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What is a hose reel bucket????

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  • What is a hose reel bucket????

    What is a hose reel bucket???? I looks like a 5 gallon bucket connected to a metal base?

  • #2
    You put it under a leaky fitting on a hose reel.

    Otherwise, i have no idea.

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    • #3
      hahahaha I like that answer. But I'm sure it's not it. I have a pic but can't load it to here cause it's to big.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by volfireman034 View Post
        What is a hose reel bucket???? I looks like a 5 gallon bucket connected to a metal base?

        My first impression is that you must be the new guy. Did they send you to get a left handed wrench, too? A bucket of steam? A water hammer?
        Chief Dwayne LeBlanc
        Paincourtville Volunteer Fire Department
        Paincourtville, LA

        "I have a dream. It's not a big dream, it's just a little dream. My dream — and I hope you don't find this too crazy — is that I would like the people of this community to feel that if, God forbid, there were a fire, calling the fire department would actually be a wise thing to do. You can't have people, if their houses are burning down, saying, 'Whatever you do, don't call the fire department!' That would be bad."
        — C.D. Bales, "Roxanne"

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        • #5
          http://household-tips.thefuntimesgui..._freecycle.php
          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZdEH...e_gdata_player

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          • #6
            For a brief period in the mid-1020's, some manufacturers offered a round basket for storage of the booster hose, as opposed to the more popular hose reel. If there was an advantage, it would have to have been the lack of moving parts/swivels.

            I didn't find any pictures on-line, but there are several in McCall's "American Fire Engines Since 1900." I base my time frame on when such baskets can be seen in pictures in the book.
            Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

            Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by tree68 View Post
              For a brief period in the mid-1020's, some manufacturers offered a round basket for storage of the booster hose, as opposed to the more popular hose reel. If there was an advantage, it would have to have been the lack of moving parts/swivels.

              I didn't find any pictures on-line, but there are several in McCall's "American Fire Engines Since 1900." I base my time frame on when such baskets can be seen in pictures in the book.
              A.D. 1020.
              This year came King Knute back to England; and there was at Easter a great council at Cirencester, where Alderman Ethelward was outlawed, and Edwy, king of the churls. This year went the king to Assingdon; with Earl Thurkyll, and Archbishop Wulfstan, and other bishops, and also abbots, and many monks with them; and he ordered to be built there a minster of stone and lime, for the souls of the men who were there slain, and gave it to his own priest, whose name was Stigand; and they consecrated the minster at Assingdon. And Ethelnoth the monk, who had been dean at Christ's church, was the same year on the ides of November consecrated Bishop of Christ's church by Archbishop Wulfstan.
              Originally Posted by madden01
              "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

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              • #8
                i am sure it was "1920's".

                yes you see those on alot of soda chemical wagons.
                Originally Posted by madden01
                "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tree68 View Post
                  For a brief period in the mid-1920's, some manufacturers offered a round basket for storage of the booster hose, as opposed to the more popular hose reel. If there was an advantage, it would have to have been the lack of moving parts/swivels.

                  I didn't find any pictures on-line, but there are several in McCall's "American Fire Engines Since 1900." I base my time frame on when such baskets can be seen in pictures in the book.

                  Exactly what it is.
                  Stay Safe and Well Out There....

                  Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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                  • #10
                    Originally Posted by madden01
                    "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally Posted by madden01
                      "and everyone is encouraged to use Plain, Spelled Out English. I thought this was covered in NIMS training."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
                        Exactly what it is.
                        I liked my answer better.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tree68 View Post
                          For a brief period in the mid-1020's,
                          Note to self: Put fingers on diet.
                          Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                          Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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                          • #14
                            http://www.govdeals.com/index.cfm?fa...959&acctID=219


                            this is where I saw the hose buckets.

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                            • #15
                              Looking at that pic I have no idea.

                              They look like a couple of plastic buckets you'd pick up at Home Depot or Lowe's.
                              Train to fight the fires you fight.

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