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LDH Hose / cotton vs rubber

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  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    With Clams from the Cape and Potatos from Aroostook County....... Yep!, I'm in for a BIG Bowl.........
    Too bad,just missed it. Had a NEW TOOL(hyd)training yesterday. Lunch was Oyster stew,New England fish chowda or Homemade beef stew. The clam chowda was LAST week. T.C.

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  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by islandfire03 View Post
    Natures pump lubricant !

    I see you've been to some of our dry hydrants!
    Sure as Hell ain't limited to the Island,Hehe T.C.

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    My "Bonehead" was meant to be a lighthearted jab among Friends, if it was misread, I sincerely apoligize......
    Chief,

    You and I are cool, and my comment that I thought better of had noting to do with your comment. Hell, if I got ****ed off at everybody that called me a bonehead, or worse, I would have about 13 minutes a day to not be ****ed off.

    This was the comment that I responded to:

    Its great that they do what works for them and aren't influenced by what anyone else is doing.
    While that can be a good thing it can also lead to tragedy by fire departments that refuse to "modernize" both tactics and equipment. AND, if I had said it that way, instead of the way I did, I would have left it on here.

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  • hwoods
    replied
    Absolutely........

    Originally posted by DeputyChiefGonzo View Post
    New England Clam Chowdah.....

    With Clams from the Cape and Potatos from Aroostook County....... Yep!, I'm in for a BIG Bowl.........

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Ummm...........

    Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
    Thought better of what I said and felt it was inappropriate.

    So I deleted it.


    My "Bonehead" was meant to be a lighthearted jab among Friends, if it was misread, I sincerely apoligize......

    Leave a comment:


  • islandfire03
    replied
    Natures pump lubricant !

    I see you've been to some of our dry hydrants!

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    So, What kind of Soup are you pumping thru that LDH??......
    I FIXED IT.
    Oh,the usuals. Cream of goose,poop of moose,cah cah of fish. If it FITS,it SHIPS,hehe T.C.
    Last edited by Rescue101; 02-27-2011, 04:06 PM.

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  • Eng3ineer
    replied
    Originally posted by FMNPFD View Post
    Thank you so much for all your input here. We were leaning towards rubber LDH, for reasons pointed out here, having used it for years and are already skilled in it's use. There was discussion among our administration over the weight of 100' rolls, with the DJ being a little lighter and many questions arised as to the difference in the DJ vs. rubber nitrile. We run 5-3 man engines and 2 man truck with a total of 18 FFs on a shift with 8 FFs called in for all double alarms, so manpower has never been an issue. Additionally, we are purchasing a RollnRack powered hose roller to assist in rolling, transporting and loading hose when we can't load on scene. GPMs throughout the city, 95% hydrants, has never been an issue, plenty of water to go around. I really appreciate all your advice here, we really look forward to this much needed upgrade in our department.
    We switched over most of our engines/quints to 5" little over nine years ago, still have one front line that carries dual 1000' 3" beds.

    I'd go rubber as was mentioned before you can pack it wet and easier to clean just scrub it with brush and soap.

    On the weight of 100' footers take pry bar and slide it middle and carry with two FF.

    Also when loading leave front of bed open around 14" and load all coupling in that space making sure to not have them flip when laying out.

    Also don't get just 100' footers for bed get 50' footer as well.

    On the last/top 400' of line we split the section up 50'-50'-100'-50'-100'-50' helps a bunch when make a short lay. We also carry 30' hydrant section (water dept. tends put few hydrants miles off the road) and a spare 50' in compartment.

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    Thought better of what I said and felt it was inappropriate.

    So I deleted it.
    Last edited by FyredUp; 02-27-2011, 12:32 AM.

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  • DeputyChiefGonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    So, What kind of Soup are you pumping thru that LDH??......
    New England Clam Chowdah.....

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  • hwoods
    replied
    Hmmm................

    Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
    ALL of OUR Ldh is 100's minus a half dozen 150's on the Reel truck, the 150's cut down on the soupling "humps" on the Reel. ALL the Engines have a 25 and a 50' short section in a compartment as well.Whenever possible,LONG lays are done with the Reel. We have,on numerous occasions, laid over a mile of 5" with Relay valves cut in as necessary. Pick up takes three personnel once the line is drained. We have both DJ Ldh and the "Rubber" style, don't have any coupling problems with either. T.C.

