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Strip Mall Fires....

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  • slackjawedyokel
    replied
    Couple of questions - first why do you call yourself madFIREFIGHTER bill if you are not yet a firefighter ? And second (I know I am going to get bashed for saying this ) - If you are going to be a fireman - about all you need to know about strip mall fires is listen to your officer. Dont put the cart before the horse --- learn the tasks first --- tactics second and strategy third. Dont be the guy that can spout out some strategy he learned on the net , but fumbles around trying to couple hose.

    Leave a comment:


  • OSD122
    replied
    I have a copy of our 37 page manual on strip shopping center fires. If you want a copy, let me know.


    Originally posted by MadFireFighterBill View Post
    Hello,

    I hope all is well...

    I'm a first year student and my teacher the other day was explaining how deadly strip mall fires can be. I was wondering if anyone has any first hand experience in dealing with a strip mall fire? What are some of the main hazards to avoid and be on the lookout for? The class ended early and we never returned to the topic but it was one of the more interesting lectures he has given this semester. Where I reside there is a large amount of strip malls in the area and I'm certain that when I become a firefighter I will end up battling one. I'm also going to try and ask the teacher to return to the topic but last time I asked he blew me off. My friend who is a firefighter told me about this forum and to give it a try so any helpful advice would be awesome. BTW nice to meet cha....

    thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • snowball
    replied
    Originally posted by FiremanLyman View Post
    Here is a good tactic picked up from Chief Laskey.

    When venting the front of a strip mall, leave one window intact for each two windows you take out. Reasoning: there is not much structural support on the front side of a strip mall (all windows, not much structural support). These windows you leave intact will be the indicator for the structure weakening, when they crack and break on their own the front side of the building is about to come down. The other sides are usually masonry and you'll see signs of damage on them.
    I like this.

    Leave a comment:


  • BW21
    replied
    Originally posted by mrpita View Post
    Also lightweight truss/crap construction resulting in less tenable durations for interior ops. They're popular because they're cheaply built = disposable construction.
    Not only that... They are cheaply built but they paid the lowest bidder to build it :-)

    Also I've seen them with false windows to try and dress the buildings up.. It's a lot more common than you would think.

    Leave a comment:


  • fire49
    replied
    Lots of unknown materials stored inside

    Extra doors blocked

    Extra doors secured in some manner

    Doors blocked on the inside and no signage on the outside designating it blocked

    No fire protection systems

    People sleeping in them at night

    Security bars, roll down doors, etc on front side

    Leave a comment:


  • FiremanLyman
    replied
    Here is a good tactic picked up from Chief Laskey.

    When venting the front of a strip mall, leave one window intact for each two windows you take out. Reasoning: there is not much structural support on the front side of a strip mall (all windows, not much structural support). These windows you leave intact will be the indicator for the structure weakening, when they crack and break on their own the front side of the building is about to come down. The other sides are usually masonry and you'll see signs of damage on them.

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    businesses moving in and out and expanding can give the building a very interesting interior layout as walls are put in or deleted to suit the current tenants. Also the use of the occupancy can change over time, so if sprinklers are present they might not be adequate.
    Last edited by nameless; 11-02-2010, 12:48 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • mrpita
    replied
    Also lightweight truss/crap construction resulting in less tenable durations for interior ops. They're popular because they're cheaply built = disposable construction.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeputyChiefGonzo
    replied
    Hazards of strip mall fires....
    Lightweight steel construction. Most of these strip malls have all of the HVAC equipment on the roof... which is lightweight corrugated steel over lightweight steel web trusses.

    Variable fire load.

    Lack of fire detection and suppression systems give any fire a good head start.

    Leave a comment:


  • MadFireFighterBill
    started a topic Strip Mall Fires....

    Strip Mall Fires....

    Hello,

    I hope all is well...

    I'm a first year student and my teacher the other day was explaining how deadly strip mall fires can be. I was wondering if anyone has any first hand experience in dealing with a strip mall fire? What are some of the main hazards to avoid and be on the lookout for? The class ended early and we never returned to the topic but it was one of the more interesting lectures he has given this semester. Where I reside there is a large amount of strip malls in the area and I'm certain that when I become a firefighter I will end up battling one. I'm also going to try and ask the teacher to return to the topic but last time I asked he blew me off. My friend who is a firefighter told me about this forum and to give it a try so any helpful advice would be awesome. BTW nice to meet cha....

    thanks

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