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About Time--Khalid Sheikh Mohammed

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  • DeputyChiefGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
    Screw that. Give the Navy some Gunnery practice. It's a LONG swim back to the Mainland. T.C.
    Already covered, Tim... my post just a few slots above yours...

    Hey.. the sharks in the Indian Ocean are hungry.. turn their boat into "marine swiss cheese" and let "Jaws" take care of the rest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by FWDbuff View Post
    I wouldn't even bring them aboard ship when spotted......

    "RAMMING SPEED! SOUND COLLISION!"
    Screw that. Give the Navy some Gunnery practice. It's a LONG swim back to the Mainland. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • E40FDNYL35
    replied
    http://www.firehouse.com/forums/showthread.php?t=120283

    Leave a comment:


  • The nots so new FNG
    replied
    Originally posted by 105 View Post
    I can understand that sentiment. There is a huge difference being on the outside looking in, as I am, and being part of the situation from the beginning. Kind of hard to sit back and be detached when you see the sonofabitch who caused the problem sitting in a warm jailcell while others are sick and dying, or dead.

    Here's hoping the conclusion of the trial brings some sense of closure, or at least the ability to begin to move on.
    You seem to have this misguided notion that everyone in the world is entitled to our civilian justice system.

    The case above is about at best and enemy combatant. You can make strong arguements for being a spy or sabatuor instead. By the rules of war, spies can be shot on sight. This is a war crimes case, not a civil case.

    For the record - they could try them in the Hague and I would be OK with it.

    This is NOT a criminal case. It never was and never should be.

    As for the Somali pirates - we need to grow a set and basically make it a death sentence to attack an American ship or take an American hostage. If the pirate know they will die instead of getting paid for taking an American, they will seek other 'softer' targets where they will get paid.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeputyChiefGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by 105 View Post
    The best thing that could happen to a Somali pirate is being tried in a US courtroom, and sent to jail for life.

    Sure as hell beats living in Somalia.
    Hey.. the sharks in the Indian Ocean are hungry.. turn their boat into "marine swiss cheese" and let "Jaws" take care of the rest.
    Last edited by DeputyChiefGonzo; 04-08-2011, 08:37 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by donethat View Post
    The Somali Pirates are the next ones that need to be put before a military tribunal for Piracy on the High Seas. Of course I would toss them overboard when they are caught, but some bleeding heart libs would cry about that.
    I wouldn't even bring them aboard ship when spotted......

    "RAMMING SPEED! SOUND COLLISION!"

    Leave a comment:


  • 105
    replied
    Originally posted by donethat View Post
    The Somali Pirates are the next ones that need to be put before a military tribunal for Piracy on the High Seas. Of course I would toss them overboard when they are caught, but some bleeding heart libs would cry about that.
    The best thing that could happen to a Somali pirate is being tried in a US courtroom, and sent to jail for life.

    Sure as hell beats living in Somalia.

    Leave a comment:


  • donethat
    replied
    Pirates

    The Somali Pirates are the next ones that need to be put before a military tribunal for Piracy on the High Seas. Of course I would toss them overboard when they are caught, but some bleeding heart libs would cry about that.

    Leave a comment:


  • 105
    replied
    Originally posted by E40FDNYL35 View Post
    again you as a lawyer have your thinking and me as a fireman and 9/11/01 survivor have mine. i have no sympathy for this skumbag. he is not a u.s. civilian he has no rights in a u.s. court system.
    I can understand that sentiment. There is a huge difference being on the outside looking in, as I am, and being part of the situation from the beginning. Kind of hard to sit back and be detached when you see the sonofabitch who caused the problem sitting in a warm jailcell while others are sick and dying, or dead.

    Here's hoping the conclusion of the trial brings some sense of closure, or at least the ability to begin to move on.

    Leave a comment:


  • E40FDNYL35
    replied
    Originally posted by 105 View Post
    What can I say - I don't believe in letting emotion rule my life on important subjects.
    again you as a lawyer have your thinking and me as a fireman and 9/11/01 survivor have mine. i have no sympathy for this skumbag. he is not a u.s. civilian he has no rights in a u.s. court system.

    Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is a Pakistani in U.S. custody in Guantánamo Bay for acts of terrorism, including mass murder of civilians. He was charged on February 11, 2008, with war crimes and murder by a U.S. military commission and faces the death penalty if convicted. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was a member of Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda organization, although he lived in Kuwait rather than Afghanistan, heading al-Qaeda's propaganda operations from sometime around 1999. The 9/11 Commission Report said that he was "the principal architect of the 9/11 attacks." He is also know to have confessed to a role in many of the most significant terrorist plots over the last twenty years, including the World Trade Center 1993 bombings, the Operation Bojinka plot, an aborted 2002 attack on the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles, the Bali nightclub bombings, the failed bombing of American Airlines Flight 63, the Millennium Plot, and the murder of Daniel Pearl. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was captured in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on March 1, 2003, by the Pakistani ISI, possibly in a joint action with agents of the American Diplomatic Security Service, and has been in U.S. custody since that time. On December 8, 2008, Mohammed and four co-defendants sent a note to the military judge expressing their desire to confess and plead guilty.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChiefKN
    replied
    Originally posted by 105 View Post
    What can I say - I don't believe in letting emotion rule my life on important subjects.
    Its not about emotion, its about understanding the impact on victims and their survivors.

