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Perhaps this might be of some interest?

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  • Perhaps this might be of some interest?

    With more and more departments going to portable computers, for things such as maps, reports etc etc... in the apparatus, it brought a question or two to my mind. To my knowledge, there isn't a program out there that has moved something like the Hazmat response book to the computer. I know there are acrobat copies availbe, but what if there were a program that, all you needed to do was type in the placard number, or name, or type of chemical and it would present you with all the information you needed to know. Would this be of any interest to anyone? Is there any other kind of task we do, that could be amde easier if it were brought to the computer?

    Any thoughts or insight into the matter would e most appreciated. Stay safe!

  • #2
    I believe that CAMEO does some of those functions. I have never presonally used it but from all of the hazmat classes I have taken CAMEO was mentioned in all of them.

    ------------------
    npfire/meic

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    • #3
      Ok, I hadn't heard of it but I'll take a look around for it. Thanks .

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      • #4
        There is a NIOSH haz-mat program available for the palm pilot or similar PDA's. It's available at emspda.com, don't know what the cost for that module is though.

        [This message has been edited by Rescue 21 (edited 04-02-2001).]

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        • #5
          The reason I started the post, was I am starting to learn some basic programming, for the very reason of writing my own apps, I suppose for special purposes. I guess I was just more curious to know what kinds of programs might be useful to you in the emergency services, just to give me some future ideas . I suppose I should have better said that .

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          • #6
            I have used Cameo...It isn't very "user friendly", and once you get it figured out it isn't too bad. You can order it off of the EPA and OSHA websites. I don't think it is that good overall. There is bound to be some better material out there.

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            • #7
              We use CAMEO along with ALOHA, MARPLOT, and the chemical reactivity worksheet. True it takes a bit of practice to get used to but overall I love the ability to go from one to the next to the next without losing the info. They allow you to look up the information about the chemical in CAMEO, and ALOHA and then import it to MARPLOT to see where it's going to go. I find that really cool. You can therefore get the MSDS info, emergency response information and most likely avenue of travel information along with a map of the area if you take the time to download the updates. But as stated before it does require quite a bit of know how and patience to operate the programs. throw in a copy of ADOBE and the ERG on diskette and you have cut the amount of books you have to look this stuff up in to none - unless you want to verify what the computer is telling you (always a good idea until you are more comfortable with it!)

              [This message has been edited by FirescueBob (edited 04-03-2001).]

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