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Traditional Doors vs Roll Up Doors

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  • #16
    Have to agree with some of these posts. The traditional doors always open, don't have the jamming worry and are sturdier. You also have to take into account where you live. If you live in a cold climate, water can get in the tracks and freeze the door shut also add in road salt and sand and all those moving parts can become corroded without proper attention. Also like everyone else said they jam very easy with the slightest pressure.
    "I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a fireman. The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we know the work which a fireman has to do believe that his is a noble calling."

    Edward F. Croker
    Chief 1899-1911
    Fire Dept. City of New York

    HOOK N' CAN of the I.A.C.O.J.

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    • #17
      As background, my department has been running roll-up doors since 1976. Currently, four of our six pieces of apparatus utilize them exclusively or in conjunction with traditional doors. One 1978 truck we inherited doesn't have them, nor the 1997 Quick attack which just didn't have the space to justify them.

      No, soap & water does not get caught in the tracks. Maybe a bit of water you use to rinse the soap off with. Besides, they're aluminium -- what is a bit of water drying in station gonna do to them?

      No, they don't freeze shut in cold weather. Well, I suppose if you coat a couple inches of ice on a truck they won't work, but neither will traditional doors.

      I've had equipment jam a door. Never for an hour though! Usually a good THWACK of the hand will jiggle it enough for the door to raise. On the subject of equipment jamming the door -- WHY WASN'T IT STORED PROPERLY? A piece of equipment heavy enough to jam the door enough that a quick whack of the hand doesn't clear it is also heavy enough to break your toes if you open an traditional door and it finishes rolling out of the compartment like it was trying to do.

      Doors should not be used to hold equipment in -- that's what lips, straps, and mounting brackets are for.

      Like some have said, they do take 6-12" at the tops of the compartments. For us, that really wasn't a concern as most of the doors ended up with the bottom of the roll-up storage area about 6-1/2' high -- above the level you'd store equipment in compartments in. This issue is a bigger concern if you use "low-side" compartments or possibly even if you have fairly small engines that you'd have to make higher to accomodate the doors without losing space. (One caveat, Hackney "beverage" style trucks don't have the space issue -- the doors go up flat against the roof)

      I like 'em. You can see what's in an adjoining compartment without stepping back once the truck is open. We frequently work in tight driveways, were sometimes trees are close enough to prevent the opening of a traditional compartment -- still enough room to get the equipment out if you could've opened the door though! They don't pop open into opposing lanes of traffic (seen that, scared the #$%^ out of me, still can't believe the cars swerved in time to avoid it!). If running tankers down a tight road by your scene, it gives them a couple extra feet of space. If your working an accident on narrow roads, it gives you a bigger margin of safety of not having to step around the doors (even if the only traffic is police cruisers and ambulances).
      IACOJ Canine Officer
      20/50

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