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Good Training Drills you know!?

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  • backsteprescue123
    replied
    We have been doing a few of these drills once a month recently.....


    http://downloads.pennnet.com/fe/dril...fpa1410sum.pdf

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by tree68 View Post
    Yep! And not so much if you have people in the background discouraging same.
    Too true. I have been there both as a training officer and as a tech college fire service instructor. Nothing can be more frustrating than having a group that is in to the training you are giving being distracted, disillusioned, and finally driven away by naysayers and false prophets.

    I have tried to minimize that by involving as many people as I can from the FD. I ask them what they want to train on, I ask them for ideas and thoughts on what we just did. I INCLUDE EVERYONE from the newest guys to the saltiest of veterans. It is hard to be a naysayer when YOU are being used as an "expert."

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  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
    It is fun to do training when people show up enthusiastic and participate willingly.
    Yep! And not so much if you have people in the background discouraging same.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    On one of my POC FDs last night we did an in town pumper relay drill.

    I had the attack engine lay from a hydrant, just 100 feet of 5 inch because the length of the hose wan't the issue, getting the procedure right was. They pulled 2 - 1 3/4 attack lines and began flowing water from its 1000 gallon water tank. I had the supply engine wait 3 minutes before they responded to the hydrant. Once there they made the hydrant and supplied the attacks engine's 5 inch line.

    Right here we found a MAJOR problem. The attack engine has an air operated valve for the rear intake. With the supply engine pumping 100 psi the air operated valve could not open under that water pressure. When we dropped the pressure to below 50 psi it would open. From now on we will initially supply that line at around 20 psi and boost as the attack engine opens the valve.

    Once the water supply was established we added a TFT Blitzfire. We also worked on hoseline handling skills.

    We ran the drill twice and things went well.

    I am truly enjoying being the training officer of this FD. The chief has given me free rein to do what I want for training. I have asked for input on what the guys want training on and I have gotten some great input and support. It is fun to do training when people show up enthusiastic and participate willingly.

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  • Dickey
    replied
    Here are the two most beneficial trainings I have done. Both were easy to teach and set up yet taught the biggest fundamental lessons a firefighter should know.

    SCBA Basketball - Divide your department into even teams. Make sure they dress for playing basketball such as shorts or loose fitting clothes. Make sure everyone is wearing SCBA but not on air until right at the jump ball. Play basketball with everyone on air including members of your team that are not playing on the sidelines. When people run out of air, they are out of the game. The team with the last person standing on air wins. This teaches them how much air they can really go through in a short amount of time when they are working. Motivates people to get into shape. It also teaches air conservation and exactly how much air you actually have when the bell goes off. We have guys that suck the bottle dry, literally. It's cheap, fun and just be careful not have fingers between SCBA bottles that bang together!!!

    Mayday/Self Rescue Training- Find a large open area with not so many obstructions such as an auditorium, gym, or we use the ice rink when it doesn't have ice in it. Put a single firefighter with a blacked out mask, very low air in an SCBA just before the bell rings, and spin them around a few times. Disorient them enough that they don't remember the way they came in. Put them in the middle of the room and tell them they have just been separated from their crew and what is their next move.

    The goal is to have them call a MAYDAY right away per your own SOG's and then see what they do.

    The results are very interesting. Some will crawl to a wall then try to find an exit. Some will call for help on the radio and some won't even activate their PASS alarms!! What I did in that situation was call for a MAYDAY, activate my PASS and took things out of my pockets to throw. I threw one thing one way and listened to see how far it went before it hit a wall. I did this in all 4 directions until I determined where the closest wall was. I crawled to it and then searched for an exit. You would be amazed at how many guys would have died in that scenario. It really brings it home and makes you think.

    Do a department survey on what they would like to see and then incorporate the "have to do" trainings with the "like to do" trainings.

    Leave a comment:


  • GTRider245
    replied
    Originally posted by JohnVBFD View Post
    I see what you're saying, but just can't help but wonder if maybe this shouldn't be the type of drill that we do more often than once a year?

    Not sure of your fire load or run volume so don't take it as criticism.

    We pull lines, throw ladders, find a spot for forcible entry, set up supply to the master stream on the ladder all montly in house, plus the added required monthly training that the Fire Training Center sends out.
    I should have rephrased. I was referring to my volunteer department, which meets weekly for about 2-3 hours on average. We do the particular drill in question at a MINIMUM of once a year, but that is not to say that that is the only time the hose comes off the truck. They get thier hands on the vital equipment a good amount for the time we have to work with (in my opinion anyway).

    No criticism taken- I can see how that could have been taken the wrong way.

    Leave a comment:


  • NFD-Firefighter
    replied
    We sometimes do "dead" fires. We "tone out" for a structure fire at one of our local businesses. We head over there and set everything up as if we were responding to a real fire... stretch attack lines, flow water, throw ladders... everything you would do if there was a a real fire... just no chopping holes...

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnVBFD
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    I do this with my guys at least annually right before thier yearly live burn, just to make sure they remember how to advance hose and to keep it from becoming an issue in the burn building.
    I see what you're saying, but just can't help but wonder if maybe this shouldn't be the type of drill that we do more often than once a year?

    Not sure of your fire load or run volume so don't take it as criticism.

    We pull lines, throw ladders, find a spot for forcible entry, set up supply to the master stream on the ladder all montly in house, plus the added required monthly training that the Fire Training Center sends out.

