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  • WBFD25
    replied
    Grab the K-12 and put in the diamond blade. Cut a thin kerf in the floor over to the chief's office and your problem will solve itself.

    Chamois and a squeege are about your only option without cutting the floor to put in a catch basin.

    Or just slip on the accumulated water and file an OJI claim for your back. Watch how quickly they put in the catch basin and seperators after seeing how cheap they are compared to that.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    Put in a sump and install a pump. Pipe it outside (if there's a decent place to do it) or into the sewer system. What EPA doesn't know won't hurt 'em. Far better than having to rip out walls because of mold.

    Our station didn't have drains installed when it was built in 1957, so we've been living your problem for decades. The floor is pretty much level, so there's little pooling, but we do end up with some standing water. As mentioned, it's hard to squeegie around the apparatus, and pushing that water onto the ramp when it's +10F outside isn't exactly a great idea.

    In the warmer months the overhead doors get left up an inch or so for air circulation.

    In the winter, when the trucks may come back with a coating of snow and slush things get a lot damper, at least until it all dries up.

    Leave a comment:


  • slackjawedyokel
    replied
    Shop vac and crank the heat up in the winter / the fans in the Summer ---- and get a new chief.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eng3ineer
    replied
    Originally posted by WD6956 View Post
    The floor drains being ommited after a station overhaul was likley not an oversight. They have become an issue with EPA regs since they are plumbed into the sewer system typically, or worse, the storm drains. Putting floor drains in a facility where you have vehicles dripping oil is now an enviornmental issue. Anytime you have water flwoing, it's likley carrying oil and and possibly Antifreeze into the drains. Unless the department wanted to install seperators, it's easier (and cheaper) to just remove the drains. We have a railroad yard close by that was told they had to install an Oil/Water seperation system that was going to cost over a million dollars since the drainage system was piped to a river. So they opted for plan B. They filled the storm drain catch basins with cement.

    Your easiest solution without any permament modifications is to use a urethane Spill Dike system. They work quite well. Just lay them on the floor in the shape you want to keep water contained to one area. In your case, under the rigs. No tools, no adhesives. Just lay them down. Prices cary, but typically a few hundred dollars. They can be washed off if they get dirty and just lifted off the floor if and when you are going to wash and squeegie the bays.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.absorbentsonline.com/spil..._berm_dike.htm

    The ones i listed are 10' long. That should be more then adequate to keep the water contained under the rigs out of harms way. A Wet/Dry vac can be had for less then $200.00 (and has plenty of other practical uses at the station) and could be used to get any water pooling behind the dike instead of squeegie-ing it to the front of the bay and out the door.
    As was said large squeegee and just say on top of it.


    Your right on with EPA.

    Our last newest station was built almost 6 years ago and we have floor drains. The floor drains are around 4' deep by 2.5' x 2.5' wide have 4" pipe that comes to about 3" below floor then ties into a series of three under ground tanks out in front yard before dumping into the sewer system.

    We're not suppose to even wash our trucks out front apron as the run off goes into storm drains. But old habits are hard to break after years and years.

    Few months back heard our sister city can't even wash their trucks at station anymore have to go to the city barn wash bay.

    Leave a comment:


  • tajm611
    replied
    We can't afford snow. The only weather package we could buy was oppressant heat and 100% humidity with the bonus "infinite mosquito" gift.

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    Originally posted by tajm611 View Post
    Large squeegee on a broom handle.
    Push water outside


    /thread.
    works great unless you live in a place where it gets below 32F

    Leave a comment:


  • Jrvrescue
    replied
    Thanks for the input guys. I agree completely about the "genius" that chose to remove the drains, unfortunately, those decisions were made by someone who outranks me. The worst part is that the floor still slopes slightly towards where the drain used to be, so alot of the water actually pools up along the new bedroom wall (the reason for the remodel, and what covered up the floor drain), which will eventually become a mold issue too.

    The reason there is so much water in the station is because it rains here all the time, so the rigs are pretty much always wet when we back them in. Even if we dry them down with chamois I have been trying to keep up with the squeegy and mop, but it's hard when I'm only there 8 days a month. There are other issues related to this as well, most notably, that many people don't pull their own weight, but that's a whole different issue.

    The Chiefs decided to remove the drain, and I think we all know the last thing we'll ever see them do is mop the bay floor. I wish I could say that our station takes pride in itself and it's appearance, but with the exception of a few people, that'd be a lie.

    I passed this along to our safety committee this month, so we will see if it gets addressed. I just don't want to see anyone fall and get hurt.

    Thanks again for the help guys.

