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Which departments use a quiet response policy to certain types of calls?

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  • #46
    My Dept. just changed their response priority.
    as a Fire/EMS dept., both the rescue (ambulance) and either a pumper,quint, or ladder would both be dispatched to any medical emergency code 3. now, with this new dispatch system, we have different response types

    Alpha-pumper,ladder, quint code 1
    Bravo- pumper, ladder, or quint code 3
    Charlie-Rescue code 3
    Delta- Fire apparatus and rescue code 3

    now, all response types are determined on what the caller tells the dispatcher, with this new system, it prioritizes what type of responise will be needed. this was basically done to reduce the number of calls the rescues were running.

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    • #47
      Iselin fire, nj we do a non emergency response to water alarm, co, mutual aid standby's (to cover there house) and only on co calls that a home owner calls it in if the alarm company calls it in or pd we respond lights a sirens

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      • #48
        The Secret List had this yesterday;

        FDNY EXPANDS THEIR "NO LIGHTS/NO SIRENS" RESPONSE POLICY:

        Thirty percent of FDNY's runs are for non-fire, non-life threatening incidents. The number of non-fire and non-life-threatening calls received by them has nearly doubled over the past 20 years. They now account for nearly 300,000 of 1 million annual runs made by FDNY apparatus.
        Fire Commissioner Salvatore Cassano has ordered units to begin to slow down. Under the Fire Department's new "modified response" policy, trucks will now respond to some calls here at a reduced speed - obeying all traffic regulations - without the use of sirens and lights. Expansion of the program into Staten Island and Brooklyn follows a six-month trial in Queens, where accidents involving FDNY units were cut by 32 percent.
        The changes being put into effect by the FDNY safety program will not affect full-scale responses to fires and other life-threatening emergencies. Under "modified response," only the first-due units will respond emergency, allowing fire officers to determine what further response is needed.
        HERE IS MORE FOR YOU TO READ, 1 Media and 1 From FDNY:

        http://www.nyc.gov/html/fdny/html/pr...511_1811.shtml

        http://www.silive.com/opinion/editor...tional_re.html
        ~Drew
        Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
        USAR TF Rescue Specialist

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        • #49
          Not for nothing, but if you're obeying all traffic laws how "visible" do you really need to be? Do you use them during driver training, district inspections, or going to the school for fire prevention week? The career guys going out to buy dinner might as well use them enroute to the grocery store if visibility is the argument. But they don't, because it's dumb.

          The tow truck uses warning lights because it's got another vehicle hanging off the back of it. Even then, I saw one the other day that had more front-facing lights than our heavy rescue. You'd think they'd want most of their visibility to the rear, especially due to the hazards associated with being on the side of the road during a pickup.

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