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  • CHIEF 161
    Guest replied
    CONTACT THE ABBET RIT ORGANIZATION THIS MAY HELP YOU WEB SITE IS
    MEMBERS.HOME.NET/ABBETRIT,/INDEXHTML


    DAVE VANATTA
    MIDDLESEX TWP CHIEF

    ------------------
    DAVID S VAN ATTA

    Leave a comment:


  • 86Rescuetech
    Guest replied
    Our team runs a Heavy Rescue with the full complement of tools. We have 8-9 firefighters and here is the assignment. One OIC to oversee op's from the outside. Two FF's ready to go one off the truck with a TIC, radio, lights, and rope. Other one with irons and rope. Two more as back-up with radio, lights, saw, rope, MSA buddy breather, and irons. Two outside team members to set up staging area and obtain water, ladders, and whatever else may be needed. Two more are optional as gophers. Once our team is in service, we have a cover up FAST team dispatched. Hope this helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • Truckie5553
    Guest replied
    Im not trying to point fingers here, but you really need to do some checking into what a RIT function truly is. A RIT is not to enter into any IDLH atmospheres at anytime unless there is danger or someone is in trouble. At this time, the RIT is launched and another 2 members must replace this team as a new RIT to satisfy 2in-2out. With doing what you are speaking of, you never meet your 2-out as you have all of your crews working inside. I hope this information helps you and if you have any other questions feel free to contact me.

    Originally posted by blitzline:
    RIT teams on our department are pre-determined at the scene of working fires or incidents in which a hazard presents. They are split into three groups (usually two to a group): One group is for search and extrication of victim(s), one for air and one for breaching if necessary (collapses). They can perform all functions as one team or as specialized. The possibilities are endless, three groups of two, etc. We use Draeger airpacks with the buddy breathing attachment as standard for all personnel, not just for RIT. Irons, spare pack, lights (of course), and search ropes are the usual tools we will enter with, we leave the heavy duty stuff available on a tarp designated for RIT use, such as k-saws, cutters, sledgehammers and the like. A crew of two can always back out to retrieve those tools, to which they will become the "breaching team". A fourth team could even enter a RIT situation as a line crew protecting the extrication team, if the room allows. Mix and match, as IC you already know never commit to one way of doing anything. It is up to him / her to make sure they are made available, we feel the secret is availability and that the team has done its job setting up. In our area, we are committed to the 2 in 2 out rule.

    Oh, and on a side note, your next mutual aid company may be volunteer. Although I am working toward a career position, I get a sour taste when I hear or see "I'm a PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTER". Don't confuse "professional" with "permanent". At least where I come from, the professionals are volunteer and are usually more so the the permanents. What ever happened to the comradery of FF? Is that only reserved for career? Don't worry, I got your back brother, even if your a volunteer.


    PROUD, VOLUNTEER, COMMITTED


    ------------------
    Captain James Collier
    McMahan Fire Rescue
    KCTCS Area 6 Instructor

    Leave a comment:


  • Truckie5553
    Guest replied
    This is in reply to Pat Dunns reply!!!!!!!!!***One thing to be careful with here is when you said that you could use the app. operator and the IC as you 2 needed for 2in 2 out. This is not true. I did some research on this and found that the only way a person can be considered for RIT is they must be in full PPE including SCBA and not be involved in any other duty on the fire scene. This takes the IC and app. operator out due to this. The IC is in charge of the scene and therefore can not make entry into the structure and the app. operator is dutied to the engine for water operations. Be careful when trying to find loop holes, we thought this would work as well but found out it would not.****

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  • HHoffman
    Guest replied
    Check out the web site www.the-reed.com
    It is a great tool, we use it and love it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skidz
    Guest replied
    To all those visits to my post,

    I would like the chance to excuse blitzline's post. I have emailed his firehouse.com email in reference to his ending statement.

    I would like you all to know that I do not appreciate any career or volunteer bashing in any of my posts. You can do that elsewhere. I was a volunteer and I very proud of that now I am career and I am proud of that accomplishment in my life. I do not bash volunteers or career firefighters; I bash the idiots out there who tear the systems apart with the volunteer/career ****ing matches.

    Again, Thank you all for responding to my post.

    SKIDZZ


    ------------------
    PROUD, PROFESSIONAL, PROGRESSIVE


    Member IAFF Local 1664
    [email protected]

    Leave a comment:


  • Nate Marshall
    Guest replied
    2 departments you want to contact would be the Aurora and West Metro Fire Deapartments In Colorado. Both use their heavy rescue units as RITS. Captain and 4 firefighters.
    Aurora Heavy Rescue and West Metro Rescue 10 respond to all fires and that is their sole job, fireground safety and RIT. West Metro also has a captain who is the SAM officer, SAM stands for Safety and Medical.

    Leave a comment:


  • blitzline
    Guest replied
    RIT teams on our department are pre-determined at the scene of working fires or incidents in which a hazard presents. They are split into three groups (usually two to a group): One group is for search and extrication of victim(s), one for air and one for breaching if necessary (collapses). They can perform all functions as one team or as specialized. The possibilities are endless, three groups of two, etc. We use Draeger airpacks with the buddy breathing attachment as standard for all personnel, not just for RIT. Irons, spare pack, lights (of course), and search ropes are the usual tools we will enter with, we leave the heavy duty stuff available on a tarp designated for RIT use, such as k-saws, cutters, sledgehammers and the like. A crew of two can always back out to retrieve those tools, to which they will become the "breaching team". A fourth team could even enter a RIT situation as a line crew protecting the extrication team, if the room allows. Mix and match, as IC you already know never commit to one way of doing anything. It is up to him / her to make sure they are made available, we feel the secret is availability and that the team has done its job setting up. In our area, we are committed to the 2 in 2 out rule.

