Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Discussion: Industrial Fire Departments?

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Discussion: Industrial Fire Departments?

    Within my town there is a manufacturing facility that operates it own Fire Rescue Department independent from the city. It is a industrial/private paid fire department with a full-time staff. The apparatus roster consists of one quint with a 1500gpm pump, a 500gal. tank and a 95' platform aerial; one ALS ambulance and one TSU (Tactical Service Unit - i.e Rescue Squad) which as an assortment of Hurst tools, air bags, saws, equipment for confined space and high angle rescues, entrapment etc. Aside from day to day stuff such as fire/safety inspections and maitenence, typical calls in the past have been men caught in a machine, contents fires, techincal rescue from either high places or confined space and medical emergencies. The Quint is staffed with a crew of 4; the TSU is staffed with 2; The ambulance is staffed with two Paramedics. The assignments get rotated but there is always a Paramedic on duty at all times and the other firemen are trained to the EMT-D level. The department responds to all emergencies within the facility and if additional units are needed then my (city) fire department will respond. We also call on their department for firehouse coverage, multiple alarms and mass casualty emergencies. From time to time we conduct training together.

    If you are a fireman for an industrial fire department, how organised is it, in other words are you full-time or on call as a responder? Is your department affiliated with the IAFF, or are you represented by the local unions within the company or are you not represented at all?

    If you are a career or volunteer fireman, what are your thoughts on having a completely independent privately funded fire department working within your response area/district? Do you feel that large manufacturing facilities in your district should have their own fire department? Do you think you would have more funding available and more call volume if there was no independent fire department for the facility? Are the cost benefits for a company to maintain it's own fire department compared to relying on the city fire department? What are your thoughts?

    Glen B.

  • #2
    To be honest with you, I actually like the idea of major industrial complexes having their own fire department/ fire brigade. It's nice to know that when you roll up onto the scene you will have people intimately familiar with the environment you will be entering and the hazards contained therein. Even if you choose to just use them as technical consultants, it's nice to have extra manpower there (especially the trained, ready, and willing variety). The key is being able to work together in a productive professional manner. The best way to accomplish that, I feel, is to treat them as a mutual aid company, i.e. train together, share standards and qualifications for personnel, and interact socially outside of the work environment. All of these things can contribute to developing a level of trust and mutual respect. BUT I do feel that the city department should be advised of all events occurring inside the complex that the company's crews are responding to and that the powers that be in the city department should have the ultimate say so as far as initiating their own response, even if they weren't requested. Most companies in my area that have fire brigades realize that the city's department is bound by law and liability to respond to all incidents in our jurisdiction and that we, as the city department, have the ultimate say so as to what actions are taken. In other words the city's OIC should be able to assume command from the company's OIC if he feels it is warranted because the city has the responsibility to provide fire protection to all tax payers, personal or corporate.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've worked with them (peripherally) in a couple of cases. They can be good and bad. I agree wholeheartedly with Eng522ine. Work with them. Train with them. Pick their brains 'cause they know what's where (and what's dangerous).

      One I worked with (indirectly) was at a chemical plant in KC. One of our FFs was a research chemist there. When they had a major acid leak (w/toxic fumes), the city FD responded, and we got called M/A for station cover, so I never got there, but.... The city guys really appreciated having trained personnel who knew what was leaking, and what its specific hazards were.

      Then again, another was at a petroleum refinery. They had a tendency to NOT call us, thinking "we'll handle this, and not get them involved". I don't know if they were afraid of investigations turning up EPA violations or what, but when they had a major incident, the City got a delayed response, and the lost a major portion of the plant. I 'think' that the management learned its lesson, but you never know.

      Just make SURE they CALL you - every time - YOU decide whether to roll in or not.

      Comment


      • #4
        Are these departments comparable in pay, hours, benifits?

        Comment

        300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

        Collapse

        Upper 300x250

        Collapse

        Taboola

        Collapse

        Leader

        Collapse
        Working...
        X