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  • Blulakr
    replied
    Originally posted by Squad1LT View Post
    This i think has alot to do with it. He is doing better. I am running out of new ideas to do, but I will probably just keep going over the same things until he gets his confidence up. Was just looking for specific drills that have been used.
    I would stop trying to pressure him to do things fast. At least for now. In fact, MAKE him slow down. Make him don his gear in over 3 minutes so that he has time to think it through and all movements are deliberate, planned and executed properly. If he looks like he's getting flustered, make him stop, take a breath and continue when calm.

    Slow down to go faster. Properly>Quickly.

    My best drills have been when I simulate an actual call as closely as possible. It can be a T\A, fire or medical. Firefighters have no idea what I'm having them respond to until I give them a simulated dispatch. Then they respond exactly as they would in a normal incident except everything is done at half speed. No one runs, hurries or panics. I don't give them advice or directions. Several times during the incident I will radio everyone to stop what they are doing and I will go around and have them explain what they're doing and why. I take notes and we discuss the drill afterwards.

    Hats off to you for taking extra time for a kid that others might give up on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squad1LT
    replied
    Originally posted by Dickey View Post
    Possibly, he wants to do so good and impress the rest of the crew that he can do and prove himself to them, that he is trying too hard.

    This i think has alot to do with it. He is doing better. I am running out of new ideas to do, but I will probably just keep going over the same things until he gets his confidence up. Was just looking for specific drills that have been used.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by dmleblanc View Post
    I know you want to be supportive of the guy, but that might be taking things a bit too far...











    Lack of confidence + over-enthusiasm. I've seen that before. Someone who is trying to make up for a personal shortcoming, real (handicap) or perceived (in this case due to a lousy home life when growing up) who it trying to prove that they really are an asset to society. As mentioned, they try too hard. Besides screwing up, they tend to alienate people with their overly gung-ho attitude.

    Given time, they can become a real asset to the organization. You just have to shepherd them carefully along the way.

    Leave a comment:


  • dmleblanc
    replied
    Originally posted by tree68 View Post
    As has already been suggested, KISS, but do it a lot.
    I know you want to be supportive of the guy, but that might be taking things a bit too far...

    Leave a comment:


  • Dickey
    replied
    I've seen people like this before. It usually means they have a confidence issue with themselves. They know they know it, but when they have to know it, the pressure of having to perform makes them screw it up. This creates a shot of adrenaline in the old gut pile, causing his brain to become mush when he needs it the most. Possibly, he wants to do so good and impress the rest of the crew that he can do and prove himself to them, that he is trying too hard.

    The key to this is the buddy system. Pair him up with someone who will take the time time to build his confidence on small stuff, let this person work with him to show him that he does actually know what needs to be done and how to do it and to show him how to control his emotions. Let him know it's ok to make mistakes, that is how we learn. Also control the criticism too. Making him embarrassed in front of the crew is not a good thing. He probably already feels like people pick on him because if this.

    Maybe some calming techniques to control his breathing and that adrenaline dump would work too.

    Leave a comment:


  • fyrmnk
    replied
    Originally posted by Squad1LT View Post
    I have a proby ff who is having a proble controlling himself when getting worked up. Any kind of pressure gets him going and he cant function well. I have been doing various drills to help him work it out but am running out of drills that apply pressure to someone. Does anyone have any good drills that simulate pressure they use?
    Don't know if it would help in your situation or not, but you might try some kind of entanglement/self rescue drill with his mask blacked out. Stay with him, and as he gets flustered and stops thinking, get ahold of him, have him stop and calm down, and talk him through the problem. Help him find his calm spot, and explain to him that he needs to be able to control his excitement/fear in order to solve issues that he's presented with. Once he gets that foundation, you can work on speeding his decision making while still remaining calm.

    Just some ideas, but it's worth a shot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Easyrider
    replied
    LT is this career or volunteer? Guys maybe able to help you out in either, just with different strategies to account for your training schedule or work schedule.
    PEACE

    Leave a comment:


  • BIKERinBLACK
    replied
    Honestly, find him a buddie that he will feel comfortable running with and have him follow him on calls when possible.

    I was once a go-getter JR who was always in high gear;;; forgetting his helmet in his locker, forgetting to follow the arrow on the hydrant & the all mighty sin of setting/looooooosing a hydrant wrench in the snow

    But as I was getting closer to being 18, I had someone "take me under his wing" and show me the ropes. Once I finished the academy, I started helping out the Jrs. Now after almost 3 years as an active guy, I'm the first one my chief & A-Chief come to for helping with probies and JRs.

    Leave a comment:


  • RFDACM02
    replied
    Originally posted by Squad1LT View Post
    I have a proby ff who is having a proble controlling himself when getting worked up. Any kind of pressure gets him going and he cant function well. I have been doing various drills to help him work it out but am running out of drills that apply pressure to someone. Does anyone have any good drills that simulate pressure they use?
    We had a guy like this. Once the bell hit, he'd get all amped up, couldn't thread a hydrant connection, find his seatbelt receiver, you name it it became difficult to accomplish for him. With time he got slightly better, but by then almost no one felt he'd be safe to work with or around. We seriously worried about him throwing a clot. Luckily he decided to take a less active role after being counselled on the concerns.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    Originally posted by len1582 View Post
    Have him switch to decaf.
    See how many cases of "Red Bull," "Amp," and similar beverages he has in his locker. Take the Mountain Dew out of the soda machine.

    Simple, mostly safe drills with time constraints (donning drills,etc) and lots of "cheering" might help him focus, which is probably his problem. Set a clear goal and push him toward it. If he can get his gear on and on air in 90 seconds with five guys hollaring at him, so much the better. Define clear beginning and end points, as well as the steps needed to arrive there. Work them through before applying stress.

    Consider, too, that "worked up" may be "frustrated."

    As overworked at the term is, ADD and its variations might also deserve consideration.

    As has already been suggested, KISS, but do it a lot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewiston2FF
    replied
    One thought I had was perhaps the better way to be training is to train him until he cant get it wrong. Repetitive training. Build muscle memory. If he can do it without thinking then when he gets worked up it wont matter. That can be done in conjunction with the behavior modification to help him not get so worked up. The problem with the behavior mod is it will take considerable time so while that is going on get him involved in the repetitive training.

    Dont train till you get it right, train till you cant get it wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • firemanguppie
    replied
    l

    I agree with captain easyrider. We have done this with a few guys and it has turned out to be very effective.

    Leave a comment:


  • Captain Easyrider
    replied
    Originally posted by len1582 View Post
    Have him switch to decaf.
    Good one! 7up is caffene free also.

    Lt. have him wear a tank, on air and watch tv. I know it sounds nuts. but bear with me. Time him, then do a ladder or hose stretch evolution, let him get worked up. time him again show him the difference between calm and worked up.

    Now remember it may take time for him to get it. Hey he may even be like some I have had, incapable of original thought but great firemen when told what to do.

    If all else fails, transfer him! (joke)
    PEACE

    Leave a comment:


  • len1582
    replied
    Have him switch to decaf.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squad1LT
    started a topic Training Ideas

    Training Ideas

    I have a proby ff who is having a proble controlling himself when getting worked up. Any kind of pressure gets him going and he cant function well. I have been doing various drills to help him work it out but am running out of drills that apply pressure to someone. Does anyone have any good drills that simulate pressure they use?

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