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Compressor for vehicle brake systems

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  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    Originally posted by Tim1118 View Post
    On-board compressors need to be called out specifically in the spec's, otherwise you will usually just end up with a battery charger. I believe Kussmaul's line is called "Pump & Charge". I've heard good things about them, but have never used one myself. But, converting all of your apparatus to these systems may (read, most likely) will cost much more than the station compressor and respective plumbing to the trucks.

    I do agree with everyone else... not a good idea to use the SCBA compressor to keep the truck charged.

    Ours were spec'd out with onboard compressors. The Quantams need this feature with the cab steps folding up and down with the door being open or closed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Tim1118
    replied
    On-board compressors need to be called out specifically in the spec's, otherwise you will usually just end up with a battery charger. I believe Kussmaul's line is called "Pump & Charge". I've heard good things about them, but have never used one myself. But, converting all of your apparatus to these systems may (read, most likely) will cost much more than the station compressor and respective plumbing to the trucks.

    I do agree with everyone else... not a good idea to use the SCBA compressor to keep the truck charged.

    Leave a comment:


  • rm1524
    replied
    Of the 4 trucks in our station that have air brakes only one has an on board compressor. A 1990, 1998, 2002, 2010.

    Leave a comment:


  • mcwops
    replied
    Originally posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    What about the on board compressor on the apparatus? You have a shore line going into the quick disconnect, it should be able to keep the compressor going to keep the air pressure up on the ride.

    If you are losing air that much where you need to buy a shop compressor to keep the air up, you need to have the truck serviced.
    Our Oshkosh Stryker does not have an onboard electric compressor, only the engine driven one. It doesn't leak down, but in the interest of safety we keep it hooked to air and power quick disconnects.

    On a separate note, do many apparatus actually have onboard compressors? At the department I volunteer with, none of the trucks do and all are hooked to shore air and power.

    Leave a comment:


  • FiremanLyman
    replied
    Originally posted by CaptOldTimer View Post
    What about the on board compressor on the apparatus? You have a shore line going into the quick disconnect, it should be able to keep the compressor going to keep the air pressure up on the ride.

    If you are losing air that much where you need to buy a shop compressor to keep the air up, you need to have the truck serviced.
    Not every Kussmaul system has an air compressor... found that out the hard way.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    What about the on board compressor on the apparatus? You have a shore line going into the quick disconnect, it should be able to keep the compressor going to keep the air pressure up on the ride.

    If you are losing air that much where you need to buy a shop compressor to keep the air up, you need to have the truck serviced.

    Leave a comment:


  • RFDACM02
    replied
    While it seems like none of us really do this, the idea to save money makes sense. I can't see a problem with failing pressure regulators as the individual "fill line" to the service air system would be regulated at the source, then again regulated at the apparatus? The air drying is a problem for us on our service air, likely due to the amount of piping overhead and the build-up of condensation there and at the tank, issues/equipment that our SCBA compressor does not have. It would seem to come to the expense of maintaining SCBA compressor filters if the unit ran far more often. Quarterly/semi-annual air test may require filters be changed more often, but as a previous poster noted, our compressor tech's say ours needs to run often to maximize it's life, not less.

    Leave a comment:


  • mcwops
    replied
    Like I said before, I thought it was a pretty lame idea. I just thought I should see what other stations are doing before dismissing it.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    On the one hand, it makes perfect sense - why have two similar pieces of equipment to maintain when one can do the job?

    At least to someone for whom a compressor is a compressor (like an architect).

    On the other hand, there's all the points that everyone else has made.

    Somehow I just can't justify using grade "D" or "E" air in the tires...

    Leave a comment:


  • MEAN15
    replied
    As a compressor service tech, I also would not reccomend using a breathing air compressor for truck air. I do, however , have a customer who uses his breathing air compressor to supply his Plymovent system as well as his truck air. Been that way for years with no issues.

    I'm not in agreement with the argument of "wearing out the compressor quicker: Compressors will last longer, and be more trouble-free if they are run more frequently, rather than less. One major compressor builder actually required that the machine be run 1 hour per week to maintain warranty coverage. Most machines I see are not run nearly enough. And as far as using up filters - most machines I see hit their 6-month filter life before they exceed their filter hours.

    (One of my customers has a 15-year-old machine with only 60 hours on it)

    Just my 2 cents. If you can afford a breathing air compressor, you should be able to swing a shop compressor.

    Leave a comment:


  • FIREMECH1
    replied
    Extremely bad idea to use a very expensive SCBA compressor for anything else than SCBA bottles. You'll wear it out faster, and maintenance and filters are not cheap.

    I'll also agree with Harve on a possible regulator or other part failure. Bad news if the rig sees 4,500-6,000 psi.

    Good used professional type compressors are pretty easy to come by. But you need to make sure it has a decent mounted cooler and drier system on it. The last thing you need is to add moisture to the tanks and cans, and have them corrode from the inside out, or rust enough to freeze up any parts.

    I've built a drier system for one station using the AD9 and governor that is used directly on the rigs. Desiccant filter is replaced yearly, with no problems.

    FM1

    Leave a comment:


  • mcwops
    replied
    Originally posted by medic190 View Post
    That kind of concerns me about the knowledge of the SCBA compressor manufacturer (if it truly came from there...) I'd consider changing who supplies the SCBA compressor...
    Not sure I should give the name of the manufacturer at this point, but they were one of the top recommended companies (even in several threads in this forum). My thoughts is they wanted us to wear out our compressor quicker so they could hit us on the replacement

    We are spec'ed to get a good quality shop compressor with an air dryer built into the system, to avoid the problems mentioned.

    Leave a comment:


  • chiefengineer11
    replied
    A standard service station type air compressor, with a good filter/dryer is what's in order for airing up tires, maintaining truck system pressures, shop tool air, etc. It might be possible to tap into your SCBA compressor, but that has problems, too. You would have to connect ahead of the filtration system, or put considerably more hours on your filters. I don't know what the SCFM of an SCBA compressor is, but I don't think it's what a service station compressor is. I have to wonder if the system supplier/servicer would be very keen on that one.

    Someone else suggested staying away from el cheapo compressors. I wholeheartedly agree. Been there, done that. However good compressors (and tanks) aren't cheap.

    What we did - we went to a service station equipment dealer and lucked into a used one that had been taken in trade when the shop upgraded to something even bigger. Got a decent price on it, and it's been in our firehouse for going on 15 years now.

    Another idea, keep an eye on newspapers, trade publications, etc. for auctions or sales of places that are closing. Sometimes you can pick up some really good buys there.

    Leave a comment:


  • medic190
    replied
    Originally posted by mcwops View Post
    That was my feeling on the issue as well. This question was posed by the SCBA compressor manufacturer to our architect, who passed it on to me. I just wanted to run the idea up the flagpole and see if anyone would salute it, before I turned it down.
    That kind of concerns me about the knowledge of the SCBA compressor manufacturer (if it truly came from there...) I'd consider changing who supplies the SCBA compressor...

    Leave a comment:


  • firefighterbeau
    replied
    Compressor selection is also key, I wouldn't buy some cheap fly by night compressor, buy something decent that you can get parts for. Down the road it will pay off!

    Leave a comment:

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