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  • #46
    Originally posted by ChiefKN View Post
    Did you just agree with him that you are 100% right?


    You are smoooothh...

    Yes I am... I also agreed with his assessment of dispatchers learning where they are sending the troops....
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

    Comment


    • #47
      Originally posted by snowball View Post
      Not quite. I was at the Gap once trying on underwear, you know, the boxer briefs with the junk pouch. I was probably on my third or fourth pair of sample underwear when I accidentally knocked the dressing room door open with my butt while bending over to take them off. You could hear screams, laughter, and gasps. I was humiliated. I ran out of the store and headed straight for Orange Julius before getting to my car. It was then that I realized I had hung my keys on the stupid hook in the dressing room. Feeling deflated I walked back into the store to retrieve my keys. The stares from the shoppers burned my skin. I hope you can take my advise on this, never, never, never, stand too close to the dressing room door when trying on sample underwear.
      Boxer briefs are the way to go, never be ashamed.
      I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

      "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

      "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

      Comment


      • #48
        Its funny I mentioned how streets get confusing in our area we just had it last night. Paged to 190th street and Y avenue for a snowmobile accident on a trail. We only have one Y avenue so that told us what county its in. But it was a toss up as far as what 190th street to go to. It delayed our response time a minute or two because we had to get dispatch to clarify which way to go.

        Any ideas to solve this?

        Comment


        • #49
          Field Experience needed in Dispatch!

          The County Fire Department I used to dispatch for (before I retired after 32 years) has had an influx of new Dispatcher's in the last few years with little (or no) street or field experience.

          In the meantime, the old timers (in Dispatch and in the Field) have been retiring left and right, taking years of street experience with us, leaving Dispatch, Suppression and Rescue with little real world experience.

          Book knowledge is nice to have, but what often means success or failure of the mission, is the tried and true street experience, that takes time to acquire.

          Now there is nothing wrong with being young or new, I was one myself once, but what the County (and others) don't realize is that you can't buy street experience like you can buy or fill chairs in the Dispatch Center.

          The County (in it's infinite wisdom) has been hiring people with NO Medical or Fire street experience and depending on flipcharts to screen calls, in fact, basic street experience is NOT a requirement anymore!

          Even though nationwide (and with us) the majority of calls are Rescue, the new people have a lack of Fire knowledge, I quizzed a young girl before I retired, as to what was a hand line, a gated Y, a courtyard lay, and so forth, and was met with a blank stare!

          And to top it all off, the Dispatch Center Manager (who used to work in the Field) won't allow Field Personnel (with proper training) to work in the Dispatch Center to help raise the experience level.

          Experience comes with time, both in Dispatch and on the street, and while the new people hopefully gain street knowledge somehow, let's hope we can make it without someone (in the Field or the Public) being killed in the process!

          Sorry about the long post, I get going sometimes.

          Comment


          • #50
            Originally posted by Rodney15 View Post
            The County Fire Department I used to dispatch for (before I retired after 32 years) has had an influx of new Dispatcher's in the last few years with little (or no) street or field experience.

            In the meantime, the old timers (in Dispatch and in the Field) have been retiring left and right, taking years of street experience with us, leaving Dispatch, Suppression and Rescue with little real world experience.

            Book knowledge is nice to have, but what often means success or failure of the mission, is the tried and true street experience, that takes time to acquire.

            Now there is nothing wrong with being young or new, I was one myself once, but what the County (and others) don't realize is that you can't buy street experience like you can buy or fill chairs in the Dispatch Center.

            The County (in it's infinite wisdom) has been hiring people with NO Medical or Fire street experience and depending on flipcharts to screen calls, in fact, basic street experience is NOT a requirement anymore!

            Even though nationwide (and with us) the majority of calls are Rescue, the new people have a lack of Fire knowledge, I quizzed a young girl before I retired, as to what was a hand line, a gated Y, a courtyard lay, and so forth, and was met with a blank stare!

            And to top it all off, the Dispatch Center Manager (who used to work in the Field) won't allow Field Personnel (with proper training) to work in the Dispatch Center to help raise the experience level.

            Experience comes with time, both in Dispatch and on the street, and while the new people hopefully gain street knowledge somehow, let's hope we can make it without someone (in the Field or the Public) being killed in the process!

            Sorry about the long post, I get going sometimes.
            Rant on... because in the end, when the excremental matter hits the rotating, oscillating air movement device, the media and the polticians will put the blame on the FD!
            ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
            Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

            Comment


            • #51
              Quote from Chief Gonzo: Rant on... because in the end, when the excremental matter hits the rotating, oscillating air movement device, the media and the politicians will put the blame on the FD!

              Amen to that Brother, the local media (especially the TV News) are like wolves zeroing in on the kill, and you're right, one mistake from one of these new Dispatcher's and the public jumps all over the Field unit's, "Where have you been, it's been ___ minutes since we called" (You fill in the blank!)

              About a year before I retired, a new girl took a call, reporting a diving accident at a popular swimming spot on a local river, and I knew right where it was; the ONLY problem was, the Dispatcher entered (into the CAD) an intersection, on a major Highway in a local town, FIVE miles away from the incident.

              I told her that there were two different locations here, and was she certain it was at the swimming hole, and she played the tapes back, and said Yes it was, so I dispatched the apparatus to the swimming hole and we went straight to the incident.

