Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

RIT Pack Accessories

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • RIT Pack Accessories

    Less the TIC and SCBA, what equipment do you carry in your RIT Pack? I know that several of the SCBA manufacturers produce RIT packs, and I am particularly interested in the one made by SCOTT, however I haven't seen it advertised lately. Any info on that would also be appreciated.
    Take care, stay safe, & stay low!

    Lt.

  • #2
    Rather than buy a RIT pack, we made ours.

    Our RIT pack consists of the SCBA bottle, the regulator assembly, 100' of rescue rope, a nylon bag of assorted wooded chocks, 50' of webbing, a few carabiners, and an extra mask. This is all carried in a “D” cylinder sized EMS bag, modified with stronger shoulder straps, strategically placed holes for the regulator, and reflective lettering to identify the kit.

    Also consider adding a tool kit to the pack, including flat/Phillips screwdrivers, a pair of wire cutters, and a pair of pliers. You can get these at any local hardware store in a pack for < $15.00
    "Honor Above Thyself"

    Patrick Harper

    NOTE: THE VIEWS EXPRESSED BY ME IN THIS FORUM DO NOT REFLECT THE VIEWS OF MY EMPLOYER.

    Comment


    • #3
      go to www.scottaviation.com and you can get literature on the RIT pak. We have one and its really great. The pak has a single phase compressor and has either a regulator or quick connect end on it and you can just hook up really easy. I think it works awesome.

      Comment


      • #4
        Check out www.fire-rescueoutfitters.com, click on to rapid interverention page, 2nd page has an RIT bag that holds a spare SCBA,
        TIC, ropes, webbing, hand tools & more.

        Comment


        • #5
          Instead of wasting money on a worthless piece of equipment like an scba rit pack concentrate on better saws, lifelines, flash lights, thermals, and lighter hand tools. And lets not forget about training spend the money on training!!!!!! The time wasted trying to hook up the rit pack could be spent out in the front yard with the fire fighter your trying to rescue. Lets look at an example... rit stays out of the house until needed right??? So all rit members should have a full tank right??? Most of the packs made in the last 10 years have buddy breathing attachments right???? So your rit scba pack is on your back. Its not rocket science.
          YES I AM A PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTER AND YES I AM IN THE UNION

          Comment


          • #6
            I agree with firemonkey70 with the money being put toward training because the equipment means nothing if you don't have the knowledge in how to use them. I have gone through the NYS RIT team training once and have wanted to take the course again for the longest time. The idea of a RIT team is to get in and get out as fast as possiable. That is the whole idea behind having this team. Its nice to have all the toys to play with but we have to remember...keep it simple. The more simple the less likly you are to screw things up and in this line of work mistakes cost lives.

            Stay safe and hope this helped in some way.

            Comment


            • #7
              THANK YOU northhfd068
              YES I AM A PROFESSIONAL FIRE FIGHTER AND YES I AM IN THE UNION

              Comment


              • #8
                There have been several well documented cases where firefighters have died during the rescue attempt due to running out of air. Not planning for continuing a downed FF's air supply is negligent at the least. I agree the "RIT" pack is expensive, we use a spare SCBA with a buddy breather and an extra mask that we slide into a rope bag. We also have the luxury of all local departments using only Scott masks. The Scott RIT pack gives you a single stage regulator, longer air hose with a buddy breather and/or standard mask regulator for about 1800 bucks. I'd also say that as an instructor I get to see quite a few departments SCBA every year and the vast majority in this area DON'T come through with buddy breathers (available, but not ordered). Air is the problem in so many cases, don't neglect it. Make your training realistic and keep track of how long it really takes to get a firefighter out, then do some scenarios where the lost FF decides to call for help after his low pressure alarm goes off and see how much time you have. One question for those planning on using their own buddy breather connections.. how much time do you get out of a 30 minute cylinder? How much time can 2 firefighters (one panicked and one dragging him) get out of a 30 minute cylinder? Hope you have another RIT.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I am currently in the middle of training my department for a RIT Team. I downloaded a powerpoint presention regarding the AWARE procedure. It teaches along with other things that the spare SCBA tank is needed in case you have to leave the downed firefighter for reasons such as you running out of air or needing an extended period of time to perform the rescue. I agree that to some departments such as my own that money is an issue and making your own sometimes is better then buying one already made.

