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  • #31
    Three quick thoughts.

    1) Remain unattached. View patients as an object that you have to correct a deficiency (airway, breathing, circulation). Continue to treat them with care and respect, but as an object. You start thinking about the patient's wife/kids/mother and you will become combat ineffective.

    2) Give the patient the best interventions within your scope of care. Remember that if you were not there, then someone else would be giving care and who knows how well they would be doing? Since you are there you know they are getting the best care possible.

    3) This line of work is not for everybody.
    ~Drew
    Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
    USAR TF Rescue Specialist

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    • #32
      Originally posted by nameless View Post
      boy do I try, but she says its disgusting.
      Don't we all...
      sigpic

      In this world there's two kinds of people, my friend: Those with loaded guns and those who dig.

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      • #33
        Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
        Never had to do that HERE but if it were to happen, it WILL be OUR members doing the Extrication. The member is OURS and WE WILL take care of them. Chaplain on Staff and CISD team available on a moments notice. T.c.
        That was the mindset here until it actually happened....

        About 5 years ago in January we had crews out on the interstate for an relatively minor MVA. Two guys were in the car, one standing next to it, and the fourth up on the pump panel. Roads were real bad and icy and a van drove straight past the blocking apparatus, and into the car flipping it over onto the one guy and running one police officer over and pinning another between the cars. The only man left standing was the pump operator. He called it in and asked for mutual aid immediately. Our Rescue Squad was about 3-4 minutes away and even once they got on scene they could hardly operate. A full crew of aggressive balls to the wall firemen and they could barely do anything except care for their buddies. Next department got there and got the car off the one guy, got everyone out etc. Our 3 injured guys were all taken to trauma centers and eventually came back to work.... granted it was a long time, but they made it back to full duty. Both cops were also made traumas and ended up having to retire on disability from the accident.

        That makes 3 cops for a police department of about 25-30 guys in the past 5 years that have been struck by vehicles and had to medically retire.

        We get our fair share of bad wrecks and bad calls and having people to talk to is a huge help.

        About 2 months after my best friend's son was born we were working together and went out at 630 one Saturday morning for an unconscious pediatric. The 2 month old child had passed away during the night and we worked him all the way to the hospital. My buddy was very professional but once we got to the hospital and transferred care, he broke down. This is one of the toughest guys I know, 2 tours in Iraq, just an all around great guy and he was a mess. He ended up going home shortly after returning to quarters and a few hours later asked if I could stop by and we talked all day.

        The first call that I really noticed affected me was a few years back when a 12 year old girl got struck by a car on a busy road (speed limit 55). The girl was thrown about 75 feet down the road. One of our guys lived a few doors down and started CPR immediately, we got on scene, did our ALS stuff, and ended up flying her to a trauma center. Like some of the others mentioned, it seems like you just hit the snooze button on emotions or whatever, and I was fine until about 2 hours later when I was driving out of town to visit a friend. I had to pull over and call our department chaplain because it all of a sudden hit me that this girl was not much younger than my sister.

        It's rough, but just remember that there are always people to talk to. And if you aren't feeling well after a call, chances are that the rest of the crew isn't either.
        ------------------------------------
        These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
        ------------------------------------

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by RFRDxplorer View Post
          That was the mindset here until it actually happened....

          About 5 years ago in January we had crews out on the interstate for an relatively minor MVA. Two guys were in the car, one standing next to it, and the fourth up on the pump panel. Roads were real bad and icy and a van drove straight past the blocking apparatus, and into the car flipping it over onto the one guy and running one police officer over and pinning another between the cars. The only man left standing was the pump operator. He called it in and asked for mutual aid immediately. Our Rescue Squad was about 3-4 minutes away and even once they got on scene they could hardly operate. A full crew of aggressive balls to the wall firemen and they could barely do anything except care for their buddies. Next department got there and got the car off the one guy, got everyone out etc. Our 3 injured guys were all taken to trauma centers and eventually came back to work.... granted it was a long time, but they made it back to full duty. Both cops were also made traumas and ended up having to retire on disability from the accident.

          That makes 3 cops for a police department of about 25-30 guys in the past 5 years that have been struck by vehicles and had to medically retire.

          We get our fair share of bad wrecks and bad calls and having people to talk to is a huge help.

          About 2 months after my best friend's son was born we were working together and went out at 630 one Saturday morning for an unconscious pediatric. The 2 month old child had passed away during the night and we worked him all the way to the hospital. My buddy was very professional but once we got to the hospital and transferred care, he broke down. This is one of the toughest guys I know, 2 tours in Iraq, just an all around great guy and he was a mess. He ended up going home shortly after returning to quarters and a few hours later asked if I could stop by and we talked all day.

          The first call that I really noticed affected me was a few years back when a 12 year old girl got struck by a car on a busy road (speed limit 55). The girl was thrown about 75 feet down the road. One of our guys lived a few doors down and started CPR immediately, we got on scene, did our ALS stuff, and ended up flying her to a trauma center. Like some of the others mentioned, it seems like you just hit the snooze button on emotions or whatever, and I was fine until about 2 hours later when I was driving out of town to visit a friend. I had to pull over and call our department chaplain because it all of a sudden hit me that this girl was not much younger than my sister.

          It's rough, but just remember that there are always people to talk to. And if you aren't feeling well after a call, chances are that the rest of the crew isn't either.
          Take this in the proper light. In view of what you just told me,I'd say you didn't IRON your scene enough. ANY call that takes a Life affects me deeply but NOT to the point I can't do MY job. I've cut buddies out of vehicles and to be honest,never realized it until later.The who is wasn't my FOCUS,getting them OUT was. I stand by what I said,IF it involves OUR members,WE WILL be working the job. We're fortunate to have some of the best people in the area and THEY are the ones I want working on the problem. T.C.

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
            ANY call that takes a Life affects me deeply but NOT to the point I can't do MY job.
            Everybody has their call. Hopefully they'll be able to keep it together until after the call is over, but everyone is different. Never say never.
            Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

            Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

            Comment


            • #36
              Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
              Take this in the proper light. In view of what you just told me,I'd say you didn't IRON your scene enough. ANY call that takes a Life affects me deeply but NOT to the point I can't do MY job. I've cut buddies out of vehicles and to be honest,never realized it until later.The who is wasn't my FOCUS,getting them OUT was. I stand by what I said,IF it involves OUR members,WE WILL be working the job. We're fortunate to have some of the best people in the area and THEY are the ones I want working on the problem. T.C.
              No worries, I completely understand where you're coming from. Needless to say since the accident we have like you said "put more iron" on the scene.

              I'd like to think that I would be able to still function, but I wasn't on this scene and haven't been faced with anything close to this short of transporting a good friends mom and having her arrest in the back of the medic unit.
              ------------------------------------
              These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
              ------------------------------------

              Comment


              • #37
                I am not sure if I understand the question.

                The first time you ever encountered a trauma (or any other) scene will be very different from how you arrive (i.e. mentally prepare) for any given situation 20 years later.

                By that point, you should have gained enough "street experience" and training to handle yourself accordingly.

                But then again, the following phrase comes to mind: "You can have 20 years of experience OR one year of experience 20 times".

                It all boils down to your personal drive/motivation (i.e. give a sh*t factor).
                DFW



                "There's no such thing as a free lunch."

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