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Rapid Intervention Training

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  • #16
    Looks like it will work fine on a conscious firefighter standing there.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

    Comment


    • #17
      As you all know, RIT, or FAST has been around since the 70's, it isnt until recently we adopted this procedure in north america and put some form of formality to it.
      First, I would say for training, use the internet and publications like firehouse, they have excellent RIT procedures and training tips you can follow, Second, use local resources training ideas, especially larger departments, they dont follow, they re-invent.

      FAST or RIT should be proactive, never reactive!
      Proactive approaches like educating, training (radio use and entanglement recovery etc), identifying and recognizing potential problems through company inspections of local hazardous buildings, firefighter alertness and self rescuing, self preservation when trapped etc are all keys to successful RIT.

      Having identified RIT teams and allowing them training time is a great thing on a shift too, dont just put the lazy or unmotivated guys on the rescue rigs, put the go getters, who are keen in their jobs because inevitably, they may be the RIT team. Dont deploy RIT on the bulding entrance and "wait for trouble", get themcloser and use them.

      Advice I have is to stop thinking RIT, Think FAST, and deploy them closer or "on deck" to the fire crews. RIT should be working, doing medial tasks closer the attack or ventilation crews at highest risk, sitting outside isnt going to help the crews at risk on the third floor if it all goes bad. A well trained firefighter will not get into a bad situation knowing he will risk others to do so, Mayday should be called before you get into a no win situation, tell your firefighters not to wait until they are completly lost to initiate a mayday, maydays dont always mean RIT will come running, some can be talked out of their situations but only if they call mayday before the @&it hits the fan so to speak.

      Do RIT drills and you will quickly see how ineffective RIT is because it is always initiated after all is lost due to the current training of our firefighters, perservere and push through it...
      Having FAST "on deck" or closer to the actual "battle" coupled with earlier mayday calls will result in a rescue most times it is initiated. Get you guys recognizing when to call a mayday, teach them there is no pride in running out of air, or trying to find their way out if they are lost, mayday alerts all on the scene and mentally prepares them for their deployment, if you train them that when mayday comes it is the end of someone they will react as that and it will be controlled chaos at best every time you hear the spine shivering mayday calls...

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by Canadian_fyrfighter View Post

        FAST or RIT should be proactive, never reactive!

        Dont deploy RIT on the bulding entrance and "wait for trouble", get themcloser and use them.

        Advice I have is to stop thinking RIT, Think FAST, and deploy them closer or "on deck" to the fire crews. RIT should be working, doing medial tasks closer the attack or ventilation crews at highest risk, sitting outside isnt going to help the crews at risk on the third floor if it all goes bad. A well trained firefighter will not get into a bad situation knowing he will risk others to do so, ...
        I agree a RIT team should be proactive. In my dept they are required to throw at least 2 ground ladders, depending on fire location, where FF's might need them most and remove obsticles from windows(burglur bars, A/C units,ets). But I don't agree they should be working at the fire. They need to be ready to assist someone immediately. Not stop in the middle of some medical task someone else should be doing to rescue someone. They need to be constantly monitoring the radio for a call for help. Also looking at the building for signs of collapse or if someone suddenly appears at a window is distress.
        In your 3-story building, where would you have them? Inside? If they weren't fighting the fire then they're in the way and adding to the life hazzard.
        We do have RIT teams inside for highrise fires. We had a fire on the 27th floor of a building and had two teams staged on floor 25. Other than that If they get involved with the fire, they're distracted from the job they're there for.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by len1582 View Post
          But I don't agree they should be working at the fire. They need to be ready to assist someone immediately. Not stop in the middle of some medical task someone else should be doing to rescue someone.
          I agree completly, but I do believe I said MEDIAL tasks, as in small, quick, close tasks, not medical. I agree that RIT cannot and should not be distracted from their orginal assignment, but they certainly arenty there to stand in one place and wait for **** to happen, whenit does, they are going for body recovery and that is unacceptable to me.

          Originally posted by len1582 View Post
          In your 3-story building, where would you have them? Inside? If they weren't fighting the fire then they're in the way and adding to the life hazzard.
          As a company officer I would have them in the structure ready to be deployed, but it completly depends onthe complexity of that structure, the fires location and involvement, buillding type etc.
          If the attack and or ventilation crews are on the first floor, then there is no need to enter as RIT or FAST, if it is on the second floor, then perhaps yes, they would be deployed in the stairwell below the fire floor opposite to the involved area tools in hand, involvement on the third floor, RIT perhaps would again be in the stairwell below the fire floor, or even in cases in the aerial bucket placed in an adjacent suite balcony....Really, emphasis is to think outside the box of ground operations if you have the resources available to you...


