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  • LVFD301
    replied
    Originally posted by MarcusKspn View Post
    I come from a proud culinary tradition that brings you such gems as "Blood Sausage" and "Head Cheese".

    The way these dishes probably got started was along the line of:

    "We have one cow, one pig, two chickens, a village of 500 people, and 4 months of winter coming up.....how can we make sure this feeds us all winter????"

    The better question would be why some of these "traditional dishes" never stopped?
    Boudin is from the Gods... With tomato? I have traveled 400 miles just to get some before.

    Leave a comment:


  • donethat
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods View Post
    Don't forget Puddin' and Cracklins'...............
    Cracklins are fried pork rinds? Right?
    What is Puddin?

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    That Too........

    Originally posted by donethat View Post
    I get the impression that is what Scrapple is all about. All the pork left overs thrown in with some flour to make use of the scraps. yum yum

    Don't forget Puddin' and Cracklins'...............

    Leave a comment:


  • donethat
    replied
    Originally posted by Acklan View Post
    Same here. We call it red (blood) and white boudin. Use everything but the squeal and oink.
    I get the impression that is what Scrapple is all about. All the pork left overs thrown in with some flour to make use of the scraps. yum yum

    Leave a comment:


  • Acklan
    replied
    Originally posted by MarcusKspn View Post
    I come from a proud culinary tradition that brings you such gems as "Blood Sausage" and "Head Cheese".
    Same here. We call it red (blood) and white boudin. Use everything but the squeal and oink.

    Leave a comment:


  • donethat
    replied
    Originally posted by MarcusKspn View Post
    The way these dishes probably got started was along the line of:

    "We have one cow, one pig, two chickens, a village of 500 people, and 4 months of winter coming up.....how can we make sure this feeds us all winter????"
    I agree. All parts of the animals used to get used. I remember when I was young and going into the store with my mother and looking at the cow tongue and heart, and pig’s brains, knuckles and ham hocks. And tripe. The intestines. All parts of the animal you rarely see in the meat sections of stores now a days.
    My German Grand Mother used to say they used all parts of the pig, even the squeal. Ha ha

    Leave a comment:


  • MarcusKspn
    replied
    Originally posted by donethat View Post
    I saw Lutefish on that show with Andrew Zimmer and the weird food he eats. Even he couldn't stomach only a small bite of Lutefish. Ya gotta wonder how some of these "Traditional Dishes" get started.
    I come from a proud culinary tradition that brings you such gems as "Blood Sausage" and "Head Cheese".

    The way these dishes probably got started was along the line of:

    "We have one cow, one pig, two chickens, a village of 500 people, and 4 months of winter coming up.....how can we make sure this feeds us all winter????"

    The better question would be why some of these "traditional dishes" never stopped?

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Well.............

    Originally posted by snowball View Post
    I giggled when I read this. Somebody please tell me why?


    Because you're easily amused????........................

    Leave a comment:


  • snowball
    replied
    Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
    Good to see ya back cellblock. It's been awhile.
    I giggled when I read this. Somebody please tell me why?

    Leave a comment:


  • LaFireEducator
    replied
    Originally posted by cellblock View Post
    This thread is doing wonders for my diet.
    Good to see ya back cellblock. It's been awhile.

    Leave a comment:


  • cellblock
    replied
    This thread is doing wonders for my diet.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Hmmm............

    Originally posted by ChiefKN View Post
    That is awesome. Shame we didn't have video cameras back then.

    I dunno Ken, Matthew Brady did some experimental work on that back during the Civil War, around the same time Jason was starting Elementary School....... I'll look that up and get back.........

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by donethat View Post
    I saw Lutefish on that show with Andrew Zimmer and the weird food he eats. Even he couldn't stomach only a small bite of Lutefish. Ya gotta wonder how some of these "Traditional Dishes" get started.
    It's " TRADITIONALLY" Unpalatable. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • DeputyChiefGonzo
    replied
    I found this on wikipedia..

    Quote from Garrison Keillor's book Pontoon:
    Lutefisk is cod that has been dried in a lye solution. It looks like the desiccated cadavers of squirrels run over by trucks, but after it is soaked and reconstituted and the lye is washed out and it's cooked, it looks more fish-related, though with lutefisk, the window of success is small. It can be tasty, but the statistics aren’t on your side. It is the hereditary delicacy of Swedes and Norwegians who serve it around the holidays, in memory of their ancestors, who ate it because they were poor. Most lutefisk is not edible by normal people. It is reminiscent of the afterbirth of a dog or the world's largest chunk of phlegm.
    Last edited by DeputyChiefGonzo; 10-30-2010, 09:18 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChiefKN
    replied
    Originally posted by Dickey View Post
    I was forced to try it once when I was little and power puked all over the kitchen table.
    That is awesome. Shame we didn't have video cameras back then.

    Leave a comment:

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