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Wearing Full PPE

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  • Wearing Full PPE

    I have noticed that some guys/girls don't always wear full PPE even into a structure fire. The most noticable are the guys that don't wear nomex/Pbi hoods. Then there are people who don't wear the chin strap on their helmet. I'm not meaning to bitch I just think it is unsafe. OH one other thing. I think that seat belts count as PPE as well. They should be fastened any time the truck leaves the station.

  • #2
    I agree completly. If I am going to go into a fire, I want every last scrap of protective gear I can get. If they have it, I want it. I would like to come home and see my girl at night, u know?

    ------------------
    "I hate it when someone says something is impossible, because then I have to go and find a way to do it."
    Whatever it is, I didn't do it, and I don't know anything about a fire. That's my story, and I'm sticking to it.
    Stay safe, boys and girls. It's for keeps out there.

    Comment


    • #3
      Some people for what ever reason (tradition, stubbornness, etc)just will never wear all the gear. I personally wear all of it, and wear it correctly. But I guess it is a matter of opinion. I'm not to going to try to force a seasoned Firefighter to wear a hood, or tuck his ears in, or whatever the case may be, but as a Lt. I feel it is my duty to make sure that the new guys learn the right way, and wear all of their equipment as is was meant to be worn. This stuff is to protect you from injury not prove how much of a badass you are by not using it. I know that many others will disagree with me, but so be it, I'm not going to to get in a name calling match, or tell them that they are wrong. It is you own decision as to how safe you want to make this unsafe job.

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      • #4
        Regardless if I don't use a helmet chinstrap or wear my hood all the time or at all doesn't make me a less safer fireman. Some of you are putting too much faith in your personal protective equipment and not knowing how much is too much when your in a fire.

        As far as seatbelt use in the apparatus let's be honest. Officially, yes it should be an SOP when riding, but how many of you really buckle the seatbelt when riding to a call?

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        • #5
          I can remember my dad coming home from fires back in the 70's before the nomex were around. "Yoda Ears" were classic. I think for him it was a pride thing, but I'd rather not consistantly get my ears toasted.

          ------------------
          Mike

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          • #6
            for that question about who wears seatbelts....I would like to say that I wear it everytime i am in the truck as do all the other people i work with.

            Comment


            • #7
              I agree with you about both items....the hood should be worn and i also see the point of putting to much "faith" in the gear..if you can feel it thru the hood then usually it is to hot anyways...but then again if you know the signs of when **** hits the fan..you shouldnt have any problem right?
              now the seatbelt.....yes it should be worn...but really how many captains or firefighters do you see with the belt on with the airpack on?? exactly...the engineer always wears his..
              stay safe brothers

              ------------------
              Engine / Squad Co.# 7

              Comment


              • #8
                I will wear all of my gear into a structure fire, on a roof for ventilation, ontop of the ladder using a ladder-pipe. You never know when that wind will shift . About the chinstrap though, that's a bit of a preference than anything. with the helemts we use, it has that ratcheting piece that tightens to your head and you really don't need a strap... I def. would not wear a strap on my chin with a mask on, if anything I put it right under my visor of my mask. If I fall through a floor, roof or whatnot, I would rather lose my helmet, than both my helmet and scba mask or even risk the chance of breaking my neck... if you see what I'm saying.

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                • #9
                  nobull... good topic. I am a firm believer of wearing hoods. It could be that it's just the way I was taught and I'm used to it. Although, I do recall a fire where someone grabbed my hood out of my jacket (I guess they thought they needed it more than I did) so I had to go without, it took some getting used to but I can now see why some of the "old timers" do without.

                  As far as seat belts go, If you are in a front seat (engineer, officer, ambulance driver, etc) I say wear it all the time every time. If you're in a pack seat, well, clip it after you get your pack straps straightened out. If you're going to a non-fire incident where you won't need packs, wear it. It can be a pain but I'd rather have to deal with a seat belt than deal with the injuries that can result from not wearing one. Even a minor accident can cause some pretty good injuries if you're bouncing around in the cab with crap flying everywhere. Why take the chance of getting injured over stupidity? Be safe all.

