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  • whfd930
    replied
    Originally posted by VincentEng2 View Post
    From IFSTA Essentials of Fire Fighting 4th Edition

    Skill Set 12-17 P.461

    1. Connect the first section of hose to the discharge outlet. Do not connect it to the other lengths of hose.
    2. Lay the hose flat in the bed to the front.
    3. Lay the remaining hose out the front of the bed to be loaded later.
    4. Couple the remaining hose sections together.
    5. Attach a nozzle to the male end.
    6. Place the nozzle on top of the first length at the rear.
    7. Angle the hose to the opposite side of the bed and make a fold.
    8. Lay the hose back to the rear.
    9. Make a fold at the rear of the bed.
    10. Angle the hose back to the other side to make a fold at the front.
    11. Continue alternating sides of the bed in the same manner untill the complete length is loaded.
    12. Connect the male coupling of the first section to the female coupling of the last section.
    13. Lay the remainder of the first section in the bed in the same manner.

    The end

    Now yes I have seen some goofy minuteman loads that were place on crosslays that sometimes worked and most of the time didn't. Your system may work for you guys. I stated a "PROPERLY LOADED MINUTEMAN" Per the IFSTA Essentials of firefighting, is designed to be pulled from a rear hose bed in one direction.

    Hope that clarifies the situation.
    IFSTA 4th Edition is obsolete now. They have gone to 5th Edition now and ALOT has changed between the 2. Especially from a trainers mindset on training cadets out of the book.

    Leave a comment:


  • mccookfire36
    replied
    WOW talk about getting guy "fired" up about something. I enjoy good discussion about many topics when folks can keep an open mind, the good and bad to all types. Since we are a combination dept with 8 full time staff supplemented with paid on call folks we can have issues with staffing. Usually our career staff is packed and ready to go when we arrive and are the ones pulling the pre connects while awaiting personnel to arrive and bunker up. We very rarely have long lays from a supply, our dept sog's have us with 250' crosslays of 1.75 on the first outs. I was simply looking for some fresh ideas to try for our cross lays and maybe we will find a flat load will still work for us, but just like discussion on the AFG thread its nice to know things that work and dont work, as well as things to be aware of.

    Thanks for the discussion.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Minuteman is a nice load IF everyone in the outfit trains on it and often. Add the guy who only shows up once in awhile and let me know what you get THEN........Spaghetti. We use Triples after a lot of experimenting. We flatloaded for years before that without much trouble. Try a few loads and see what the personnel can CONSISTANTLY get off the truck without mucking it up.Then train with it and stay with it. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • JohnVBFD
    replied
    I think we should do an economic analysis on the hose loads before any more suggestions as to which is better. Maybe putting the hose in a red flyer wagon is better

    Leave a comment:


  • ccrouse
    replied
    Help With Hoseload

    http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...2095101029391#


    try this video for the minuteman

    Leave a comment:


  • whfd930
    replied
    Originally posted by tree68 View Post
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the "circular" lay which showed up on YouTube with the other video. Interesting concept, but everybody who used it mentioned 125-150 PSI, which would be a tad high if you're running a straight tip. That's the first time I've seen that one.

    We stack our flat load with a couple of pull loops. The first is a couple of layers up, the second about half to two-thirds into the lay (as you're laying it), to be pulled by the person taking the nozzle.
    Actual name for that load is the roundabout and that is what we use. 50' rolled up, grab that and throw it on your shoulder, set it down at the door for interior attack,and spread the middle out, and that way you are only having to deal with 50 ' of line. The 125 psi is used to "inflate" the roll at the door so you can pull into the structure easily. All of our engines are set at 125 psi preset so that is not a big deal for us.

    Leave a comment:


  • VincentEng2
    replied
    Clarification on hose load

    Originally posted by VincentEng2 View Post
    A "PROPERLY" loaded minuteman only allows you one direction of pull.
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    How are you loading your minute man loads? Ours pull from either side with ease.
    From IFSTA Essentials of Fire Fighting 4th Edition

    Skill Set 12-17 P.461

    1. Connect the first section of hose to the discharge outlet. Do not connect it to the other lengths of hose.
    2. Lay the hose flat in the bed to the front.
    3. Lay the remaining hose out the front of the bed to be loaded later.
    4. Couple the remaining hose sections together.
    5. Attach a nozzle to the male end.
    6. Place the nozzle on top of the first length at the rear.
    7. Angle the hose to the opposite side of the bed and make a fold.
    8. Lay the hose back to the rear.
    9. Make a fold at the rear of the bed.
    10. Angle the hose back to the other side to make a fold at the front.
    11. Continue alternating sides of the bed in the same manner untill the complete length is loaded.
    12. Connect the male coupling of the first section to the female coupling of the last section.
    13. Lay the remainder of the first section in the bed in the same manner.