    Leave a comment:


  • mcwops
    replied
    Originally posted by WD6956 View Post
    The floor drains being ommited after a station overhaul was likley not an oversight. They have become an issue with EPA regs since they are plumbed into the sewer system typically, or worse, the storm drains. Putting floor drains in a facility where you have vehicles dripping oil is now an enviornmental issue. Anytime you have water flwoing, it's likley carrying oil and and possibly Antifreeze into the drains. Unless the department wanted to install seperators, it's easier (and cheaper) to just remove the drains. We have a railroad yard close by that was told they had to install an Oil/Water seperation system that was going to cost over a million dollars since the drainage system was piped to a river. So they opted for plan B. They filled the storm drain catch basins with cement.

    Your easiest solution without any permament modifications is to use a urethane Spill Dike system. They work quite well. Just lay them on the floor in the shape you want to keep water contained to one area. In your case, under the rigs. No tools, no adhesives. Just lay them down. Prices cary, but typically a few hundred dollars. They can be washed off if they get dirty and just lifted off the floor if and when you are going to wash and squeegie the bays.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.absorbentsonline.com/spil..._berm_dike.htm

    The ones i listed are 10' long. That should be more then adequate to keep the water contained under the rigs out of harms way. A Wet/Dry vac can be had for less then $200.00 (and has plenty of other practical uses at the station) and could be used to get any water pooling behind the dike instead of squeegie-ing it to the front of the bay and out the door.
    I have heard of this new EPA standard, as our current facility and our soon to be constructed facility both have oil separators. The part the EPA seems to miss, is even without drains all that water and oil have to go somewhere, it doesn't just disappear. Just more bone head bureacracy.

    Leave a comment:


  • WD6956
    replied
    Originally posted by tajm611 View Post
    Large squeegee on a broom handle.
    Push water outside


    /thread.
    Agreed, when their is no rigs in the bay. But you would be wetting the entire floor and making an even larger mess trying to squeegie the water around the rig and out the door. It would be a never ending battle witha rig in the bay that keeps dripping and you trying to move the water 50+ feet around it.

    Leave a comment:


  • WD6956
    replied
    The floor drains being ommited after a station overhaul was likley not an oversight. They have become an issue with EPA regs since they are plumbed into the sewer system typically, or worse, the storm drains. Putting floor drains in a facility where you have vehicles dripping oil is now an enviornmental issue. Anytime you have water flwoing, it's likley carrying oil and and possibly Antifreeze into the drains. Unless the department wanted to install seperators, it's easier (and cheaper) to just remove the drains. We have a railroad yard close by that was told they had to install an Oil/Water seperation system that was going to cost over a million dollars since the drainage system was piped to a river. So they opted for plan B. They filled the storm drain catch basins with cement.

    Your easiest solution without any permament modifications is to use a urethane Spill Dike system. They work quite well. Just lay them on the floor in the shape you want to keep water contained to one area. In your case, under the rigs. No tools, no adhesives. Just lay them down. Prices cary, but typically a few hundred dollars. They can be washed off if they get dirty and just lifted off the floor if and when you are going to wash and squeegie the bays.

    Here is an example:

    http://www.absorbentsonline.com/spil..._berm_dike.htm

    The ones i listed are 10' long. That should be more then adequate to keep the water contained under the rigs out of harms way. A Wet/Dry vac can be had for less then $200.00 (and has plenty of other practical uses at the station) and could be used to get any water pooling behind the dike instead of squeegie-ing it to the front of the bay and out the door.

    Leave a comment:


  • tajm611
    replied
    Large squeegee on a broom handle.
    Push water outside


    /thread.

    Leave a comment:


  • PaladinKnight
    replied
    Originally posted by Jrvrescue
    So, does anyone have any ideas or know of anything that we could put behind the vehicles as a water block/barrier to keep the water from pooling in the walkway?
    Yea... I have an idea...

    Find the guy that made the decision to remove the drains and make him lay down behind the trucks.

    He might not absorb much water, but he would learn from the experience.

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by LVFD301 View Post
    I am really having a hard time getting my head around this one.... No floor drains, no slope, what were they thinking?
    Yup. Like I said....Professor of Astrophysics...Maybe a Nuclear Physicist? Brain Surgeon? Rocket Scientist?

    And according to him, the drains were already there, and they "removed them."

    (slaps forehead.)

    Leave a comment:


  • LVFD301
    replied
    Originally posted by Jrvrescue View Post
    We have a problem with water dripping off our rigs and pooling behind them where we walk through the bay. We do not have drains in the floor anymore (went away when they remodeled the station), so when the rigs are put away wet, all the water just drips onto the floor and forms puddles. We (used loosely) have been trying to keep up with it using a mop to keep it dry, but it's just not working.
    Run the heat up? Have the idiot who remodeled without floor drains meet the equipment with a roll of paper towels? Point out to your insurance agent the fact you no longer have floor drains?

    I am really having a hard time getting my head around this one.... No floor drains, no slope, what were they thinking?

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Make whichever Professor of Astrophysics that deciced to eliminate the floor drains stand there permanently with a rubber floor sqeegee and a mop.

    Leave a comment:

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