    Oh, and on a side note, your next mutual aid company may be volunteer. Although I am working toward a career position, I get a sour taste when I hear or see "I'm a PROFESSIONAL FIREFIGHTER". Don't confuse "professional" with "permanent". At least where I come from, the professionals are volunteer and are usually more so the the permanents. What ever happened to the comradery of FF? Is that only reserved for career? Don't worry, I got your back brother, even if your a volunteer.


    PROUD, VOLUNTEER, COMMITTED

    Leave a comment:


  • Scene25
    Guest replied
    As soon as our tones drop for a reported structure fire, 2 neiboring fire departments are automatically dispatched for RIT.

    We train on a regular basis with these departments, so they know what we expect from them, and they know what to expect from us.

    I went on a RIT call last evening in a neiboring community, along with another RIT Team. The other team was then requested for ventilation due to limited manpower on their end, so from there, we were the primary RIT. We had 6 firefighters, which included myself, our 1st asst, and our RIT officer, as well as 2 firefighters. All of us are trained in various aspects of RIT, including firefighter survival, RIT exercises, FF1, etc.

    Our equipment includes: Stokes loaded with 2 RIT air packs, TIC, rope, AED, numerous hand tools, saw, lights. Depending on the nature of the fire/building and what all is involved, we wil lsometimes have airbags, cribbing out on the tarp, immediately available if needed.

    All in all, our calls have been running pretty good with the exception of the RIT team getting more involved with the firefighting because of manpower issues.

    I am a firm believer that if you are on the RIT, you do nothing but standby. A tired, drained RIT member is not going to do the RIT anygood if that need would arise.

    As always, Take Care and Be Safe.

    My department SOP's are available for those who are interested, and alot of the procedures we inherited came from James Crawford, who developed RIT, and is a firefighter with Trk Co 33 Pittsburgh Bureau of Fire. Some of the procedures had to be changed in a minor way, as Pittsburgh has all the resources available, and we dont.



    ------------------
    John Williams
    NRFF1/EMT

    Leave a comment:


  • Skidz
    Guest replied
    To everyone,

    Thank you so much for you replies. They mean a lot to me. I appreciate you taking your time to tell me how you do things at home.

    I would like to leave you with one comment.

    No matter how you choose to interpret the law remember a couple things. Always use-dedicated people to do the job of RIT. Do not use pump operators, ICO, PIO, or other individuals. You need to use people who are committed to saving you when the **** hits the fan. Well, I should not use committed, we are all committed to saving lives. I will use focused and dedicated to the overall safety of the firefighters on the fire ground.

    No matter what! From the start to finish always, always, always have a RIT. If you have life safety issues take care of them but get a RIT established A.S.A.P. They are there for you.

    I know I just rambled on about what seems to be nothing but, somewhere in this post is some meaning I hope you find what I mean.


    Take Care and Be Safe,

    SKIDZZ


    ------------------
    PROUD, PROFESSIONAL, PROGRESSIVE


    Member IAFF Local 1664
    [email protected]

    Leave a comment:


  • S. Cheatham
    Guest replied
    PatDunn,
    I am not positive, but doesn't the part of the law say that 2 in 2 out is only for the initial stage. I am pretty sure we wrote our SOPs from the law and I believe it goes on to say that whenever there is more than one team operating or assigned in an IDLH environment, the incident shall no longer be considered in the initial stage and at least one dedicated RIT shall be established. The argument would then be what constitutes a "dedicated" RIT team. Can the IC and pump operator be a part of this. It is very vague!

    Leave a comment:


  • PatDunn
    Guest replied
    JP I agree however That is what the Regulation says. just translating what the actual law says

    Leave a comment:


  • jpchev
    Guest replied
    There are a lot of good ideas here, in my station we stage a FAST or RIT team but as of this time we do not have a written guide as to how it operates, yet.
    Ref: PatDunn would you really want your IC and attack pumper chauffer to be a RIT? When things start to go downhill I would like to think that someone is running the operation and someone is making sure the water is still flowing, especially if I was on the inside. This is not a criticism, just an observation, I realize that we have to do the best we can with our given resouces.
    Keep the information flowing
    John C Captain Hope-Jackson Fire

    Leave a comment:


  • LadderCapp
    Guest replied
    I'm with a career dept. so staffing is not an issue, but we do it like this. We have an extra pumper dispatched to every regular alarm strictly for RIT operations. That crew, whether 3 or 4 persons, (we won't run an apparatus with less than 3) will set up for RIT. They have a dry line, spare air pack, Imaging camera, forcible entry, and rope bag. They are at all times in verbal range of command to avoid having radio problems when everyone gets wound up. All the IC has to do is say "fetch,and give an indication of the last known location" This is accomplished by all our radio designators on scenes are task and location oriented, ie... fire attack second floor, Search team 1st floor. The RIT-or RIC whichever you use, should NEVER, NEVER be used to line up fans, and other equipment to be used by suppression crews. They are not gophers, they are an intervention safety crew.

    Leave a comment:


  • PatDunn
    Guest replied
    The way the OSHA Respratory protection standard reads, is as follows. Any time personnel enter an IDLH enviroment there must be at least 2 personnel ready for rapid intervention, The pump operator and IC can be the rit members if need be to satisfy the law. as far as tools the standard does not say, but dont load your self up with to much equipment, if deployed youll need all the energy and dexterity possible. also a writ team is not required by law if enterance is made because of an immediate rescue demand. I hope this helps ya out

    Leave a comment:

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