Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Signficant Fires

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Signficant Fires

    I'm compiling a list of significant fires that have occurred in American history. Specifically those fires that have had a impact on public awareness, fire codes, and/or fireground strategy and tactics. What incidents do you consider significant in American Fire Service history?

  • #2
    Originally posted by jlcooke3 View Post
    I'm compiling a list of significant fires that have occurred in American history. Specifically those fires that have had a impact on public awareness, fire codes, and/or fireground strategy and tactics. What incidents do you consider significant in American Fire Service history?
    Iriqouis Theatre
    Cocoanut Grove
    Beverly Hills Supper Club
    MGM Hotel
    Triangle Shirtwaist
    Our Lady of Angels schhol
    Texas City
    Kansas City
    Worcester Cold Storage
    Charleston Super Sofa
    ...and the list goes on
    The thoughts and opinions posted here are mine and mine alone and do not reflect the thoughts and or views of city or dept affiliation.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by jccrabby3084 View Post
      Iriqouis Theatre
      Cocoanut Grove
      Beverly Hills Supper Club
      MGM Hotel
      Triangle Shirtwaist
      Our Lady of Angels schhol
      Texas City
      Kansas City
      Worcester Cold Storage
      Charleston Super Sofa
      ...and the list goes on
      Dont forget the Happyland Social Club and the Station Nightclub fire.
      "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

      Comment


      • #4
        Well of course there's Chicago, Peshtigo, San Fran earthquake/fires, etc....

        Osage Ave./MOVE incident, 1985
        One Meridian Plaza, 1991

        Suprised 9/11 not mentioned yet.


        See also:
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_historic_fires
        Opinions expressed are mine alone, and do not necessarily reflect those of the Philadelphia Fire Department and/or IAFF Local 22.

        Comment


        • #5
          A few lesser publicized fires occurred in on and off campus college dorms and frat houses. Prompted sprinkler legislation in dorms and increased off campus student housing inspections.


          Bloomsburg University (BSD frat house)October 1994, killed 5.
          University North Carolina (PhiGD frat house) May 1996, killed 5.
          Seton Hall University (Boland Hall) January 2000, killed 3.
          Bloomsburg University (TKE frat house) March 2000, killed 3.

          In 2005 there were 3300 college housing fires, and between 2002 and 2005 there were 39 deaths, over 400 injuries. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20381637...ews-education/
          ~Drew
          Firefighter/EMT/Technical Rescue
          USAR TF Rescue Specialist

          Comment


          • #6
            Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ on Jan. 19, 2000, a fire killed three students and injured 58 others.

            The fire inside six-story Boland Hall was deliberately set. The New Jersey Legislature swiftly acted to prevent another tragedy in the state. The New Jersey Senate unanimously passed a bill (SB 891) requiring the state’s public and private colleges and universities to install sprinkler systems in all existing buildings used to house students. The legislation is unprecedented because it also applies to sorority and fraternity houses, as well as to boarding and military schools with dorms.

            The act requires sprinkler installation to be completed in four years.

            Almost a year after the deadly fire, a fire started in a trash can in Boland Hall.
            Fortunately, a sprinkler system had been installed. One sprinkler head activated and extinguished the fire without any
            reported injuries to the 600 residents.

            http://www.csg.org/knowledgecenter/d...Sprinklers.pdf
            Fire Sprinklers Save Firefighters’ Lives Too!

            Comment


            • #7
              None. They stay in the spotlight for a couple of weeks and then the fire service is fighting for scraps again.

              Within 12 months of the terrorist attacks in NYC on 9-11, the FDNY was closing companies.
              Last edited by MemphisE34a; 12-04-2010, 07:03 PM.
              RK
              cell #901-494-9437

              Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

              "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


              Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

              Comment


              • #8
                Beverly Hills Super Club in Southgate Ky city is located in Northern KY 2 mile south of Cincinnati Just south of Newport KY
                Killed 165 people mostly in the cabaret room. emptied out three counties in ambulances and fire equipment. had equipment responding from as far away as supposedly Mason Ohio. Changed electrical codes and occupancy codes mostly on how many people can be in a room and how many exits and means of egress are needed. Also made changes about Al wiring in buildings. up to 500 responders. building had been modified several times with and without permits. This fire is one of the first enterprise liability lawsuits in US history. All and their was another major fire at a company called Duro Paper bag that same night in Kenton County which borders the county Southgate is in.
                http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beverly...pper_Club_fire
                http://www.kentonlibrary.org/genphotos/index.cfm type in Beverly Hills and a box on the left will have a selection and click on the fires heading. the 100 or so acres still stands vacant to this day

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MemphisE34a View Post
                  None. They stay in the spotlight for a couple of weeks and then the fire service is fightign for scraps again.

