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what knives/tools do you use?

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  • Ack8236
    replied
    I have a leatherman on my belt, but I carry a folding knife in my pocket, one in my gear pocket (S&W with screwdriver tip and window punch) and one on my escape belt. I use the knives WAY more than my leatherman. For batteries I carry a small 5/16 rachet tool, very little room and weight and works fast.
    This is the knife I carry in my pocket, cost about $9 dollars at the local Gilroy's Hardware store.

    Last edited by Ack8236; 07-10-2010, 11:38 PM. Reason: Added picture

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  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Not to be a smart*****, but would it be that much harder to just carry in the tool box off the rig if you run a call where you may need tools?
    Sure, I'll carry the 10 pound tool box along with my regular load of the 6 foot new york hook, a pickhead axe and the can...come on be serious. Most of the time with an alarm call you haven't a damn clue what is really going on when you head in til you get there.

    I am not saying you should carry what I do, that is your business. But I will continue with my assortment until retirement day.

    The one tool I forgot to mention the other day was a Fiskars multi-snip cutters. Tough little tool cuts through most anything with ease.

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  • Chenzo
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Not to be a smart*****, but would it be that much harder to just carry in the tool box off the rig if you run a call where you may need tools?

    Would you rather carry a few extra tools in your pocket, or lug a toolbox around everywhere you go? For me, the choice is simple. I'll take the extra pound of weight in my gear to avoid having to carry or have another guy carry a tool box on every call where tools may be necessary.

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  • mrpita
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Not to be a smart*****, but would it be that much harder to just carry in the tool box off the rig if you run a call where you may need tools?
    So then, we need to start carrying a toolbox on every call. Some of our calls you can't even see the incident floor from the piece (had one today on the 51st), let alone know what's going on up there. Other calls as mentioned, I might be walking a long way - I can start at one end of my local and walk to the other end underground, not counting the subways and rail tunnels. Or we might have to walk to the sub-basement of the sub-basement's sub-basement. Oh wait, I (and the rest of my crew each) do carry a "toolbox".

    I have my knives, Channellock tool, my multi-tool, and I carry a 4-in-1 screwdriver, aviation snips and vise-grip. I also usually have a folding hex-key kit and a few of the more common alarm system keys, for resetting pull stations. Not to mention the wedges, webbing and flashlights. Biggest problem I have is forgetting to bring the best tool - up on my shoulders. My guys may not carry the same stuff as I, but they all carry some basics; some overlaps, some is unique.

    Some of the stuff is life-safety. Some is for convenience, some is for comfort (earplugs). None is carried for no reason.

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  • GTRider245
    replied
    Not to be a smart*****, but would it be that much harder to just carry in the tool box off the rig if you run a call where you may need tools?

    Leave a comment:


  • FyredUp
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Rule of thumb for what tools to carry: if it is essential to life safety, carry it. Wire cutters, flashlights, etc. would be good ideas.

    If you can send someone back to the truck to get it becuase if you were to use it it wouldn't be for life safety anyway, leave it on the truck. Guys make themselves into walking tool boxes for no reason what so ever.
    Sorry, I disagree. We have huge complexes that cover multiple blocks, as well as being multiple stories. It isn't so simple to say Hey numbnuts, go get me a screwdriver. It may be a 15 minute trip out and back.

    I remember guys snickering about the few tools i carry until we were in the basement of a home investigating a gas leak and we needed to hut off the gas, inside meter, I had my linesmans pliers and voila! we shut off the gas. I can't begin to tell you how many times we have disassembled things witht the tools I carry.

    I say the rule of thumb is carry what you use, or what may save your life, and get rid of the other stuff.

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  • ChiefSquirrel
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Rule of thumb for what tools to carry: if it is essential to life safety, carry it. Wire cutters, flashlights, etc. would be good ideas.

    If you can send someone back to the truck to get it becuase if you were to use it it wouldn't be for life safety anyway, leave it on the truck. Guys make themselves into walking tool boxes for no reason what so ever.
    That's well said. I carry a pair of linesman pliers / wire cutters and some 1 inch wedding tied into a large loop in my turnout pants pockets at all times. All the other stuff (window punch, glasses, seatbelt cutter, shove knife, regular knife, multi-tool, extrication gloves, goggles, lock pick, trauma shears) I keep in a small tool bag that goes on the truck when shift starts and comes off with my gear when shift ends. If I think I'll need it, I put it in my pocket but I don't look like a walking hardware store all the time!