    And you know what? There will be more terrorist attacks. Undoubtedly. Are you willing to utterly strip your system of justice in a futile attempt to prevent them?
    You are making a huge leap, with that argument. OUR system of justice remains intact. These people are not covered by OUR system of justice (meaning the civilian courts).

    These military tribunals have been a part of OUR system of justice for centuries.

    Someone earlier said terrorists hate you for your freedoms.... seems you are willingly giving them up in an attempt to stay safe. Kinda sounds to me like that was their plan all along....
    Extreme point of view. Its not all or none.

    Oh - and as far as quotes from the founding fathers go:
    Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.
    Again... noon is advocating changing OUR justice system.

    Leave a comment:


  • 105
    replied
    Originally posted by E40FDNYL35 View Post
    Touching?????? That's pretty f'n cold.
    What can I say - I don't believe in letting emotion rule my life on important subjects.

    Yes, they can try terrorists in the civilian court as they have done so under the Clinton administration in the case involving those who blasted the basement of the World Trade Center. The terrorists, however, came back a few years later and destroyed both towers of the WTC. So, it was a successful civilian trial, but we lost over 3000 lives later. Good luck with another civilian trial.
    And you know what? There will be more terrorist attacks. Undoubtedly. Are you willing to utterly strip your system of justice in a futile attempt to prevent them?

    Someone earlier said terrorists hate you for your freedoms.... seems you are willingly giving them up in an attempt to stay safe. Kinda sounds to me like that was their plan all along....