    Leave a comment:


  • backsteprescue123
    replied
    Originally posted by ChiefKN View Post
    This is going to sound stupid... but it was fun and opened some eyes.

    Have a radio/maps/streets/water source/size up drill.

    Split your guys up and assign them to the apparatus.

    Go to an ops radio channel or if you have a dedicated frequency use that.

    Each crew will rotate into the officer riding position. All responses are cold (no lights, no sirens, regular driving).

    They will be "dispatched" by the OIC of the drill to a location in your district, the firefighter in the officer seat will have to guide the operator by using the map, street index, whatever to the location, position the apparatus, give a complete sizeup (including nearest water source) over the radio. All of this should be compliant with good radio procedures.

    Switch "officers" and repeat.

    Bring them all back and critique. Be even better if you have it on tape and then you critique.

    We found that our guys had a better respect for knowing the response area, water supplies, and how they talked on the radio.

    You'd be shocked at what you see and hear. We had a guy who should have said, "Engine 53 responding" and said "Engine 53 in pursuit". I kid you not. He was serious (and clueless).
    We do drills similar to this also and its amazing at how some people who have been on for 20 years don't know 90% of the streets in our first due or even how to use a map book. Thank the lord that these people rarely show up and when they do they are most certainly in the back.

    Some other ideas (will include some that have been already mentioned)

    - Ground Ladders (you can never drill too hard on this) and there are always new tricks you can use to make throwing them easier. Throwing a 24 footer should be a one man task but I know plenty of places who consider this a company task and you will see 3 or 4 guys doing it. Unacceptable.

    - VES

    - Standpipe Ops (if thats something you deal with)

    - Different types of search- our go-to search tactic is the oriented man search and we drill on it pretty hard. Some of the guys with 20 years on can't seem to shake the boot/wall search method so we try to get them used to doing the oriented search.

    - Pulling hoselines- Another thing you can never practice enough. Something I tell our guys all the time "Amateurs practice until they get it right, professionals practice until they can't get it wrong"

    - MVA Ops - this can include actual extrication but we have found that though people may know the extrication skills they are lacking in some of the other areas needed on an accident scene. We have recently started drilling pretty hard on the size up and stabilization phases of accidents. Size up doesn't only mean evaluating what resources you will need and how many injuries there are. Size up includes talking to your EMS personnel and evaluating the damage to the car and the Pt's complaints.

    ** For example- Side impact collision. Pt is the restrained driver in a vehicle that was struck on the drivers side. Moderate damage to his door but the other car is not in the way. Pt is c/o some pretty moderate to severe neck/back pain. Sure you could open the passenger door and try to take them out that way, but unless there is a bench seat, the center console is probably going to be very detrimental to your patient. Even though you have access from the other side of the vehicle, it is in the patients best interest to take the drivers door or maybe do a sidewall removal depending on seat positioning.

    - Relay Pumping and Drafting- Always a good one. Our first due is approx. 60% hydranted and 40% non, but a good majority of our fires occur in hydranted areas so it does not hurt to practice setting up tanker shuttles and relay pumping operations. We had one guy with quite a few years on who didn't know what a relief valve was, how to operate it, or what it was for.

    - Power Tools- You might be amazed at how many people on your department know how to check a saw for fuel but have no idea how to turn it on or troubleshoot it. (If you don't have this problem I am jealous! ) Go over how to check the chain and tighten or loosen it if required. How to disassemble it for cleaning, etc. Also go over any other power tools such as the hydraulic rescue tool pump, fans, etc.

    - Ventilation- Usually the drill after the power tool drill, so people have had a little refresher on how to operate the saws then we get them up on the roof simulator cutting vent holes. (And after the cutting is done we have them put their recently learned cleaning skills to the test). We also push pretty hard on horizontal ventilation. Whenever the topic of ventilation is brought up, most people immediately think "we gotta get to the roof and cut a hole". Which is good but with minimum manpower it might be just a beneficial to take a few windows as the attack team is making its push. Then once more companies arrive on scene, you can get someone to the roof.

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  • iverson
    replied
    practice make perfect.

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  • RFD21C
    replied
    Go to a local playground at a nonbusy time. Advance hose lines through the various parts of the playground. Plenty of corners, tight spots, etc. Great for teaching members to work multiple corners when advancing lines.

    Leave a comment:


  • RobinsonG
    replied
    My department is Volunteer, we are in a 100% hydranted area, commercial/residential buildings with mostly type III houses but an increasing number of type 5

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  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    Originally posted by RobinsonG View Post
    My station has become somewhat complacent with drilling. I am trying to bring up new drills and new things to do but I'm still newer so I only know so much. What are some good drills and ways to train you have done or heard of?

    stay safe

    Back to the Basics.

    Big Box Training.

    Mayday - Firefighter Down.

    Hose layouts - Forward and Reverse.

    Ladder Placement.

    VES.


    Just to name a few.

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    The best part about running that drill was the fact that everyone found it wothwhile, I actually had people thank me for running the drill, and not one person complained about it. If half the drills I run go that smooth I will be a happy camper.

    Leave a comment:


  • GTRider245
    replied
    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
    We did a fun drill at one of my POC FDs the other night. We hooked to the hydrant in the station with 1 3/4 inch hose and had to advance up and down the apparatus bays in between the fire apparatus. It surely did teach about spacing the crew out on the line, stockpiling hose at the corners, and most of all working together.
    I do this with my guys at least annually right before thier yearly live burn, just to make sure they remember how to advance hose and to keep it from becoming an issue in the burn building.

    Leave a comment:

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