                  In case you are interested i downloaded the presention from http://tcffa.org/download.shtml website. Hopes this helps in some sort of way.
                  NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
                  IACOJ Attack

                  Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Unfortunately this type of opinion (firemonkey)is expressed all to often regarding specialized tactics for Rapid Intervention. To believe that a member of a RIT does not need to be trained to a proficient level in the techniques of an emergency SCBA rescue pack changeover are actually quite frightening. I tend to specialize my teaching towards firefighter entrapment within a burning building as I feel that this will be the most difficult and challenging aspect of the RIT operation along with removal. When the initial RIT deploys on the mayday into a burning structure and enters the rescue room only to discover the downed firefighter pinned by debris or heavy objects with only 100 psi of air left in their SCBA and are looking at a 10 to 30 minute (or more) extrication, someone is going to die. All RIT's MUST train and deploy with SCBA rescue packs and be able to perform smooth changeovers with this life sustaining operation. The use of a RIT bag is also an inexpensive, and useful, tool for a Rapid Intervention Team. I mean no offense towards firemonkeys opinion, as I respect all opinions, but I truely believe that with some education on this subject and some hardcore RIT training, this opinion could be influenced. Trust me, I have lived a multiple firefighter fatality fire, and I would never teach something that I feel would not someday be used during a firefighter rescue. Please, continue to train with SCBA rescue packs and changeovers, you just might someday save a firefighters life.....

                    Jim Crawford
                    Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire
                    James K. Crawford
                    Assistant Fire Chief
                    Midway Fire Rescue
                    Pawleys Island, SC

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I agree with PBFTRK33 on this one. We have begun our basic RIT awareness training, and a primary point in the training is conveting the harness of our airpacks, so they will not be pulled off during extrication from the building. We also train in the methods of securing an air supply for the downed firefighter. Unless the firefighter went down immediately after entry, chances are that he will be low on air. A simple set up that we are making is a medium sized bag containing a Scott pak with the straps removed. All that is required is for us is to do is remove the downed firefighters regulator and place the spare on. Rope is also proveided in the bag to use as tag lines or to secure the pack to the downed firefighter for removal.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I'm with Jim on this one!Using a buddy breathe commits 1 pack and 2 people to 1 spot.Usually RIT is activated for why?BECAUSE A FF IS IN DEEP S**T.Spare air is not a luxury it's a necessity.The AVERAGE FF gets 1 minute per 100# air under normal conditions assuming a reasonably fit individual.Add the stress and physical effort involved in removing a downed FF and guess what? NO BUDDY BREATHING on my Intervention team thank you very much.TAKE THE SPARE with you,it's a tool.Not every extraction is a ten minute job,plan for the worst.On a Side Jim you going the 18th?T.C.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I'm not opposed to buddy breathing. It adds another survival tool. I am against making buddy breathing your PLAN for firefighter rescue. We are standing by to go get a firefighter, PLAN for him to be out of air, PLAN for his survival.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I for one am in favor of such a pack. It does not need to be factory made. An older air pack can be converted rather easily. There are other things to consider when you talk about RIT packs. What happens when the downed firefighter has a cracked or broken mask? How about when a line on thier air pack is cut? What if you can't get to the buddy breather connection?
                            How big is your bottle? A one hour bottle hooked to a downed firefighter while you are working will provide about 15 to 20 minutes of air. I know, we have trained and tested this procedure. That is OK if you know you can get them out in that time. What if you can't get them out in that time? Are you going to hook someone else to the downed firefighter? These are all things that could and will happen if you don't plan and train for them.
                            We have members of my department that have the opinion that we have never needed such an item for 75 years, why do we need them now? We have change the way we operate and fight fires over the last 75 years. It is time we caught up with the times and started to look out for our brothers.
                            You need a plan, need to train, need to have the equipment to do the job. Anything less will get you or someone else killed.

                            Just do what you know is right, and you can't go wrong.

                            Be safe, and never forget our fallen brothers.


                            CFDGURU4U

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              A few years ago when all this RIT stuff started I was on a busy engine with a great officer who had a natural ability to see throught the smoke and make good sense. At the time our RIT gear consisted of a haligan, a flat head axe, a little giant ladder, and a 75 foot handi line. The first thing he said was "What about some air?". When ever we got assigned RIT we grabbed an air pack and face piece from the pumping engine's driver. Two years later, the dept comes out with the RIT bag. Contents = One SCBA, One face piece, One buddy hose.
                              I also carry a chem light in my left coat pocket and a roll of tape. If we run outta air ourselves I intend to mark the victim before I leave, or myself if it is me. Saw that in Fire Engineering a few years ago.

                              All I need is the air that I breathe...
                              See You At The Big One

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X