          Originally posted by len1582 View Post
          We do have RIT teams inside for highrise fires. We had a fire on the 27th floor of a building and had two teams staged on floor 25. Other than that If they get involved with the fire, they're distracted from the job they're there for.
          See, just like your three story walkup...(only larger) FAST teams could be on the floor below the fire crews, (deployment) with a backup crew on the second floor below (staging). Every fire will dicate different deployment, a large concrete building with the blaze contained in a suite, then they could be behind fire doors on the floor ready for deployment. As you know RIT or FAST should take the most direct, rapidist means available to get the downed firefighter(s), time is money in essence.

          Still all in all, proactive is far better than reactive IMO.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Canadian_fyrfighter View Post
            I agree completly, but I do believe I said MEDIAL tasks, as in small, quick, close tasks, not medical. I agree that RIT cannot and should not be distracted from their orginal assignment, but they certainly arenty there to stand in one place and wait for **** to happen, whenit does, they are going for body recovery and that is unacceptable to me.


            As a company officer I would have them in the structure ready to be deployed, but it completly depends onthe complexity of that structure, the fires location and involvement, buillding type etc.
            If the attack and or ventilation crews are on the first floor, then there is no need to enter as RIT or FAST, if it is on the second floor, then perhaps yes, they would be deployed in the stairwell below the fire floor opposite to the involved area tools in hand, involvement on the third floor, RIT perhaps would again be in the stairwell below the fire floor, or even in cases in the aerial bucket placed in an adjacent suite balcony....Really, emphasis is to think outside the box of ground operations if you have the resources available to you...



            See, just like your three story walkup...(only larger) FAST teams could be on the floor below the fire crews, (deployment) with a backup crew on the second floor below (staging). Every fire will dicate different deployment, a large concrete building with the blaze contained in a suite, then they could be behind fire doors on the floor ready for deployment. As you know RIT or FAST should take the most direct, rapidist means available to get the downed firefighter(s), time is money in essence.

            Still all in all, proactive is far better than reactive IMO.
            Yes you did say that. Sometimes I don't wear the reading glasses.

            Being staged in a stairwell is not practical in my area. Most stairways are narrow, along with the halls. People standing not moving doing something would be in the way.

            Also, there's always noise in the fire building. Hoselines in operation, ceilings being pulled, walls being opened,etc. It would be difficult to closely monitor the radio and hear a call for help. Monitoring the radio is essential for the RIT team. The IC can't always hear everything with rigs pumping and aerial ladders in high idle around him.

            How about tool selection? Do you expect them to carry every tool inside to stage? Not every tool might be needed, but they're loaded down like pack mules if they bring everything in with them.

            On a similar note..A short time ago there was a post here asking if a handlind should be brought in with the RIT team. Many said yes they should. I don't feel they should as an everyday rule. But what if one was needed? Who would bring it if everyone else is involved with suppression?

            Does your Dept have a SOP for RIT?

            Not trying to be confrontational here. Just having a discussion.

            Comment


            • #21
              Our fire dept. does have an SOP for RIT. We do not require our teams to bring in a handline. We will either use a search line anchored outside the structure or the hoseline used on the initial attack

              Comment


              • #22
                RIT/FAST Powerpoint

                i have to teach a RIT class to a department on a very tight budget (i'm sure we all do). anyone have a powerpoint and lesson plan i could take a look at to get some ideas. thanks.

                Comment


                • #23
                  I have a couple of powerpoints that I use to teach RIT.

                  I also teach a 12 hour class on a regional basis which is about 75% hands-on. I'd be happy to give you the practical skill lesson plan as well.

                  I also have a self-rescue class that I teach.

                  Contact me at [email protected].
                  Last edited by LaFireEducator; 05-09-2011, 02:14 PM.
                  Train to fight the fires you fight.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by pelican615 View Post
                    I've recently heard from instructors and some neighboring departments that they are getting away from the "Denver" Drill. This, however, does not solve the problem at hand when it was first designed and used. Does anyone have any ideas as to where I can find some information and newer strategies? Has anyone toyed around with some things and found success? Any ideas would be appreciated!
                    While the Denver Drill does have limited value in most RIT situations, it does work well as a team problem solving and communications exercise. To me, that is it's primary value.

                    Look at the buildings in your district and potential problems that the construction will create when it comes to removing a firefighter, then design your drills around your district.
                    Train to fight the fires you fight.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Looking for an outside vendor to come in to teach and certify firefighters in RIT training that is NFPA 1407 compliant.

                      Has anyone done this and who did you use. Located in Northeast (more specifically Maine).

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        We base our RIT structure off FDTN training. http://www.fdtraining.com/NewCourses...or-Rapid-11481


                        We utilize a notation in our CAD that gets us a RIT team prompt at 3 mins into a potentional strucutre fire call. It is up the the first due officer to fill the RIT box if they feel there is a fire and not a false call.

                        Comment

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