    Oh - and as far as quotes from the founding fathers go:
    Those who would give up Essential Liberty to purchase a little Temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by E40FDNYL35 View Post
    Joseph Agnello, Lt. Brian Ahern, Eric Allen, Richard Allen, Capt. James Amato, Calixto Anaya Jr., Joseph Angelini Sr., Joseph Angelini Jr., Faustino Apostol Jr., David Arce, Louis Arena, Carl Asaro, Lt. Gregg Atlas, Gerald Atwood, Matthew Barnes, Gerald Baptiste, A.C. Gerard Barbara, Arthur Barry, Lt. Steven Bates, Carl Bedigian, Stephen Belson, John Bergin, Paul Beyer, Peter Biefeld, Brian Bilcher, Carl Bini, Christopher Blackwell, Michael Bocchino, Frank Bonomo, Gary Box, Michael Boyle, Kevin Bracken, Michael Brennan, Peter Brennan, Capt. Daniel Brethel, Capt. Patrick Brown, Capt. Vincent Brunton, Capt. William Burke Jr, Andrew Brunn, F.M. Ronald Bucca, Greg Buck, A.C. Donald Burns, John Burnside, Thomas Butler, Patrick Byrne, George Cain, Salvatore Calabro, Capt. Frank Callahan, Michael Cammarata, Brian Cannizzaro, Dennis Carey, Michael Carlo, Michael Carroll, Peter Carroll, Thomas Casoria, Michael Cawley, Vernon Cherry, Nicholas Chiofalo, John Chipura, Michael Clarke, Steven Coakley, Tarel Coleman, John Collins, Robert Cordicce, Ruben Correa, James Coyle, Robert Crawford, Lt. John Crisci, B.C. Dennis A. Cross, Thomas Cullen III, Robert Curatolo, Lt. Edward D'Atri, Michael Dauria, Scott Davidson, Edward Day, B.C. Thomas DeAngelis, Manuel Delvalle, Martin Demeo, David Derubbio, Lt. Andrew Desperito, Dennis Devlin, Gerard Dewan, George Dipasquale, Lt. Kevin Donnelly, Lt. Kevin Dowdell, B.C. Ray Downey, Gerald Duffy, Capt. Martin Eagan Jr., Michael Elferis, Francis Esposito, Lt. Michael Esposito, Robert Evans, B.C. Jack Fanning, Capt. Thomas Farino, Terrance Farrell, Capt. Joseph Farrelly, Deputy Comm. William Feehan, Lee Fehling, Alan Feinberg, Frank Fiore, Michael Fiore, Lt. John Fischner, Andre Fletcher, John Florio, Lt. Michael Fodor, Thomas Foley, David Fontana, Robert Foti, Andrew Fredricks, Lt. Peter Freund, Thomas Gambino Jr., Chief of Dept. Peter Ganci Jr., Lt. Charles Garbarini, Thomas Gardner,Thomas Garner, Matthew Garvey, Bruce Gary, Gary Geidel, B.C. Edward Geraghty, Denis Germain, James Giberson, Ronnie Gies, Paul Gill, Lt. Vincent Giammona, Lt. John Ginley, Jeffery Giordano, John Giordano (1), Keith Glascoe, James Gray, B.C. Joe Grzelak, Jose Guadalupe,Lt. Geoffrey Guja, Lt. Joseph Gullickson, David Halderman, Lt. Vincent Halloran, Robert Hamilton, Sean Hanley, Thomas Hannafin, Dana Hannon, Daniel Harlin, Lt. Harvey Harrell, Lt. Stephen Harrell, Capt.Thomas Haskell Jr., Timothy Haskell, Michael Haub, Vincent Halloran, Capt. Terry Hatton, Lt. Mike Healey, John Heffernan, Ronnie Henderson, Joseph Henry, William Henry, Thomas Hetzel, Capt. Brian Hickey, Lt. Tim Higgins, John Hohmann, Thomas Holohan, Joseph Hunter, Capt. Walter Hynes, Jonathan Ielpi, Capt. Fredrick Ill Jr., William Johnston, Andrew Jordan, Karl Joseph, Lt. Anthony Jovic, Angel Juarbe Jr., Fr. Mychal Judge, Vincent Kane, B.C. Charles Kasper, Paul Keating, Thomas Kelly (L15), Thomas Kelly (L105), Richie Kelly Jr. (L11), Thomas Kennedy, Lt. Ronald T. Kerwin, Michael Kiefer, Robert King Jr., William Krukowski, Scott Kopytko, Kenneth Kumpel, Thomas Kuveikis, David Laforge, William Lake, Robert Lane, Peter Langone, Scott Larsen, Lt. Joseph G. Leavey, Neil Leavy, Daniel Libretti, Carlos Lillo (FDNY EMS B-49), Robert Linnane, Michael Lynch (L4), Michael Lynch (E40), Michael Lyons, Patrick Lyons, Joseph Maffeo, William Mahoney, Joseph Maloney, Kenneth Marino, Lt. Charles Margiotta, B.C. Joseph Marchbanks Jr., John Marshell, Lt. Peter Martin, Lt. Paul Martini, Joseph Mascali, Keithroy Maynard, Brian Mcaleese, John Mcavoy, Thomas Mccann, Lt. William McGinn, B.C. William McGovern, Dennis Mchugh, Robert McMahon, Robert McPadden, Terence McShane, Timothy McSweeney, Martin McWilliams, Raymond Meisenheimer, Charles Mendez, Steve Mercado, Douglas Miller, Henry Miller Jr., Robert Minara, Lt. Paul Mitchell, Thomas Mingione, Capt. Louis Modafferi, Lt. Dennis Mojica, Manuel Mojica, Carl Molinaro, Michael Montesi, Capt. Thomas Moody, Vincent Morello, B.C. John Moran, Christopher Mozzillo, Richard Muldowney Jr., Michael Mullan, Dennis Mulligan, Lt. Raymond Murphy, Lt. Bob Nagle, John Napolitano, Peter Nelson, Gerard Nevins, Dennis O 'Berg, Douglas Oblschlager, Lt. Daniel O'Callaghan, Joseph Ogren, Samuel Oitice, Patrick O’Keefe (1), Capt. William O'Keefe, Eric Olsen, Jeffery Olsen, Steven Olsen, Kevin O'Rourke, Michael J. Otten L- 35, Jeffery Palazzo, B.C. Orio J. Palmer, Frank Palombo, Paul Pansini, B.C. John Paolillo, James Pappageorge, Robert Parro, Durrell Pearsall, Lt. Glenn Perry, Lt. Philip Petti, Lt. Kevin Pfeifer, Christopher Pickford, Lt. Kenneth Phelan, Shawn Powell, Vincent Princiotta, Kevin Prior, B.C. Richard Prunty, Lincoln Quappe,Lt. Michael Quilty, Kevin Orourke, Michael Otten, Ricardo Quinn (FDNY EMS B-57), Leonard Ragaglia, Michael Ragusa, Edward Rall, Adam Rand, Donald Regan, Lt. Robert Regan, Christian Regenhard,Lt. Vernon Richard, James Riches, Joseph Rivelli Jr., Kevin Reilly, Michael Roberts (L35), Michael Roberts (E214), Anthony Rocco Jr., Anthony Rodriquez, Matthew Rogan, Nichlas Rossomando, Paul Rubach, Stephen Russell, Lt. Michael T. Russo, B.C. Matthew L. Ryan, Thomas Sabella, Christopher Santora, John Santore, Gregory Saucedo, Dennis Scauso, John Schardt, B.C. Fred Scheffold, Thomas Schoales, Gerard Schrang, Gregory Sikorsky, Stephen Siller, Stanely Smagala Jr., Kevin Smith, Leon Smith Jr., Robert Spear Jr., Joseph Spor, B.C. Lawrence Stack, Capt. Timothy Stackpole, Gregory Stajk, Jeffery Stark, Benjamin Suarez, Daniel Suhr, Lt. Christopher Sullivan, Brian Sweeney, Sean Tallon, Allen Tarasiewicz, Paul Tegtmeirer, John Tierney, John Tipping II, Hector Tirado Jr., Richard VanHine, Peter Vega, Lawrence Veling, John Vigiano II, Sergio Villanueva, Lawrence Virgilio, Lt. Robert Wallace, Jeffery Walz, Lt. Michael Warchola, Capt. Patrick Waters, Kenneth Watson, Michael Weinberg, David Weiss, Timothy Welty, Eugene Whelan, Edward White, Mark Whitford, Michael Weinberg, Lt. Glenn Wilkinson, B.C. John Williamson, Capt. David Wooley, Raymond York. Retired FDNY Firefighters who lost their lives saving others : James J. Corrigan, Phillip Hayes, William Wren. Member of the New York City Fire Patrol who lost his life saving others: Keith Roma. PLUS a 1000 more sick and dying.
    Yup, can't think of a BETTER reason. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    Originally posted by E40FDNYL35 View Post
    Touching?????? That's pretty f'n cold.

    Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is a Pakistani in U.S. custody in Guantánamo Bay for acts of terrorism, including mass murder of civilians. He was charged on February 11, 2008, with war crimes and murder by a U.S. military commission and faces the death penalty if convicted. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was a member of Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda organization, although he lived in Kuwait rather than Afghanistan, heading al-Qaeda's propaganda operations from sometime around 1999. The 9/11 Commission Report said that he was "the principal architect of the 9/11 attacks." He is also know to have confessed to a role in many of the most significant terrorist plots over the last twenty years, including the World Trade Center 1993 bombings, the Operation Bojinka plot, an aborted 2002 attack on the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles, the Bali nightclub bombings, the failed bombing of American Airlines Flight 63, the Millennium Plot, and the murder of Daniel Pearl. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was captured in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on March 1, 2003, by the Pakistani ISI, possibly in a joint action with agents of the American Diplomatic Security Service, and has been in U.S. custody since that time. On December 8, 2008, Mohammed and four co-defendants sent a note to the military judge expressing their desire to confess and plead guilty.
    Yes, they can try terrorists in the civilian court as they have done so under the Clinton administration in the case involving those who blasted the basement of the World Trade Center. The terrorists, however, came back a few years later and destroyed both towers of the WTC. So, it was a successful civilian trial, but we lost over 3000 lives later. Good luck with another civilian trial.


    Hey Brother you are very correct. This 105 doesn't have a clue on this.

    Leave a comment:


  • E40FDNYL35
    replied
    Touching?????? That's pretty f'n cold.

    Khalid Sheikh Mohammed is a Pakistani in U.S. custody in Guantánamo Bay for acts of terrorism, including mass murder of civilians. He was charged on February 11, 2008, with war crimes and murder by a U.S. military commission and faces the death penalty if convicted. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was a member of Osama bin Laden's al-Qaeda organization, although he lived in Kuwait rather than Afghanistan, heading al-Qaeda's propaganda operations from sometime around 1999. The 9/11 Commission Report said that he was "the principal architect of the 9/11 attacks." He is also know to have confessed to a role in many of the most significant terrorist plots over the last twenty years, including the World Trade Center 1993 bombings, the Operation Bojinka plot, an aborted 2002 attack on the U.S. Bank Tower in Los Angeles, the Bali nightclub bombings, the failed bombing of American Airlines Flight 63, the Millennium Plot, and the murder of Daniel Pearl. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed was captured in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on March 1, 2003, by the Pakistani ISI, possibly in a joint action with agents of the American Diplomatic Security Service, and has been in U.S. custody since that time. On December 8, 2008, Mohammed and four co-defendants sent a note to the military judge expressing their desire to confess and plead guilty.
    Yes, they can try terrorists in the civilian court as they have done so under the Clinton administration in the case involving those who blasted the basement of the World Trade Center. The terrorists, however, came back a few years later and destroyed both towers of the WTC. So, it was a successful civilian trial, but we lost over 3000 lives later. Good luck with another civilian trial.
    Last edited by E40FDNYL35; 04-06-2011, 08:26 PM.

    Leave a comment:

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