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Tools for plaster and lath.

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by Chenzo View Post
    I know that routine....
    Weren't YOU in charge of the last T-shirt order?

    Leave a comment:


  • Chenzo
    replied
    Originally posted by conrad427 View Post
    Although the last time they decided to buy new t shirts, it took a year to decide on a color.
    I know that routine....

    Leave a comment:


  • conrad427
    replied
    Good point, might be able to sell the idea to the dept.

    Although the last time they decided to buy new t shirts, it took a year to decide on a color.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chenzo
    replied
    Originally posted by conrad427 View Post
    Thanks for the response guys. I like the look of the Boston tool. I am not a tool junkie, just did not get much out of the Pike in this situation. Might not be needed enough to justify buying a tool.

    Like I said, might not be needed enough to warrant an outlay of cash. But heck, they are not too expensive.
    For the relatively low price of hand tools, I wouldn't limit yourself to only carrying one type of hook. The POC FD (small budget) that both Fyred and I are on have a myriad of hooks (Standard Pike in various lengths,, Boston Rakes in various lengths, NY Roof hooks in various lengths, a few LA Rubbish Hooks, a San Francisco hook, and possibly a couple I've missed), not because any of us are tool junkies, but because it offers options and versatility for the multitude of different situations we could find ourselves in.

    Leave a comment:


  • conrad427
    replied
    Thanks for the response guys. I like the look of the Boston tool. I am not a tool junkie, just did not get much out of the Pike in this situation. Might not be needed enough to justify buying a tool.

    I guess I understand what you are saying CaptnJak.

    My only problem at this fire was the fire resistant board that was an inch above the lathe. I could not get the hook above the lathe to pull it down. Looking for something that had a right angle in it to get underneath the lathe to pull it down. Wore myself out just bashing the dang stuff until I could get under it.

    Like I said, might not be needed enough to warrant an outlay of cash. But heck, they are not too expensive.

    I am going to buy my own Rouge Hoe, a pulaski is too damn short.

    Leave a comment:


  • RFDACM02
    replied
    We carry both the NYC hooks and Boston rakes and for lathe and plaster the Rake is easier.

    Leave a comment:


  • captnjak
    replied
    The Boston Rake does appear to be the best tool for wood lath and plaster due to it's simple design and the length of the tip.

    The LA Trash Hook does not look like it would be effective on wood lath and plaster ceilings. Also lower portions of walls. It seems to me the angle of approach would be awkward. It does appear to be a good sheetrock hook.

    Best tactic is to rotate hook so head is parallel with wood lath and plunge it through next to stud. Then rotate so tip is at right angle to lath and pull. Keep working your way down wall or across ceiling without stopping until end of bay. Use short controlled strokes.

    The inability to easily plunge through wall or ceiling is what makes the trash hook look awkward to me for wood lath and plaster.

    Metal lath is another story. I think we should just go to power saws.

    Full disclosure. I've never used a Boston Rake or LA Trash Hook on wood lath and plaster. Just going by the look of the tool vs method we use.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by FWDbuff View Post
    Use a BOSTON RAKE one time on plaster and lathe and you'll never, ever use anything else.

    (and as much as I hate to admit something from the left coast works....An LA Trash Hook is a close second.)
    I was hoping someone would mention the Boston Rake. It is amazing. I like the LA trash hook for drywall too. It takes big chunks all at once.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Use a BOSTON RAKE one time on plaster and lathe and you'll never, ever use anything else.

    (and as much as I hate to admit something from the left coast works....An LA Trash Hook is a close second.)

    Leave a comment:


  • slackjawedyokel
    replied
    If you are talking wood lathe/plaster -I have found two guys with new York hooks, working side by side, be sure to "lever the hook against the stud. Work top down. Now the metal lathe - tough -best I have found is chopping it in small sections with a flat head axe then pulling it with a New York hook.

    Leave a comment:


  • conrad427
    started a topic Tools for plaster and lath.

    Tools for plaster and lath.

    Spent most of the afternoon pulling ceilings and busting walls in a 100 year plus two story wood frame today. Chimney fire.

    Saved the old bugger, but anyway, is there something different for working with this stuff?

    Had a flat head, halligan and a pike pole. Worked well, but was thinking there must be something different for such things.

    Around the big brick chimney was a lot of cement board? underneath the lath only an inch or two underneath. It was a bugger getting that pulled down on the tall ceilings. When I could get underneath the lath it was easy as always with the pike pole, just could not get under it most of the time.

    Is there some other tools you guys like to use for this stuff.

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