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  • MemphisE34a
    replied
    Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
    COME ON DOWN! As long as you don't do anything INCREDIBLY stupid,we'll get along just fine. I CAN tie my shoes and when the schit hits the fan I'll be right there with you. AND I won't tattle but if you do something DUMB you WILL know I Noticed. T.C.
    Sounds fair to me pal! Maybe I should have said "some" instead of one or two.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    Around me, the "safety Officer" would have gotten an invitation to keep his pie hole shut and take any issue he had up with that individuals officer.

    There might be one or two good ones out there, but most "Safety Officers" that I have had to deal with, especially in small departments, are scared of tying their shoes and seem to only excel at tattling.
    COME ON DOWN! As long as you don't do anything INCREDIBLY stupid,we'll get along just fine. I CAN tie my shoes and when the schit hits the fan I'll be right there with you. AND I won't tattle but if you do something DUMB you WILL know I Noticed. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    We don't have a policy on helmet accessories, except that members are not allowed to, in any way, cover the large identification numbers on each side of the helmet.

    That being said, it's basically impossible to put a band around the helmet and carry flashlights, chocks or anything else without partially blocking the numbers or the EMS star of life in the rear.
    If you wear salad bowls that would be TRUE. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • JMac73
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    We don't have a policy on helmet accessories, except that members are not allowed to, in any way, cover the large identification numbers on each side of the helmet.

    That being said, it's basically impossible to put a band around the helmet and carry flashlights, chocks or anything else without partially blocking the numbers or the EMS star of life in the rear.
    OK, I can see not wanting to cover up a unit identifier but why would anyone care about covering up a star of life on the back of your helmet?

    Leave a comment:


  • JMac73
    replied
    There might be one or two good ones out there, but most "Safety Officers" that I have had to deal with, especially in small departments, are scared of tying their shoes and seem to only excel at tattling.


    I hear ya, don't know of too many safety officers that I were ever considered to be even semi aggressive fireman

    Leave a comment:


  • Jasper 45
    replied
    'ISO' really means "Incident Snitch Officer".

    Originally posted by JohnVBFD View Post
    I wonder if all these departments with SOP/SOG's on whether or not you can have something on your helmet in the name of "safety", have SOP/SOG's on the duties and responsibilities of the first and second due engines and ladders also.
    Probably the most accurate statement I have seen.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChiefKN
    replied
    I got a band..with some chocks.

    If that caused me to be entrapped, then I would be very feeble and probably couldn't actually hold up the weight of the helmet with nothing attached.

    I think the shield would probably be a bigger risk of getting snagged then a few simple chocks and a rubber band. That whole "simple machine" aspect of an "inclined plane" figures into this situation at some point.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    Every one to their own taste.

    If some could they would try to put a Hurst tool on the helmet!

    Our policy was [is] simple, Add or subtract nothing from any PPE that wasn't there when issued!

    Some didn't like it and complained only to loose. The Chief of Departmrnt issues guidelines. If we agree or not, it's the procedure.

    For me, I just really don't like a lot of extra on the old lid, as it is heavy enough with adding more to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • jmitchell
    replied
    Originally posted by MemphisE34a View Post
    This policy would serve me well. I am currently however, more concerned with doing "the right thing", which is rarely what an administrator thinks "is right".
    Exactly...welcome to my world. We have become pretty good at the ol' head nod and "yes sir", then go off and do our thing. Works out better in the long run.

    Leave a comment:


  • MemphisE34a
    replied
    Originally posted by jmitchell View Post
    On one hand you have your dept policy, the other a constitutional amendment.
    Luckily, this is no longer an issue here. Several years ago the Memphis Fire Administration overruled the US Supreme Court finding many amendments to the Constitution unconstitutional.

    I have learned over the years to make peace with bureaucratic fire department politics.
    This policy would serve me well. I am currently however, more concerned with doing "the right thing", which is rarely what an administrator thinks "is right".
    Last edited by MemphisE34a; 10-23-2010, 11:04 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SkullKrusher2010
    replied
    Originally posted by jmitchell View Post
    About a year ago, the Houston Fire Department banned the use of helmet cams, but not because of safety. They were afraid that some type of substandard performance would be recorded and leaked to the media. You can imagine this got rave reviews around the city and sparked a "freedom of the press" debate. On one hand you have your dept policy, the other a constitutional amendment. There are plenty of arguments that can favor each hand, but not the reason i'm posting this. Just goes to show what can happen when you give someone a desk, pen, and paper. Anything is possible.

    I have learned over the years to make peace with bureaucratic fire department politics. In my time as an officer, I've argued this and that until I was blue in the face but when the day is done, it goes back to respecting your chain of command and enforcing policies weather you like them or not. I'm not much of a "yes man" and will argue about anything with anyone in order to protect my crew but it ends up a bunch of wasted air as the policy will always win. It's unfortunate but fire departments now a days are a business, a public figure business at that, and whether you like it or not you have to play the game.

