not addressed in the string you mentioned and blaze's question is definitely worth an answer.

    Leave a comment:


  • ntvilleff
    replied
    Geez, we just got done with a string about this.....Reference the topic "How effective is this stream" a few pages back and you could write a book about streams when your done reading the posts.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Grimwood
    replied
    You should also be able to receive a 10,000 word 2000 document instantly that details 3D firefighting by sending a BLANK e-mail to [email protected] - this should arrive back by auto-response.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Grimwood
    replied
    Can I address your question concerning 'getting burned' whilst utilising 3D water-fog applications -

    As with all fog applications inside an occupied compartment (room) the potential for burns comes from (1) Indirect Applications - where the objective is to create 'wet' steam by applying water to hot surfaces such as the walls, ceiling and other items etc; (2) Utilising nozzles that produce extremely fine water particles (below 0.1mm) where the effect is to cause evaporation immediately on exit from the nozzle tip - too near to the operator; (3) Over-zealous use of a water-spray/fog nozzle - applying too much water, again creating 'wet' steam.

    The objective of 3D applications is to avoid excessive contact with hot surfaces using nozzles that produce fine droplets that suspend in the superheated gas layers in the overhead. This can be done by discharging rapid bursts of water in succession, into the gases, on a 30-60 cone spread (depending on the size of compartment). These bursts (termed pulsing) of droplets within the 0.2 to 0.6 mm range are ideal for penetrating into the gas 'pillow' forming and transporting near the ceiling. The effect is to cool and inert the gases, taking them outside their flammable range, producing a 'dry' type of steam under the control of the nozzle operator. This environment is much safer and more comfortable for firefighters to work in and the US Navy tests demonstrate these effects clearly under strict scientific monitoring.

    Two points I would also make - (1) This form of fire attack requires some training (about 30 minutes to 2 hours - depending on skill levels) and an understanding of fire behaviour, including the witnessing of fire gases forming and transporting, usually learned inside a 'can' flashover simulator. (2) Before I attract the opposing views!!! -

    There is nothing better than a smooth-bore (or similar) attack at the base of a fire to extinguish it!!

    But how many times can you actually SEE the base of a fire when you advance into a structure? Better to go armed with the versatility of a combo nozzle and utilise both fog/straight options - depending on circumstances.

    Extensive details concerning 3D firefighting can be found by using keywords in the search tool located at -

    Leave a comment:


  • blazeslayer65
    started a topic smooth bore vs straight stream

    smooth bore vs straight stream

    what do you use, how do you use it and how effective is it? Also has anyone experimented with 3D 30 degree fog attacks? How do you keep your crews from getting burned?

    [ 07-09-2001: Message edited by: blazeslayer65 ]

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X