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  • #16
    Originally posted by LVFD301 View Post
    OMG....

    1. Batteries. On the older Nicad batteries, there was a school of thought that said you should drain down the batteries once a month, there also was a school of thought that led to an electrical reversal of one of the cells in the battery. Best to use a conditioner. On the batteries most often used on professional radios now, lithium ion etc, it is not needed, and can lead to premature death of the battery. Any bulk use of two way radios should include battery conditioners

    2. Blasting. Yes, it might be possible, if the moon is in perfect alignment with Jupiter and Mars, you hold your tongue right, and if the user is standing on one foot, for a radio to set off a blasting cap - and you would have to be close enough. I can't remember seeing it happen once in the past 30 years. It is still a slim possibility however, so I question where you got your range information from?

    3. The radio ID plate. Wow. Can you name one instance where this has been an FCC issue on a type certified or authorized piece of equipment? It is required to be there during the sale, but 10 years down the road no.
    I got the table from the SCHP Operations Manual under it's radio section.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by TonedOut1985 View Post
      We log the serial numbers when we issue them out. That's what they're there for.

      Simple rules: don't get them wet, don't keep liquids near them.
      KJ4VKC
      If you buy a decent radio you don;t need to worry about getting them wet, We are in the business of spraying water on things after all.

      Ours are submersible to 1 meter for three hours without any effect.

      When they demonstrated them to us they had several sitting in a fish tank on the table full of water. They'd reach in and pull one out to show us the features then drop it back in and grab another one to continue with the demonstration.
      It all depends on the Rating from the manufacturer, most of the BIG boys are only rated for occasional spray or mist.

      LV knows which radio I'm talking about ! :-}

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      • #18
        For us, everyone is issued a radio, spare battery, case and a charger. Most of the paid staff leave their radio at the station. A couple of guys put their radio in their locker the rest leave them in their gear. For the volunteer side they all have their radio at home or carry it with them in their car. The department pays for all repairs unless you do something really stupid to destroy the radio.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Not2L84U2 View Post
          We are an all career department and we already have enough funding and have purchased enough radios for every member. Now that they are almost here there is question arising as to what to do with them and where they are to be kept when off duty. Some people don't want to have the responsibility of having them issued to them. Others fear that some members may forget their radios or loose them. I think these are all chances we take, but the benefit of having a radio for each members should far out weight the risk. Just trying to find if there are other departments that are doing the same thing and if they have procedures to address such instances.
          We are an all career department also and have had individually assigned radios for a couple of years now. We have no policy. Instead we have chosen (whether consciously or unconsciously) to treat our personnel like adults regarding all individually issued equipment.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by FireMedic049 View Post
            Instead we have chosen (whether consciously or unconsciously) to treat our personnel like adults regarding all individually issued equipment.
            These are firefighters, right? What a brave move!

            I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

            "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

            "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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            • #21
              We just switched from having radios for each seat on the truck to individually assigned since a lot of the time members riding had assigned radios anyways and it helped to outfit new members with radios without having to buy a lot of new ones. Each radio has an identifier that is the personells unit number. has the serial number recorded and they are responsible for them. I think almost all our members if not all take theirs home and have chargers there. I would try the responsible for their own and if that does not work then require that they stay at the station. The only issue with everything at the station is keeping them charged but if you have enough outlets and chargers you should be okay.

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              • #22
                Our Dept is the same way, each seat has its assigned portable. Officer portables as well are assigned to the seat, and not the person.

                Same here. HQ staff are assigned their own.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by TonedOut1985 View Post
                  Remember to completely discharge the battery before recharging AT LEAST once a month to prevent "memory".
                  Myth. This has never been practically true for the radios in use in the fire service and more NiCads were killed in trying to avoid memory by reversing the cells in deep discharge than EVER saw memory effect.

                  Modern radios with their computer charging and NiMH or LiOn packs not only don't have memory effect but the batteries circuit will preclude any memory or excessively deep discharging.

                  You should be able to just drop the thing in the charger without worrying about it.

                  [Used to do battery research in the 70's with NiCads.]

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                  • #24
                    In my Department, everyone has a pager and a radio issued to them along with a charger for both items. Most of us keep our pagers on us at all times. How we carry our radios' varies a bit. I keep my radio with me throughout the day. usually it lives in my gear bag when I'm not using it and is kept in my car unless it is very hot in the summer or if I leave my car for more then half an hour or so during the winter so the Battery doesn't freeze or get so cold there isn't a usable charge.

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                    • #25
                      Most people are issued a pager and charger and expected to keep them charged. Captains and above are issued radios. They are expected to keep them charged. I keep mine in my vehicle most of the time and swap out batteries every so often.

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                      • #26
                        Afternoon fellas,

                        We're running into an issue with our guys on the fireground getting feeback from each other's portables. Happens even in the rig en route to the call. I looked around previous posts think I found the answer: Cover your lapel mic if someone else is keying up and talking. I found it in this closed thread:
                        "Feedback on Lapell Mics"
                        http://www.firehouse.com/forums/t115307/

                        Just wondering about your depts. Does everyone on the fireground that has a portable have it ON at all times? I would assume yes. If ON, are you scanning or locked onto 1 channel?


                        Thanks for your thoughts.
                        ~Skojo



                        I found another related post worth reading, especially if you are new to this forum.
                        "A Radio For Every Firefighter"
                        http://www.firehouse.com/forums/t124398/

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          It can and does happen on our scenes - sometimes among command staff, which may be from several different fire departments.

                          Because all crew members on the railroad I volunteer with have radios, it's second nature to me to reach for my mic when someone near me is about to key up.

                          For safety reasons, we need to keep our radios on. If I call a crew member and they don't answer, I have an immediate concern for their welfare. Usually it means they just weren't listening, or turned their radio down for some reason. Either gets a stern reprimand from me.
                          Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                          Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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                          • #28
                            We have Motorola radios on a 800 system. We had the same problem until recently. Our radio tech discovered that the microphone gain was set too high. They were able to go into the system and adjust it for a couple of our companies as a test. Now our crews can be right next to each other with radios at full volume and transmit with no feedback. They are currently reprogramming all of the radios. The only concern was that the user might have to talk more directly into the mic because the gain was reduced. But this hasn't proven to be a problem. The mics still seem to be picking up our voices just fine.

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                            • #29
                              [QUOTE=Skojo;1353765]We're running into an issue with our guys on the fireground getting feeback from each other's portables. Happens even in the rig en route to the call. I looked around previous posts think I found the answer: Cover your lapel mic if someone else is keying up and talking. QUOTE]

                              We have this issue as well. Like tree said, I've try to cover my lapel mic when I know somebody close is going to key up. I've also gotten into a habit of turning away from other radios when I'm getting ready to key up. The more inconvient issue is feedback from speakers on the rigs. Can't cover them, just have to move away from the rig.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Every Firefighter & Officer in my house (100% volunteer) is issued a portable radio which can be left at station or kept at home. Then EVERY officer has a mobile radio in their personal vehicle. Firefighters use their personal id and check in route to station unless they are an emt then they can go the the scene. Officer's use their unit number to check in route to station or scene.
                                Lieutenant
                                Joel Chouinard
                                Rescue Co. 106 "When Push Comes To Shove"
                                Engine Co. 307 "Pride Of The South Side"
                                Cairns Leather, the only choice!

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