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  • Quick Attack gear question?

    Just wonder what gear yall have on your quick attack trucks? I'm currently looking to steer ours more towards that (it is basically a light duty rescue now) once the new hazmat unit is in service.

  • #2
    The short answer is "it depends on your area".

    There are many options including brush fire attack only, structural and brush fire attack, fire attack and fire support extrication, and extrication and fire attack.

    The answer is what your department needs and what are the demographics of your community.

    At my full-time combo department, we have one "quick attack". It's actually the oldest truck in our fleet and is housed at our slowest rural volunteer station. It's a 1998 one-ton which carries 300 gallons of water with a stand-alone 250 gpm pump on a basic utility body. We did a slight refurb on it when it was relocated and gave a fresh coat of paint and new lettering.

    It serves as the brush truck for that area of our district, as well as the structural service truck. it carries brush gear, a K-12, a chainsaw, 6 SCBA, 6 spare cylinders, miscellaneous hand tools, a cutting torch, a generator, portable lights and salvage covers. The service equipment is dictated by the LA rating system for service trucks.

    My volunteer department also operates a similar vehicle with similar equipment. However, we have plans to purchase a new brush truck in the very near future, and convert the current vehicle into a rescue and service truck. The tank and pump will be removed and placed on the new brush chassis.
    Last edited by LaFireEducator; 08-08-2010, 01:21 PM.
    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ffemtb722 View Post
      Just wonder what gear yall have on your quick attack trucks? I'm currently looking to steer ours more towards that (it is basically a light duty rescue now) once the new hazmat unit is in service.
      It shouldn't depend on your area. No matter what you respond in, you need to have ALL of your gear with you ALL the time.

      Who cares if it only a grass rig, or only an EMS rig, or whatever? Would you not go on a fire call if it was dispatched on your way back? What if you are on the way back and drive up on something:

      "Yes maam, I am a firefighter and I am in one of our response vehicles, but I left my turnouts at the station because this is an EMS truck."

      Take your stuff with you.
      RK
      cell #901-494-9437

      Management is making sure things are done right. Leadership is doing the right thing. The fire service needs alot more leaders and a lot less managers.

      "Everyone goes home" is the mantra for the pussification of the modern, American fire service.


      Comments made are my own. They do not represent the official position or opinion of the Fire Department or the City for which I am employed. In fact, they are normally exactly the opposite.

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      • #4
        Why are you storing your gear on the truck in the first place?
        Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MemphisE34a View Post
          It shouldn't depend on your area. No matter what you respond in, you need to have ALL of your gear with you ALL the time.

          Who cares if it only a grass rig, or only an EMS rig, or whatever? Would you not go on a fire call if it was dispatched on your way back? What if you are on the way back and drive up on something:

          "Yes maam, I am a firefighter and I am in one of our response vehicles, but I left my turnouts at the station because this is an EMS truck."

          Take your stuff with you.

          I think he is referring to equipment and tools, as well as the general function of the truck, not PPE.

          At least that was the way I interpreted the question.

          And yes, I agree that your PPE should always be on the truck that you are riding on at that moment.
          Train to fight the fires you fight.

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          • #6
            When I first joined, we had a "quick attack" truck (a Dodge Powerwagon with a 300gpm pto and 300 gallons of water. We hauled ***** to the fire with three stuffed in the cab and three riding the tailboard. Then we stood around an waited for the Engine to arrive with all the necessary gear (calm down, that was a little dramatic license...). My point is, the truck was perfect for grass fires. Thankfully, it didn't take long to use it as designed.

            Imo, I don't think there is anything quicker than pulling up with two teams suited and ready, irons and a full booster tank.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by MemphisE34a View Post
              It shouldn't depend on your area. No matter what you respond in, you need to have ALL of your gear with you ALL the time.

              Who cares if it only a grass rig, or only an EMS rig, or whatever? Would you not go on a fire call if it was dispatched on your way back? What if you are on the way back and drive up on something:

              "Yes maam, I am a firefighter and I am in one of our response vehicles, but I left my turnouts at the station because this is an EMS truck."

              Take your stuff with you.
              I can see your point, But.....I guess When i think quick attack( Granted I have been told i speak in NIMS, not English) I Think of Brush unit/Grass rig/Type 6/ Whatever you wanna call it.
              Courage, Being Scared to Death and Saddling Up anyways.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by pvfd27 View Post
                When I first joined, we had a "quick attack" truck (a Dodge Powerwagon with a 300gpm pto and 300 gallons of water. We hauled ***** to the fire with three stuffed in the cab and three riding the tailboard. Then we stood around an waited for the Engine to arrive with all the necessary gear (calm down, that was a little dramatic license...). My point is, the truck was perfect for grass fires. Thankfully, it didn't take long to use it as designed.