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                  • #10
                    Don’t’ be stupid wear your gear! The fires of today burn hotter than those of the 70’s. The release of BTU’s in today’s fires double the BTU’ of yesterdays fires. Any rookie knows this. If you are an officer it is your responsibility to ensure that everyone goes home safe this means tell the veteran to wear all his gear. If you do not do this then you have no business being a leader. As for the helmet, they are designed to have the top shell break away if they sustain a hit (not sure of the lbs. to do this) check with your local dealer or call the manufacturer. The gear is designed to protect you. If you feel that it protects you too much then use Nomex gear then you will feel heat. As stated in an earlier post "look for the warning signs of heat build up" (rollover, thick pushing smoke, and heat near the floor) don’t be a statistic go home the same way you came to work.

                    David Polikoff

                    ------------------
                    Visit the Firefighters Page at www.workingfire.net

                    [This message has been edited by David Polikoff (edited 04-21-2001).]

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Full PPE must be worn to all jobs, this is our SOP and if you don't wear it then you are not covered for workers compensation. We have hoods, gloves and what you guys call bunker gear, and we have to have it all on before we even get into the truck. The gear is designed to protect us not hinder us.

                      As for seat belts, over here it is the law and the officers won't let the truck roll out until everybody has their seat belt on, no if's but's or maybe's.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm also one for wearing my full PPE during interior operations. But this is one of those arguments that can go round and round forever. While I wear a hood, my father will not. I've used a hood from day one, and guys that came in with my father hate them. Its just one of those things. But I have to say this, being a truckie, I will wear my PPE when venting, but do not automatically have it on. I have everything ready to go if the smoke gets thick, but I find it very cumbersome and a little more time consuming to ventilate while breathing air. I want to get up there with my partner vent and get off if I can't do it off the aerial. I also do not think that we put to much faith into our PPE, to me it is unsafe not to have faith in the equipment you are using. For me its even more so with high angle rescue. If you don't have faith in what your wearing, then you've got problems. I have faith that the PPE I wear will protect me to the level that it is intended for use. Nothing more, nothing less. As far as the seatbelt thing goes, yes we all wear them. All of our SCOTT 4.5 harnesses on the trucks have the SCBA seatbelts on them. I don't know how strong they really are with a body attached, but its better then nothing.

                        -------------------------------------------
                        The above is my opinion only, it doesn't reflect that of any dept./agency I work for, deal with, or am a member of.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I agree 100%...All of the Safety Equipment mentioned {Hoods, Chin Straps, Seat Belts, Ect... were made for a reason. And I don't see a reason why they sholdn't be used. When you get dispatched the PPE goes on -- Bases upon the nature of the incident and the descretion of the OIC some equipment can be removed {At least thats the way we work it} -- Seems to work well

                          ------------------
                          "S.F.C. Home of the New Jersey State Fire Firemen's Association Convention Champions 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, and 2000

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If I'm going into a situation with visible fire/charged atmosphere, I double check myself to ensure everything is on/tucked/fastened, but I've also arrived to housefires where other engine companies have already put the brunt of the fire out and all we have is a somewhat smokey condition. front door is open, building is already well ventilated, little to no heat. These are the times that I'm a little more lax about my hood, and perhaps I shouldn't be that way.



                            ------------------
                            FF. Mike Burnes
                            Whitehall Fire Division

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Our dept. says that you WILL wear all of your PPE when you roll. Once you get on scene, the officer may elect to ok you taking off this or that, but it's his call. I'm fairly new, so it's the policy that "I've grown up with", but I think it's a good one. In fact, wearing the full gear (hood, etc.) saved my ears, what hair I do have, etc. last night, and that was just a training fire. Suffice it to say that things got a bit out of hand, and I was glad that I had it on.
                              Be safe!! ;-)

                              Comment

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