    So how do we deal with it? We show up, we play the game, and we enjoy doing the thing we've wanted to since childhood. If I can't add something to my helmet then so be it, I still get to wear that awesome piece of equipment. Don't let the rules get you down...adapt and overcome my brothers.
    Those pesky cameras

    I can see the reasoning behind banning the helmet cams. My full-time job is a Correction Officer for the state.. I have seen a camera ruin a man's career MANY TIMES.. for the wrong reasons AND the right reasons.

    At our prison, we had an incident in the yard where the camera picks up the action 9/10's of the way through the incident and it was leaked to CNN and shown to the whole world..The world saw one portion of the footage from the yard.. not what led up to the footage..

    5 officers don't have a job anymore because of that f'n camera footage that does not show the entire story.. 5 excellent officers one day.. 5 unemployed men the next.. Me and my other fellow officers lost big-time over that.. we lost 5 GREAT assets because one f'n camera..

    I also could see a firefighter, in the future, "pushing the envelope" in a bad and unsafe way during an interior attack or whatever because they have a camera on and they want to have bragging rights to the coolest shot to show their friends..and everyone else in the world online.

    There is a thread on here that gives an example of "who's bright idea was it to break out the f'n camera !?!?!?" .. The woman in the car wreck that a firefighter took pictures of and spread it around says it all.. The majority of us would NEVER do that.. but wait long enough and it will happen. It's just the odds playing out.. there is an alien in every group that does something stupid eventually and if cameras/helmet cams are allowed on the fire ground or accident scene, they will eventually capture it.

    I see the banning as an example of damage control before the damage actually happens.. SMART move, I say. It is only a matter of time 'till something damaging gets on the web.. only a matter of time.

    Leave a comment:


  • dmleblanc
    replied
    Originally posted by TruckSixFF View Post
    . I personally am not a huge fan on helmet lights, IMO they tend to blind who ever you look at. .

    I agree. A couple of my captains have those nice LED lights like Blulakr pictured, and it annoys the crap out of me when they come up to me at a scene to talk to me and those bright ***** lights are blazing in my face. And it's like they don't realize how bright those things are, and I have to ask them to turn it off because it's really irritating.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnVBFD
    replied
    I wonder if all these departments with SOP/SOG's on whether or not you can have something on your helmet in the name of "safety", have SOP/SOG's on the duties and responsibilities of the first and second due engines and ladders also.

    Leave a comment:


  • jmitchell
    replied
    About a year ago, the Houston Fire Department banned the use of helmet cams, but not because of safety. They were afraid that some type of substandard performance would be recorded and leaked to the media. You can imagine this got rave reviews around the city and sparked a "freedom of the press" debate. On one hand you have your dept policy, the other a constitutional amendment. There are plenty of arguments that can favor each hand, but not the reason i'm posting this. Just goes to show what can happen when you give someone a desk, pen, and paper. Anything is possible.

    I have learned over the years to make peace with bureaucratic fire department politics. In my time as an officer, I've argued this and that until I was blue in the face but when the day is done, it goes back to respecting your chain of command and enforcing policies weather you like them or not. I'm not much of a "yes man" and will argue about anything with anyone in order to protect my crew but it ends up a bunch of wasted air as the policy will always win. It's unfortunate but fire departments now a days are a business, a public figure business at that, and whether you like it or not you have to play the game.

    So how do we deal with it? We show up, we play the game, and we enjoy doing the thing we've wanted to since childhood. If I can't add something to my helmet then so be it, I still get to wear that awesome piece of equipment. Don't let the rules get you down...adapt and overcome my brothers.

    Leave a comment:


  • TruckSixFF
    replied
    I am sorry but I have to disagree with your Dept's SOG, and that Safety Officers reason for "it is not safe." I do not understand how a rubber band, small helmet light, any type of door wedge on the market, etc. could be a safety issue. Sure I keep a few wedges in my coat pocket, but the I would prefer to first reach up and grab the one off my helmet, before I try to grab one out of my coat. I can see the argument about helmet decals, as some decals out there can be seen as unprofessional. On my job there is no SOG/SOP on this. Tons of guys have helmet rubber bands, wedges, nails, lights, etc. I personally am not a huge fan on helmet lights, IMO they tend to blind who ever you look at. Instead I like the Streamlight Vulcan box light that I keep on my truckman's gut belt, and the Streamlight Survivor on my coat. I have a rubber band on my lid with a few masonry cut nails for keeping doors open, and a wood wedge behind my helmet shield. I have never had any issues with it.

    Leave a comment:

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