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  • Using webbing as your means of egress

    Hey guys, I searched and couldn't find this topic addressed specifically.

    Has anyone ever heard, seen, or done a bailout using webbing rather than rope? I've heard of guys wrapping one end of a looped piece around a tool, burying it in the wall, doing a triple wrap around a biner and bailing. I've also head of guys starting that same way but just holding on for dear life with their hands.

    Any suggestions? I've heard of this, but never seen it happen.
    FDNY 343 - 9.11.01
    "Move out and draw fire"

  • #2
    50' of bailout rope is like $40. Id rather attempt a body slide with a rope than "hope for the best" with webbing.
    Career Firefighter
    Volunteer Captain

    -Professional in Either Role-

    Originally posted by Rescue101
    I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

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    • #3
      We played with it before all of the newer kevlar ropes came out. 50 feet of 1 inch tubular webbing was just as strong as the 7-8 mm rope we were using and it packed in a much smaller bag (it had to be stored in a stuff bag to avoid getting tangled up when deployed.) It worked just as well as rope using the body wrap and grab in front procedure that was popular before all the current descender stuff was developed. We never tried using a carabiner wrap with it as there was the opinion if you had to get out now, you didn't have time to wrap a biner and the potential for wrapping it wrong might result in a failure.

      At the time, the other advantage was that it was readily available since we used the webbing for other stuff and had rolls of it on hand.

      Biggest disadvantage obviously is that it cuts easily under a load since what you see is what is holding you up. Now with the NPFA approval issue, it would also be a big liability to use it with the approved ropes being relatively affordable.
      Last edited by FEMADog; 02-23-2011, 01:28 PM.

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      • #4
        I have 50ft of webbing one one pocket, and another bunch in my other. The second bunch is in a water knot and ends up being about 6'. I can make a quick rescue seat out of it and a carabiner. Between the two I should be able to get out of a bad spot, or at least lessen the distance of the drop. Running the 50' section through the biner allows you to use some friction to slow yourself down. Easier than rope imo.
        Fire Service Interview questions - The blog that has REAL interview questions for firefighters, Engineers, Lieutenants, and Captains !

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        • #5
          Originally posted by JT_Fire_2000 View Post
          I have 50ft of webbing one one pocket, and another bunch in my other. The second bunch is in a water knot and ends up being about 6'. I can make a quick rescue seat out of it and a carabiner. Between the two I should be able to get out of a bad spot, or at least lessen the distance of the drop. Running the 50' section through the biner allows you to use some friction to slow yourself down. Easier than rope imo.
          Well spoken...rather have the rope myself as well
          "First In, Last Out"

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          • #6
            Originally posted by JT_Fire_2000 View Post
            I have 50ft of webbing one one pocket, and another bunch in my other. The second bunch is in a water knot and ends up being about 6'. I can make a quick rescue seat out of it and a carabiner. Between the two I should be able to get out of a bad spot, or at least lessen the distance of the drop. Running the 50' section through the biner allows you to use some friction to slow yourself down. Easier than rope imo.
            You will likely not have time to make a rescue seat in a bail out situation.

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            • #7
              While I have never actually had to use it, I have 50ft of tubular webbing, and on one end of it I keep a biner with a clove hitch and a double safety on it. The plan would be to clip the biner on the tool, put it in the lower corner of the window and lower myself out.
              Fire scenes: A well organized cluster F......
              These are my veiws and opinions.....Im just saying

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              • #8
                Originally posted by JT_Fire_2000 View Post
                I have 50ft of webbing one one pocket, and another bunch in my other. The second bunch is in a water knot and ends up being about 6'. I can make a quick rescue seat out of it and a carabiner. Between the two I should be able to get out of a bad spot, or at least lessen the distance of the drop. Running the 50' section through the biner allows you to use some friction to slow yourself down. Easier than rope imo.
                I am not following the method you descibe. All you are doing is just feeding the webbing through the carabiner? Doesn't sound like much friction to me. Have you trained with this method?

                Originally posted by blaster668 View Post
                You will likely not have time to make a rescue seat in a bail out situation.
                Agreed.

                Originally posted by Chewy911 View Post
                While I have never actually had to use it, I have 50ft of tubular webbing, and on one end of it I keep a biner with a clove hitch and a double safety on it. The plan would be to clip the biner on the tool, put it in the lower corner of the window and lower myself out.
                Not sure I follow this either. What are you doing for friction? Body slide technique?

                Whatever you guys have in mind for this, make sure you train with it. And whatever you can come up with is better than nothing.
                Career Firefighter
                Volunteer Captain

                -Professional in Either Role-

                Originally posted by Rescue101
                I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by blaster668 View Post
                  You will likely not have time to make a rescue seat in a bail out situation.
                  Its already in a water knot. All you have to do is hold it in both hands around the top of your butt, reach between your legs and grab 1 strand, hook the biner to the 3 you now hold. Takes 3 seconds to make a rescue seat.
                  Fire Service Interview questions - The blog that has REAL interview questions for firefighters, Engineers, Lieutenants, and Captains !

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
                    Not sure I follow this either. What are you doing for friction? Body slide technique?

                    Wrapping the webbing around the tank and useing that as the "decender" or brake. Thats the quickest way i could think of if i had to get out fast. And pretty much using the same concept of something is better than nothing. lol
                    Fire scenes: A well organized cluster F......
                    These are my veiws and opinions.....Im just saying

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                    • #11
                      I find that the 1/2 inch webbing binds up more than rope does (with either a Munter hitch on a carabiner or using a small decender (like the one CMC sells). I have some 8mm rope, fits in a bag a little bigger than a softball, has worked well for the times I've tried it. Though, I've never "used" it yet.

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                      • #12
                        I have around 1/2 dozen evolutions with my Sterling F4. I am comfortable enough to use it but practice makes perfect.
                        Career Firefighter
                        Volunteer Captain

                        -Professional in Either Role-

                        Originally posted by Rescue101
                        I don't mind fire rolling over my head. I just don't like it rolling UNDER my a**.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have never personally heard of anybody using webbing as a means to egress. However if it comes down to it and you need to get out fast it does not matter what your using as long as your getting out of that fire. I would suggest that whichever you choose that you train train train with it. Know it in and out and do not take chances when it comes to your life or the life of a brother. And if all else fails and you not 5 storys high. Jump out. My father used to say " Broken bones heal better than burns, bullet holes, and broken hearts"
                          Do not let the ghosts of our fallen brothers gaze upon you and ask " What have you done to my profession?" FTB DTRT EGH

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                          • #14
                            Our bailout packs are tubular webbing. Works great. Whole package is attached to my gemtor harness and sits in my pants leg pocket ready to go.
                            "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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                            • #15
                              I've never tried a webbing bailout but as others pointed out, would assume a tactic similar to a body belay would work.

                              Luckily we are issued bailout kits with 50 ft of rope, biners, descender, etc and my new gear has a built in harness so I anchor, clip in and jump for life.

                              I took a class at DC's academy this past fall where they went over the rope slide with a body belay.... pretty cool concept if you have no other choices
                              ------------------------------------
                              These opinions are mine and do not reflect the opinions of any organizations I am affiliated with.
                              ------------------------------------

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