                Imo, I don't think there is anything quicker than pulling up with two teams suited and ready, irons and a full booster tank.
                I am personally not a fan a quick attack as first due for a structural response. I prefer a full-engine with at least 750 gallons of water and a full compliment of tools.

                That being said, there are communities that have special circumstances where such a vehicle may be needed. The last department I served on along lake Champlain was just such an area as many of the camps along the shore had roads were simply were not wide enough for a full sized engine during the summer, much rather the winter. While we did not operate a quick attack rig, the neighboring department operated a mini-pumper for just such occupancies. They later developed a manifold truck (no pump/no tank) on a one-ton chassis which carried a full compliment of attack lines, SCBA and tools with 800' of 4" to lay in with.

                Again, to me a quick attack is primarily a brush attack unit or a light rescue designed to handle very small nuisance fires.

                By the way, that truck sounds an awful lot like my college FD's unit - 300 gallons of water and a front-mount pump on an old powerwagon. Those were the days.
                Train to fight the fires you fight.

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                • #9
                  Yes, I was refering to the tools/equipment not ppe, sorry for the confusion. We do have at least 3 and possible many more areas that a "normal" sized pumper is unable to go, and this is usually the first out truck for those areas. And since this truck has more storage capacity than our two brush trucks I thought it would be easier to equip one truck for that purpose than trying to get equipment off one truck and onto this one in a hurry.

                  pictures of the truck can be found here: http://dodgeram.org/rides/04/Elliston_FD/index.html

                  I was thinkin basic structure equipment such as a pike pole, smoke ejector, supply hose Also note the red bags on the back contained scbas but it only has one currently on it

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                  • #10
                    Sounds like a plan.

                    Take a long hard look at the tools and equipment you will need for those structures for initial operations.

                    Would probably think about a couple of irons sets, bolt cutters, a chainsaw, a K-12, a PP Fan and SCBA. Everything else can be lugged in of the larger engines if needed.

                    Would defiantly pack enough supply hose to make it out to the streets for supply.
                    Train to fight the fires you fight.

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                    • #11
                      Around my area we just call them TAC.

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                      • #12
                        We just call them Engine's or Quints as they are fully loaded Class A apparatus.
                        Stay Safe and Well Out There....

                        Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LaFireEducator View Post
                          I am personally not a fan a quick attack as first due for a structural response. I prefer a full-engine with at least 750 gallons of water and a full compliment of tools.
                          Originally posted by CaptOldTimer
                          We just call them Engine's or Quints as they are fully loaded Class A apparatus.
                          As I recall, Syracuse, NY originated the "maxi/mini" concept wherein some companies had both a full sized engine (with a Squrt) and a mini-pumper. "Nuisance" calls got the mini with an officer and a firefighter, pretty much everything else got the big rig. I don't know if and when both trucks went out together, although the early mini's, anyhow, did have a deck gun on them. I think they are still running a form of that, but the "mini's" have gotten a bit bigger.
                          Opinions my own. Standard disclaimers apply.

                          Everyone goes home. Safety begins with you.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tree68 View Post
                            As I recall, Syracuse, NY originated the "maxi/mini" concept wherein some companies had both a full sized engine (with a Squrt) and a mini-pumper. "Nuisance" calls got the mini with an officer and a firefighter, pretty much everything else got the big rig. I don't know if and when both trucks went out together, although the early mini's, anyhow, did have a deck gun on them. I think they are still running a form of that, but the "mini's" have gotten a bit bigger.
                            I think Syracuse is still operating that way but with Midi's and not the mini's once used. We used mini's for maybe 12 years. A real pain, but good for brush, parking decks, trash and wash downs. Now the department is buying Midi's.
                            Stay Safe and Well Out There....

                            Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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                            • #15
                              Quick attacks aka mini pumpers are better built then they were 20-30 years ago. The gvw was 10,000 now you can get a 19,500 in the same sized truck this is makes a big differance in what and how much you can carry. The tools and equipment sould imho be Life saftey first then add as you need. I think one of the most interesting concepts in recent years is the Blanchat Minuteman. A 90% problem solver. The Bigger is better concept is loseing ground with me. With Volunteerism down, cost are up, a truck set like this with a tanker in support could Be what you need on most calls. What if you are a volly house and cant get a quaified engine diver. A Mini could save the day.
                              Last edited by rescueraver; 08-12-2010, 01:46 PM.

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