              Needless to say, there was a slight delay (maybe less than a minute) but if an experienced Dispatcher had not caught this snafu, the delay would have been enormous, and of course the FD would get the first blame.

              It's just a matter of time here before the **** hits the fan.

              Comment


              • #52
                CGITCH/Rodney15 - Technology is probably your answer there. Sounds like the call came in from a cell phone (not many "old swimming holes" or snowmobile trails have landline service), in which case GPS or tower information would have narrowed down your problem somewhat.

                If it was landline and you aren't using E-9-1-1 yet, your answer is right there.

                Unfortunately technology costs money.

                We have three "route 12's" that intersect with the same state highway. Two of those intersections are also state highways, the other is a county highway. As long as we can get the right township and county/state designation, we can usually sort them out.

                Still, there's nothing much you can do about operator headspace besides education and experience.

                It doesn't help any when the technology lets you down, as it did for a structure fire here last week where the 9-1-1 call (via a cable provider) was routed to Colorado first, resulting in a 44 second delay before our local PSAP was given the call. The building was likely a goner by the time the call was initially made, but the implications of the delay are pretty obvious.

                Some years ago we had a kidnapping case. The experienced dispatcher was familiar with the area involved and was able to integrate incoming intelligence with the location of the responding patrols. She sounded like an air traffic controller.

                They caught the guy in a gravel pit well off the road before he was able to harm the kid.

                We've also had the same problem with new dispatchers. They aren't any better on the law enforcement side, either.

                The railroads have the answer. A dispatch has to be "qualified" on the subject stretch of railroad, and is usually required to refresh once a year on each segment they dispatch. That would be the equivalent of a ride-along with a cop, or with a BC or maybe a medic unit in a busy fire department.
                Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

                Comment


                • #53
                  I don't think its necessarily a technological problem here. Granted our trucks don't have MDT's but our first outs do have GPS in them and dispatch can track us to tell us where to go. We are dispatched by the sheriff's department, located in a town on the opposite end of the county. Any calls that are in our other two counties covered are re-routed to our dispatch center and we are paged from there. I think its just a problem of dispatchers not knowing our area and how the roads are labeled. Its hard enough living here and driving them everyday.

                  I know exactly how cell towers make things even more difficult. We were once paged to a structure fire 2 districts over because it pinged a tower in our response area. I wasn't on it, but its about a 20 minute drive to the residence and we were still first arriving.
                  Last edited by CGITCH; 01-09-2011, 02:29 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    9-1-1 and Cell Phones

                    Yeah, I know about the cell phone situation, when they don't drop the signal, they're nice to have in an emergency (with a well informed caller!)

                    Before I retired, I used to grumble that cell phones were going to be the death of me yet, needless to say this always brought about a laugh in the room.

                    If memory serves me right, it was a cell phone from the scene, but I don't recall if the caller was familiar with the location or not.

                    And I'm pretty sure it wasn't enhanced 9-1-1, but even if it was, I don't believe we had enhanced in the Dispatch Center then (always about $$$).

                    But in this particular case, it was an inexperienced Dispatcher who didn't know the area just yet, but bless her heart, she made a concerted effort to learn, and before I left, I helped mentor her (not bragging here), and I believe she became a better Dispatcher.

                    Now if we only had more old timers willing to teach and more new hires willing to learn.

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Originally posted by Rodney15 View Post

                      The County (in it's infinite wisdom) has been hiring people with NO Medical or Fire street experience and depending on flipcharts to screen calls, in fact, basic street experience is NOT a requirement anymore!
                      Rodney, I don't disagree with what you're saying, but I would submit that a dispatcher(s) not having any time on company does not equate to an inferior employee. There are lots of ways to work through that, including the ride times that Chief Gonzo made out, joining a local buff or canteen club and going to greater alarm stuff, and reading and learning from company guys and gals about what its like on their side of the mic.

                      Conversely, there exist several examples of sworn personnel working in communications who do not want to be there, are disciplinary issues, or on light duty with no experience in the field. A dispatcher should know that a trash line isn't code for a bad joke, or that layin' a line isn't a pick-up method at the local bar. In that same respect, any firefighter working at communications (voluntarily or not) should know what Phase I, Phase II, VoIP, and C-LECs are...

                      It works both ways....Be safe!
                      My opinions only.

                      AGS-SGA 091101

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        I agree with you, it's just that I got so mad (and frustrated) when lives were jeopardized, both in the public and also in the field units, by dispatchers who were too lazy to learn (or do) their jobs!

                        Now don't get me wrong, the vast majority of Dispatchers, both locally and nationwide are a exceptionally well trained group of dedicated individuals who really care about doing a fine job for whatever comes along.

                        And I'm not saying I was the next best thing to come along since sliced bread, but I went the extra mile in my training and dispatching for the troops/public (such as my still "famous" Rolodex!)

                        Not bragging at all, but on my days off, I would explore areas that baffled me while on duty, sort of like "territory study", this I learned from a man who first trained me!

                        However after I retired, the s**t hit the fan, when on two different occasions, two different individuals FORGOT to enter a call, and went on to do something else (if memory serves me well, one went to the can and one went on break!)

                        Needless to say, after a disciplinary hearing was completed, they were let go, and fortunely no one died, but the potential was there.

                        Now that I'm retired, I shouldn't care so much, but I do; I still have a lot of friends in the Department (not to mention in the public) who I don't want to see get hurt!

                        Comment

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