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  • Brannigans building construction book.

    I have the Third edition, which came out in 1992. Does anybody have (or has seen) both the third edition and the newer 2007 edition and can comment on how much less the 1992 version has vs the new, 2007 version? I know plenty has changed in the construction world in those 15 years, but as far as the book goes, is it worth spending $75.00 for the newer version?

    Just looking for opinions.

  • #2
    The 4th edition is here......

    http://www.constructionbook.com/bran.../public-works/
    Stay Safe and Well Out There....

    Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
      Yes, i have seen plenty of online places selling the fourth edition. My question is not where to get it, my question is are the changes worth spending the money vs just using the older version.

      Copied and pasted:

      New to this Edition:

      New chapter features include:

      •Learning Objectives - Objectives are provided for each chapter with corresponding page references.
      •Words from Brannigan - Words from Brannigan is a case study opening each chapter, from noted authority Frank Brannigan.
      •Chapter Summaries - These summaries review the key concepts presented in the chapter.
      •Key Terms - Terms are easily identified and defined within the text. A comprehensive list with definitions follows each chapter.
      •Review Questions - Review questions are available to test readers retention of the materials presented in the chapter.
      New 3-section chapter reorganization:

      •Principles of Building Construction
      •Types of Building Construction
      •Special Hazards

      =-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=-=

      Based on that, other then some "words from Brannigan" nothing is jumping out as being critical new info. It seems as though most of the changes are organizational changes. Like how the chapters are grouped and adding summaries.

      Comment


      • #4
        My opinion- keep and use the old. The 4th edition looks like someone took a chainsaw to it. It's all of an inch thick (counting the hardcover) and has only a fraction of the material. I don't know why they bothered to put Brannigan's name on it.

        While it may be of some use, it's certainly not up to what Brannigan put out.

        Comment


        • #5
          I have both. Only read 3rd edition.

          4th edition is the "corporate" version.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the info, just what i wanted to hear.

            I just saved a ton of cash too. Ill buy another book!.

            Comment


            • #7
              Here are a few great reading suggestions (not all building construction related):

              Fireground Strategies by Emmanuel Fried
              Firefighting Principles and Practices by William Clark
              Incident Management for the Street Smart Fire Officer by Skip Coleman
              Collapse of Burning Buildings by Vinny Dunn
              Random Thoughts by Tom Brennan
              Fireground Strategies by Anthony Avillo
              Fire Officer's Handbook of Tactics by John Norman
              Euro Firefighter by Paul Grimwood
              Warrior Mindset by Michael Asken
              The Combat Position by Chris Brennan

              All on Amazon...cheap...

              (forgive me if you already have any of these)

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Catch22 View Post
                My opinion- keep and use the old. The 4th edition looks like someone took a chainsaw to it. It's all of an inch thick (counting the hardcover) and has only a fraction of the material. I don't know why they bothered to put Brannigan's name on it.

                While it may be of some use, it's certainly not up to what Brannigan put out.
                Wow ....

                Glenn Corbett, an Assistant Professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, was working with Frank Brannigan and the publishers to update his book.

                Professor Corbett has a master's degree in Fire Protection Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1991) and is a technical editor with Fire Engineering magazine. Here is his resume (CLICK HERE)

                I have all four editions of the book.

                The first edition (1971) was built from the collection of the lectures and notes he used when developing the first Building Construction for the Fire Service course taught by Brannigan at Montgomery College in Rockville, Maryland. Topics and examples were focused on New York City and the Baltimore-Washington area.

                Printed in the small book format by NFPA (5" by 8" pages)

                The second edition (1982) reflected his international travels and additional information he acquired while working as a consultant for the federal government. This was the edition he emphasized the hazards of lightweight wood truss roof components and promoted the concept of evacuating a building if the sprinkler system was out-of-service.

                Brannigan was 64 when the second edition was published. In terms of content it was the most up-to-date. It is also the version I memorized when preparing for fire officer promotional exams.

                I started teaching building construction at the community college in 1984. The book was information rich. Not well-constructed as a textbook or a promotional reference - some times I could find two different answers for the same question or factoid.

                I attended two (or three) presentations by Professor Brannigan. He was still speaking at supersonic speed and provided the background to many of his passions about building construction.

                The third edition (1992) was better constructed as a textbook/promotional reference book. New content focused on the areas he continued to care about - lightweight truss construction (now including floors), exposed roofs, engineered wood, flame spread and the problems of non-working built in fire sprinklers/standpipes.

                But there was no coverage of new building material/construction practices.

                From my perspective, running a fire science program, many of the textbooks in the early 1990s suffered from arrested development - the latest science and craft of fire suppression/protection was not found in the textbooks.

                Professor Corbett was brought in to provide up-to-date information on building construction materials, construction features and tactical issues.

                The update reorganized the book to be more effective as a learning tool for colleges, fire academies and test preparation.

                The core Brannigan lessons remained, but reflecting changes in the 15 years since the third edition went to press.