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  • GTRider245
    replied
    Rule of thumb for what tools to carry: if it is essential to life safety, carry it. Wire cutters, flashlights, etc. would be good ideas.

    If you can send someone back to the truck to get it becuase if you were to use it it wouldn't be for life safety anyway, leave it on the truck. Guys make themselves into walking tool boxes for no reason what so ever.

    Leave a comment:


  • rescueraver
    replied
    I just gave away my ResQrench to one of the new guys. I have stoped useing it since I have the Channellock Rescuetool. I never trusted it strengh for prying. It is a good folding spanner with some nice features like the protected window punch the intergrated seat belt cutter.
    As for laminate glass you still need to get through the plastic. This requires either chopping or sawing. I have seen some knives that have a window saw,I never felt they were worth the money, not that they were good tools.I seen a guy break the blade at the hinge pin, I finshed the windshield with.... the channellock rescue tool by chopping. btw he now has the channellock rescue tool. I dont own stock in Channellock, but I will tell everyone about it when I feel that a product is very good and when a fellow firefighter designed this tool he did a great job. A tip of ye ole leather to him

    Leave a comment:


  • trauma308
    replied
    Originally posted by castortroy123 View Post
    some of these tools like the ResQRench and resqme have this metal tip for shattering car windows?
    does it really shatter laminated car windows?
    anyone tried doing it?
    I used the window punch on my ResQRench only once on a car window, and it worked pretty well. It was the driver's side window of a little Opal, and I hit the punch right at the front of the window, and about the front third of the window shattered in from my arm following it. This happened in Iraq, after I'd left the fire service temporarily to become a Marine Infantryman, so I cleared the rest of the glass with my rifle barrel. Turns out the guy we pulled through the window (because he locked the door on us and wouldn't come out) was the one who tried to blow us up a few days before. I found the ResQRench to be a good tool for my cargo pocket on patrols, obviously for the window punch, but the pry tool capability came in handy more than a few times.

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  • castortroy123
    replied
    thanks for the Channellock tool idea.
    it looks nice.
    one more thing.
    some of these tools like the ResQRench and resqme have this metal tip for shattering car windows?
    does it really shatter laminated car windows?
    anyone tried doing it?

    Leave a comment:


  • rescueraver
    replied
    I have the 88. Cuting car battery cables require a few cuts. For me haveing the pliers offer more versitility, the cable cutter head is a single use design. I was able to take out a side window in a car and pull up the broken off push style lock and open the car door.

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  • larry302
    replied
    As far as knives go.... Lets just say i'm a knife guy I have knives that cost more then some guys cars..... I have been in Blade Mag. interviewed about knives for FF and wrote one piece for Tactical Gear.

    For a bread and butter folder Spyderco is very good look at the Endura and Delica.

    That Gerber folder is a design by a custom maker and FF named Rick Hinderer . I have one of his customs XM-18. He has not taken orders for that knife ( custom) in over 1 1/2 years now... to back logged.

    With knives you get what you pay for. In production knives Spyderco, Kersaw, Benchmade CRKT are some of the good ones. Now they also offer different levels with in these brands fyi .

    I gave up on multi-tools on the job , but if they work for others cool. I found that by the time I got it out unfolded etc. Someone else just pulled out a channel lock or screw driver.... I also prefer full sized ones in my bunkers.

    Good Luck.

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  • trauma308
    replied
    I've always had an old-school original Leatherman, and I later bought a ResQRench. It worked pretty well, though I didn't really ever use it much, mostly just the pry bar and seat belt cutter. I kept in my turnout pants the tools I might likely use when I'd have my SCBA on. In my coat was my folding utility knife and eye pro.

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  • bigrig77
    replied
    I am gonna say that a leatherman is the way to go. While these big name knives do work, stuff falls out of your pocket all the time. Plus weight reduction is the name of the game. If you are carrying a handful of tools that is gonna at weight and size to your gear. That stuff could be replaced with one tool, and you will reduce your profile and gear weight. I know that this stuff is not going to add 10 lbs but that stuff still has weight.

    Tool placement is also key. A lot of people put stuff in there pockets when they have not SCBA on then when you need it, it is covered and hard to get too.

    Leave a comment:

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