Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Dispatch Center Determining Response Code?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    2. The Dispatchers are there to serve the Fire Department, the Fire Department is not there to serve the Dispatchers.
    Oh on the contrary! We tell them where to go! lol jk

    Dispatchers also have a job and and policy they have to follow.I will relay what the caller request or says (within reason, obviously no profanity on the radio as much as possible) no matter how crazy. Just the other day a women wanted a helicopter....in her back yard....just to fly around in it.
    Told the responding officer that and he requested an ALS unit for Altered mental status/psychiatric.And thats what it was dispatched as, we leave the running L&S up the the ALS unit. And alot of the information we might pass on it simply takes some of the liability off of the dispatch center.. ex: i have dispatched officers to a barking duck...and the officer went 10-8 as soon as i got done dispatching it. He knew about the call and didnt go only to find out the "barking duck" noises happened to be the neighbors truck on fire, it wasnt the dispatch centers fault he didnt go. The point is exactly what most everyone here said, Its the responding units discretion whether to run L&S.
    Fire scenes: A well organized cluster F......
    These are my veiws and opinions.....Im just saying

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by Chewy911 View Post
      And alot of the information we might pass on it simply takes some of the liability off of the dispatch center.. ex: i have dispatched officers to a barking duck...and the officer went 10-8 as soon as i got done dispatching it. He knew about the call and didnt go only to find out the "barking duck" noises happened to be the neighbors truck on fire, it wasnt the dispatch centers fault he didnt go.
      Chewy, I understand your perspective on liability, but there also has to be some point where we (I assume you're also a dispatcher) have to say '...yes, but we're also trained to know better...'. The claim 'I was only following orders' has been used to justify far too much horror in our history...

      Be safe.
      My opinions only.

      AGS-SGA 091101

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by DaFAO View Post
        Chewy, I understand your perspective on liability, but there also has to be some point where we (I assume you're also a dispatcher) have to say '...yes, but we're also trained to know better...'. The claim 'I was only following orders' has been used to justify far too much horror in our history...

        Be safe.
        Oh i agree 100%, of course if the caller says i only want one truck for a stove on fire in a house we dispatch a 1st alarm. If its a veichle off the roadway its dispatched as a MVA. just saying no matter how ridiculous it sounds, were just relaying the information.

        When in doubt send em out! lol
        Fire scenes: A well organized cluster F......
        These are my veiws and opinions.....Im just saying

        Comment


        • #19
          We must continually remind our dispatch staff to just pass on the info they get and let our officers and EMS crews make the decisions. This releases them from liability and allows our trained Fire/EMS personnel to make educated decisions based on the most info that we can get. Since the implementation of "plain text" dispatching/radio procedures, life is much easier. The dispatchers do advise us of a callers specific wishes, but as Harve noted, they are largely ignored as our SOP's dictate how we respond to most situations.

          Comment


          • #20
            Ok.......

            Originally posted by DaFAO View Post
            Chief, no one is anywhere to serve anyone in this discussion. Due respect, that's a pile of crap. In a perfect world, fire dispatchers and operations companies WORK TOGETHER to fix the problem. I don't know of any jurisdiction where this Utopian scenario perfectly exists, but I know of lots of places where there is always beef between operations and communications because of attitudes like that. And while we're taking jabs at each other, the citizens suffer, and we all wind up looking like jobbers.



            Chief, this fellow not once said anything about 'civilians'. For all we know, they could be sworn deputies working radio.
            Hope this helps...

            OK, you got me..... There are times, and this is one, I let personal experience get me ahead of the curve without realizing that others aren't aware of what I'm basing my opinion on. There is a jurisdiction here in Maryland that I'm quite familiar with, and they're close enough that I can listen to them on my Scanner. Their setup is such that the Dispatchers Dictate (No, Dictate is not too strong a word here) to everyone else. In an incident a couple of years back that I was listening to, a Chief who was IC on a Fire asked for two additional Engines. The Dispatcher asked why. There is a huge difference in asking an IC "why" when the Dispatcher needs to be able to provide that information to (For Instance) a Mutual Aid Dispatcher or a Dispatcher from another Agency (Police, etc.) as opposed to the Dispatcher just being a jerk. The place I'm referring to simply allows Dispatchers to do as they please, without requiring them to be responsible to anyone. Here, in Maryland, All the B.S. that flys back and forth between Police and Fire when the Police do the Dispatching is not a factor since all Fire Dispatching is done by Fire People, all Police Dispatching is done by Police people. All Dispatch Centers serve the Entire County where they are located, and all agencies in each County use their center. Everyone has and uses E911 exclusively. All in all, this is a good place, with good people, with the exception I mentioned above.