                It also eliminated the redundancies found in the third and second edition ... which is where we used to struggle with two "correct" answers to the same question.

                When Brannigan died in 2006 he was 88 years old.

                The fourth edition came out in 2008. It is uses larger pages than the third edition: 10" x 7" versus 9" x 6"

                Which is one reason why the fourth edition is 348 pages and the third edition is 667

                There are significant differences between the 1992 (3rd) and 2008 (4th) editions.

                But, if you plan to buy another book, get the SECOND edition of Chief Dunn's Collapse of Building Buildings. It came out October 2010

                http://www.pennwellbooks.com/coofbubuguto.html

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MikeWard View Post
                  Wow ....

                  Glenn Corbett, an Assistant Professor at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, was working with Frank Brannigan and the publishers to update his book.

                  Professor Corbett has a master's degree in Fire Protection Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (1991) and is a technical editor with Fire Engineering magazine. Here is his resume (CLICK HERE)

                  I have all four editions of the book.

                  The first edition (1971) was built from the collection of the lectures and notes he used when developing the first Building Construction for the Fire Service course taught by Brannigan at Montgomery College in Rockville, Maryland. Topics and examples were focused on New York City and the Baltimore-Washington area.

                  Printed in the small book format by NFPA (5" by 8" pages)

                  The second edition (1982) reflected his international travels and additional information he acquired while working as a consultant for the federal government. This was the edition he emphasized the hazards of lightweight wood truss roof components and promoted the concept of evacuating a building if the sprinkler system was out-of-service.

                  Brannigan was 64 when the second edition was published. In terms of content it was the most up-to-date. It is also the version I memorized when preparing for fire officer promotional exams.

                  I started teaching building construction at the community college in 1984. The book was information rich. Not well-constructed as a textbook or a promotional reference - some times I could find two different answers for the same question or factoid.

                  I attended two (or three) presentations by Professor Brannigan. He was still speaking at supersonic speed and provided the background to many of his passions about building construction.

                  The third edition (1992) was better constructed as a textbook/promotional reference book. New content focused on the areas he continued to care about - lightweight truss construction (now including floors), exposed roofs, engineered wood, flame spread and the problems of non-working built in fire sprinklers/standpipes.

                  But there was no coverage of new building material/construction practices.

                  From my perspective, running a fire science program, many of the textbooks in the early 1990s suffered from arrested development - the latest science and craft of fire suppression/protection was not found in the textbooks.

                  Professor Corbett was brought in to provide up-to-date information on building construction materials, construction features and tactical issues.

                  The update reorganized the book to be more effective as a learning tool for colleges, fire academies and test preparation.

                  The core Brannigan lessons remained, but reflecting changes in the 15 years since the third edition went to press.

                  It also eliminated the redundancies found in the third and second edition ... which is where we used to struggle with two "correct" answers to the same question.

                  When Brannigan died in 2006 he was 88 years old.

                  The fourth edition came out in 2008. It is uses larger pages than the third edition: 10" x 7" versus 9" x 6"

                  Which is one reason why the fourth edition is 348 pages and the third edition is 667

                  There are significant differences between the 1992 (3rd) and 2008 (4th) editions.

                  But, if you plan to buy another book, get the SECOND edition of Chief Dunn's Collapse of Building Buildings. It came out October 2010

                  http://www.pennwellbooks.com/coofbubuguto.html
                  Thank you for the very thorough response. Lots of great info on the book series. ebay has been a great place to find them. The Third edition can be had for less then $20.00 and the second for even less then that. Which means their is no real reason most people who are interested in learning more about the topic cannot afford to do so.

                  Ill have to look into that new-er Dunn book. I have seen it on Amazon.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by powerhourcoug View Post
                    Here are a few great reading suggestions (not all building construction related):

                    Fireground Strategies by Emmanuel Fried
                    Firefighting Principles and Practices by William Clark
                    Incident Management for the Street Smart Fire Officer by Skip Coleman
                    Collapse of Burning Buildings by Vinny Dunn
                    Random Thoughts by Tom Brennan
                    Fireground Strategies by Anthony Avillo
                    Fire Officer's Handbook of Tactics by John Norman
                    Euro Firefighter by Paul Grimwood
                    Warrior Mindset by Michael Asken
                    The Combat Position by Chris Brennan

                    All on Amazon...cheap...

                    (forgive me if you already have any of these)
                    Thanks for that list. I do have some of them. I did recently pick up Dunn's Strategy of Firefighting. But ill have to check out the others. I love to read and love to read about my craft even more. Their is countless stuff you read about that you are likley to never encounter, but nothing wrong with knowing about it. Failing to Prepare is Prepairing to Fail.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      On the subject of great books, just noticed Chief Salka's excellent book, The Engine Company is on sale right now direct from the pubisher at $29.99. That is more then half off the regular price of $69.99. Amazon is not even close to that cheap.

                      If anybody wants a great book with lots of info on Engine Company operations, pick it up.

                      Comment

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