                  Within 12 months of the terrorist attacks in NYC on 9-11, the FDNY was closing companies.
                  co-signed...
                  IAFF

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by jlcooke3 View Post
                    I'm compiling a list of significant fires that have occurred in American history. Specifically those fires that have had a impact on public awareness, fire codes, and/or fireground strategy and tactics. What incidents do you consider significant in American Fire Service history?
                    the eastland disaster....not a fire, but significant in "american fire service history." in chicago this was the first time the fire department was called for an incident that was not a fire.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by InsuranceLCRep View Post
                      Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ on Jan. 19, 2000, a fire killed three students and injured 58 others.

                      The fire inside six-story Boland Hall was deliberately set. The New Jersey Legislature swiftly acted to prevent another tragedy in the state. The New Jersey Senate unanimously passed a bill (SB 891) requiring the state’s public and private colleges and universities to install sprinkler systems in all existing buildings used to house students. The legislation is unprecedented because it also applies to sorority and fraternity houses, as well as to boarding and military schools with dorms.

                      The act requires sprinkler installation to be completed in four years.

                      Almost a year after the deadly fire, a fire started in a trash can in Boland Hall.
                      Fortunately, a sprinkler system had been installed. One sprinkler head activated and extinguished the fire without any
                      reported injuries to the 600 residents.

                      http://www.csg.org/knowledgecenter/d...Sprinklers.pdf
                      Not only did this have an impact on NJ, but was also the catalyst for the Campus Fire Safety Act in NYS which requires all colleges, public and private to be inspected by OFPC, AND sets forth punishment in the way of fines for identified violations that are not corrected in a timely manner. Anywhere from $50- to $500- per day/per violation.....

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        If you can get a hold of Dennis Smith's "A History of Firefighting" he discusses several landmark fires.

                        Just remember that fires that killed a large number of firefighters may not be significant, if you define "significant" as providing a platform for changes in fire codes and building construction, as often multi-LODD incidents cause little change in those areas. They are significant within the firefighting community but often not significant beyond that.
                        Train to fight the fires you fight.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          And............

                          There have been quite a few Fires over the years that were not definable as a specific Structure alone. What we now refer to as the Wildland Urban Interface Fire problem is one heck of a lot older that the Descriptive Term is. WUI Fires started happening as soon as the white man reached the shores of North America. There are numerous examples of WUI Fires that had some kind of impact, including Storm King Mountain, Colorado, where 14 LODDs occured. My pick for the Major Impact of Wildfire would have to be the Southern California Fires of the early 50s. It's a long and convoluted trail, but as a result of the Fires in that era, work started on the "Firescope" Project which has resulted in today's "NIMS" Incident Management System.......
                          Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                          In memory of
                          Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                          Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                          IACOJ Budget Analyst

                          I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                          www.gdvfd18.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by hwoods View Post
                            There have been quite a few Fires over the years that were not definable as a specific Structure alone. What we now refer to as the Wildland Urban Interface Fire problem is one heck of a lot older that the Descriptive Term is. WUI Fires started happening as soon as the white man reached the shores of North America. There are numerous examples of WUI Fires that had some kind of impact, including Storm King Mountain, Colorado, where 14 LODDs occured. My pick for the Major Impact of Wildfire would have to be the Southern California Fires of the early 50s. It's a long and convoluted trail, but as a result of the Fires in that era, work started on the "Firescope" Project which has resulted in today's "NIMS" Incident Management System.......
                            Certainly some of the wildland fires in the Los Angeles area back in the 60's and 70's would be significant, as well as the Oakland Hills fire in 1992 (I think).
                            Train to fight the fires you fight.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
                              If you can get a hold of Dennis Smith's "A History of Firefighting" he discusses several landmark fires.

                              Just remember that fires that killed a large number of firefighters may not be significant, if you define "significant" as providing a platform for changes in fire codes and building construction, as often multi-LODD incidents cause little change in those areas. They are significant within the firefighting community but often not significant beyond that.
                              Hey Meat Head, here was the original question:

                              I'm compiling a list of significant fires that have occurred in American history. Specifically those fires that have had a impact on public awareness, fire codes, and/or fireground strategy and tactics. What incidents do you consider significant in American Fire Service history?

                              All of the fires quoted thus far either had a significant impact on building codes, construction, or strategy and tactics.

                              Oh, wait....Silly me. None of these fires involved standing in the front yards of the property, therefore you having no knowledge of them. I apologize.
                              "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X