    The end

    Now yes I have seen some goofy minuteman loads that were place on crosslays that sometimes worked and most of the time didn't. Your system may work for you guys. I stated a "PROPERLY LOADED MINUTEMAN" Per the IFSTA Essentials of firefighting, is designed to be pulled from a rear hose bed in one direction.

    Hope that clarifies the situation.

    Leave a comment:


  • GTRider245
    replied
    How are you loading your minute man loads? Ours pull from either side with ease.

    Leave a comment:


  • VincentEng2
    replied
    I think that you just need to test them out and see what works for you. We use the triple load on our 1 3/4 Crosslays as they allow you to pull the load from either direction. A "PROPERLY" loaded minuteman only allows you one direction of pull. Now we do have a 2 1/2 preconnect on the rear of the truck which we do have loaded in a minuteman, for ease of deploying hose up stairwells and around “rat maze” type structures. We keep 100 ft on the shoulder and 100 foot in the truck it’s nice because you only have to drag 100 ft, and the rest you can flake off your shoulder as you make turns.

    Like I said my only suggestion would be to break out the essentials and try the loads for yourself. Just take them slow and steady at first. Crawl before you walk, before you run. The impatient of excited firefighter can screw up a hose pull just as quick as a excited engineer. Every hose load out there can be screwed up due to complacency, and excitement.

    Hope that helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • tree68
    replied
    I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the "circular" lay which showed up on YouTube with the other video. Interesting concept, but everybody who used it mentioned 125-150 PSI, which would be a tad high if you're running a straight tip. That's the first time I've seen that one.

    We stack our flat load with a couple of pull loops. The first is a couple of layers up, the second about half to two-thirds into the lay (as you're laying it), to be pulled by the person taking the nozzle.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    Flat load: face the pump panel/preconnect. Pull the load onto your shoulder while turning away from the panel. the line will deploy nice and easy...

    I swear we make things more difficult than they have to be... work SMARTER, not HARDER!

    Leave a comment:


  • LeatherHed4Life
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    It may take a little time training with the new load, but in the long run it will be worth it. Flat load is an outdated and lazy way of loading hose. This video proves that.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=njrJAOfz0ho
    that was a lame video, and I probably wont be off base in saying no one has come off a truck to fight a fire like that. Even thought the triple lay is nice, you should still take time to flake the hose properly at the door or atleast bring the first coupling so you dont have to advance all 65+ feet of hose or more if your stretching farther. "Rushing " will usually make things longer/harder in the end.

    Take time to make time.

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Is this a preconnected situation or a static bed? Static bed I agree with you.
    The beds that are preconnects usually have 250 ft sometimes 300, so we often find ourselves using it like a static bed even though its preconnected.


    Maybe I'm taking the wrong way, but the attitude that flat loads make spaghetti so we'll just find an easier load seems so wrong. We're suppose to be firemen, we should be able to handle stretching a line. Understaffed places that need 1 guy to easily stretch is one thing, but people screwing up flat loads is entirely different. Lets be good at the basics of firefighting.
    Last edited by nameless; 07-06-2010, 06:38 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    And.......

    Don't reinvent the same old wheel again. Got a Preconnect Discharge? couple a section of Hose to it, and fold it in flat, then continue adding more sections of hose until you have enough. Put a Nozzle on the end, and leave the Nozzle laying on top of the Load. When you need that line, take the nozzle and go. Trust Me, the Hose WILL follow you. The driver checks the bed to be sure it's empty, then charges the line. KISS........

    Leave a comment:


  • GTRider245
    replied
    Originally posted by nameless View Post

    If any "monkey" can deploy a flat load, then why do people whine and complain about it creating spaghetti and being too hard to deploy?.
    Comination of a training issue and laziness. Even the ones who know how to pull it right will often grab the bottom loops and create that pile at the truck. I can't make someone not be lazy, but I can put a load on the truck that even the laziest POS on the department can pull without screwing up.

    Originally posted by nameless View Post
    You are right that it isn't the best fit for one man deployments, but it is a very useful load in urban environments. Especially when you have a larger hose bed and often are breaking the lines down to shorter lengths..
    Is this a preconnected situation or a static bed? Static bed I agree with you.

    Leave a comment:

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