    So, What kind of Soup are you pumping thru that LDH??......

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    ALL of OUR Ldh is 100's minus a half dozen 150's on the Reel truck, the 150's cut down on the coupling "humps" on the Reel. ALL the Engines have a 25 and a 50' short section in a compartment as well.Whenever possible,LONG lays are done with the Reel. We have,on numerous occasions, laid over a mile of 5" with Relay valves cut in as necessary. Pick up takes three personnel once the line is drained. We have both DJ Ldh and the "Rubber" style, don't have any coupling problems with either. T.C.
    Last edited by Rescue101; 02-27-2011, 08:28 AM.

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  • firepundit
    replied
    Actually, I think most of you are actually using polyester or nylon as opposed to cotton when referring to double jacket hose. I haven't sold a piece of real cotton hose since the early 1970's.

    Other than that, an interesting discussion. I have been trying to think of a single department I have seen that had a hosebed full of double jacket LDH but cannot. In the past I used to sell a lot of 15' or 20' sections for hitting a hydrant to city departments. Had to wrestle a 7' high pallet of 50' sections once and don't think I would want to wrestle 100' sections that are damp. Can't imagine using it for long distance lays.

    Also, not sure how DJ would work with Storz couplings what with the clamps and the outer fabric. If you had to go to expansion ring type couplings it sure would be a pain in the politician to repack. Further, due to the thickness, it would take up a ton more space. I am not at work so I can't calculate the difference in cubic feet but I am sure it would be considerable.

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  • backsteprescue
    replied
    Originally posted by pipeman1822 View Post
    I disagree to some extent. You and Hwoods are talking about different sizes. If I used cotton 5" then it would probably be tough. He's talking about 3" and you 5". Big difference.

    I've used rubber 5" back when I worked in the suburbs and now use cotton 3" in a large city department. The 3" is MUCH easier in my opinion. It's very quick to rerack. Yes, it can suck when wet sometimes, but it's not a big deal. As far as cleaning it, we don't do it that often. We lay out several times each tour. When finished we rerack and go in service. Whereas in a suburban department, we would go back to the fire house, clean the hose, and usually put new stuff on.

    It comes down to what works for your department. 3" is much better here because its a large city. Where I worked before, 5" worked. We have more fires in the city but they aren't as big due to our staffing. The suburban department needed more water because it was usually a bigger fire upon arrival. For when we do have large fires, we have six "water supply engines" These engines have 5" rubber LDH. We have them scattered across the city manned by one person if needed.
    I was in DC for the weekend class the Burn Foundation put on at the academy and was pretty surprised at what I learned about how DCFD operates. Its great that they do what works for them and aren't influenced by what anyone else is doing.

    Alot of us suburban firefighters were pretty shocked when one of the DC guys with quite a few years on the job said that he could probably count on one hand the times he stretched 2.5 for the average job. With as many guys as they have coming, they just pull the 1.5".

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by pipeman1822 View Post
    I disagree to some extent. You and Hwoods are talking about different sizes. If I used cotton 5" then it would probably be tough. He's talking about 3" and you 5". Big difference.

    I've used rubber 5" back when I worked in the suburbs and now use cotton 3" in a large city department. The 3" is MUCH easier in my opinion. It's very quick to rerack. Yes, it can suck when wet sometimes, but it's not a big deal. As far as cleaning it, we don't do it that often. We lay out several times each tour. When finished we rerack and go in service. Whereas in a suburban department, we would go back to the fire house, clean the hose, and usually put new stuff on.

    It comes down to what works for your department. 3" is much better here because its a large city. Where I worked before, 5" worked. We have more fires in the city but they aren't as big due to our staffing. The suburban department needed more water because it was usually a bigger fire upon arrival. For when we do have large fires, we have six "water supply engines" These engines have 5" rubber LDH. We have them scattered across the city manned by one person if needed.
    I never tried to convice Hwoods to change the way they operate. I am a believer in LDH, the simple fact that I can get all the water the hydrant can give me in most cases is what convinces me.

    Both FDs I am affiliated with use 5 inch hose, one is a very rural volunteer FD and one is a suburb of Milwaukee with a wide variety of hazards from single family dwellings, to multi-family apartments, to industrial, to commercial, to a mall, to a large medical complex. I just believe that if we prepare for the worst, including water supply,l we are never caught unprepared.

    Leave a comment:

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