            Side Note: I think Deputy Chief Gonzo's reference to "Civilians" was about the Calling party, not the Dispatcher.
            Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
            In memory of
            Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
            Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

            IACOJ Budget Analyst

            I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

            www.gdvfd18.com

            Comment


            • #21
              Side Note: I think Deputy Chief Gonzo's reference to "Civilians" was about the Calling party, not the Dispatcher.
              Chief, this fellow not once said anything about 'civilians'. For all we know, they could be sworn deputies working radio.

              DaFAO... what I meant was civilians telling dispatch to "only send one truck", "don't use lights and sirens", or "it's a false alarm... you don't need to send anyone".

              When I was a company officer, I can't tell you how many times the RP cursed me out for "not doing what I told you"... my standard answer, always given in a polite yet firm tone was "Madam/Sir... you do not dictate fire department response policy".
              Last edited by DeputyChiefGonzo; 01-16-2011, 10:45 AM.
              ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
              Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

              Comment


              • #22
                Side Note: I think Deputy Chief Gonzo's reference to "Civilians" was about the Calling party, not the Dispatcher.
                Harve... bingo!
                ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
                Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

                Comment


                • #23
                  Thank Ewe, Thank Ewe............

                  Originally posted by DeputyChiefGonzo View Post
                  Harve... bingo!

                  I guess it's because I've sat on the other side of the Mike too........
                  Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                  In memory of
                  Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                  Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                  IACOJ Budget Analyst

                  I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                  www.gdvfd18.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by DeputyChiefGonzo View Post
                    DaFAO... what I meant was civilians telling dispatch to "only send one truck", "don't use lights and sirens", or "it's a false alarm... you don't need to send anyone".
                    My apologies, Chief G. I misunderstood your statement, sir.

                    Chief Harve, I understand what you're saying. My hunch is that the jurisdiction you are referring to is farther up I-70, and begins with A*** A****** OR H***** OR F********. I hope it wouldn't be others...But I still firmly believe that we gotta work together on emergency calls, cause if we don't, Dave Statter will be on it like flies on $h!t.

                    Be safe.
                    LONG LIVE TW18.
                    My opinions only.

                    AGS-SGA 091101

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Our dispatch center uses EMD and EFD to ask the questions of the caller and then assign it a response code. Our policy dictates the response depending on the response level from dispatch(alpha, bravo, charlie, delta, and echo). The truck officer can upgrade or downgrade the response based on what information that dispatch is giving. It is not a perfect system but it what it is.

                      As for what the caller wants they don't always get. It goes back to the dispatch level. If the caller requested no lights we will usually turn them off before we get there.

                      Example of it not working so well is a 'falls' call code at an alpha level. While en route dispatch advises that the patient had fallen off a horse. A little bit later dispatch advised that the horse was still on the patient. The truck officer upgraded our response. Arrived to find the patient pinned between a down tree and the horse lying on top of him.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Ok.............

                        Originally posted by dafao View Post
                        my apologies, chief g. I misunderstood your statement, sir.

                        Chief harve, i understand what you're saying. My hunch is that the jurisdiction you are referring to is farther up i-70, and begins with a*** a****** or h***** or f********. I hope it wouldn't be others...but i still firmly believe that we gotta work together on emergency calls, cause if we don't, dave statter will be on it like flies on $h!t.

                        be safe.
                        Long live tw18.


                        Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                        In memory of
                        Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                        Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                        IACOJ Budget Analyst

                        I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                        www.gdvfd18.com

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          My apologies, Chief G. I misunderstood your statement, sir.
                          No problem!
                          ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
                          Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Our dispatchers only relay what is given to them. They sometimes do advise that another department is available for MA or whether another department is not available for MA. But for the most part what they give us is needed. So if what they say is not actually what is happening it is not there fault. We generally Code 3 to everything unless one of us is already aware of what is going on and we can downgrade responding units.

                            I would suggest that you do some research on your own. What does state laws and regulations say for you to do? That will supersedes anything local or civilian wants you to do (Ex. our states says if lights are on sirens are on).

                            I think you are on the right track to get answers but unless we are in your state, county, city and/or district, I don't think anyone here can give you the correct answer. Besides there will always be someone saying your wrong no matter what you do.

                            Comment

                            300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                            Collapse

                            Upper 300x250

                            Collapse

                            Taboola

                            Collapse

                            Leader

                            Collapse
                            Working...
                            X