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What Have you learned Since you've started?

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  • #16
    One that I am always repeating to the new guys:

    "Lefty loosey, Righty Tighty"



    ------------------
    Kevin Sink
    Fair Grove Fire Dept.
    Thomasville, NC USA
    [email protected]

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    • #17
      "If you can keep your head while those around you are losing theirs, you may have misjudged the situation."

      "When the guy who's been on the department longer than you've been alive says: 'you know, you oughta..." listen very carefully and consider it an order."

      "When you make a mistake, don't make excuses or try to reason it away. Admit to it and learn from it. You'll get a lot more milage in the 'earning their respect' department by saying: 'I feel like an idiot, I'm sorry, I'll try not to let it happen again.' than you ever with anything even remotely sounding like an excuse."

      And of course:

      ------------------
      Fire service survival tips:
      1) Cook at 350...
      2) Pump at 150...
      3) When in doubt, isolate and deny entry...
      4) When in trouble, claim ignorance and lack of adult supervision.

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      • #18
        Heres a speech i had to give my senior year in high school for my senior project. It was what i've learned in the fire service...

        What you see on this board in front of you is a list of certifications for training we have received during our time in the fire departments just one of those classes is enough to satisfy the requirements for this project(imagine a poster baord with 20 certificates on it now ok). What these pieces of paper represent isn’t what we truly learned from our time in the fire service. What we have truly learned can’t be expressed on a piece of poster board or a power point presentation. It’s an emotion, a sense of belonging, a feeling of satisfaction, its pride.
        Pride is something you can’t understand until you feel it yourself. You can read about it in books and watch it in movies, but until we joined the fire department we didn’t truly know what it is was. Before the fire department we really didn’t know what it meant to put your heart and soul into something. We had nothing to really to be proud of, we all have shortcomings in school and could do much better if we gave more effort, we did community service only cause we had to, and had not truly achieved much during our life time. The thing about the fire service is, it doesn’t just give you pride, Its something you have to earn, knowing in your heart you gave your best on every call.
        The relationships you develop with your fellow fireman are ones that will last a lifetime. You trust them with your life, and they do the same to you. This develops a strong bond between one another that can only be described as brotherhood. I had been in a couple of months before I became aware of the impact and importance of this brotherhood. This was when I realized the fire service just wasn’t a job; it truly is a community. When a fellow firefighter falls in the line of duty, firefighters across the nation mourn the loss of a brother. I realized this December 3, 1999, the day 6 firemen from Worchester died in the line of duty.
        This is when I realized also what true courage was, 2 firefighters became lost during a search and 4 more firefighters perished in their attempt to find their missing comrades. This showed me how deep the brotherhood truly ran; they gave the ultimate sacrifice for their brothers, this is what courage is.
        Commitment is the key factor in being good at what you do. Someone once told me a fireman’s 2 favorite words are “I quit”, and all three of us have wanted to say these words more then once.
        You have to deal with the death of good people and the destruction people place upon themselves. And probably worst of all you have the see the most innocent of all suffer sometimes, children.
        If we quit, there would be no more waking up at 3 in the morning for drunk drivers who wreck their cars. No more rude people saying “what took so long”, when you know those are the same people who fail to yield to your fire truck when its racing to a different call or the people you know can hear the fire whistle and clearly see your blue light but yet don’t pull over out of pure arrogance. No more dropping everything you’re doing just to stand by for another fire dept. just in case something else were to happen. One quick and easy way to relieve the stress it all creates. Its not something you can just do, you have to live it.
        Countless hours of service, overshadowed by clubs with more school “PR”. When scholarships for community service come around and the nominations go in, how many times do you see the names of firemen? People of higher stature gets these scholarships and awards hands down, even though we do more community service in one week then they do an entire year. We’re risking our lives and they’re collecting soup cans. Even though they get the recognition and scholarships, we feel our reward is much greater; the reward of knowing you have truly helped others in their greatest times of need.

        Rah. thats about it, thats what i learned from the fire service.

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