Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Extreme Cold Ops?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • ElectricHoser
    replied
    Have done it both ways.

    As mentioned above, don't try to go dry pump unless you KNOW that the valve will seal and keep the pump truly dry, as having a few gallons sloshing around will freeze up faster than a full pump.

    I have worked where winter temps go below zero for days or weeks. We generally ran wet pump to everything, and recirculated on the scene. The pump and the water start out at 65F, it still takes a while to freeze.

    Running wet pumps also means you are not opening and cycling the drain valve so much or having to possibly leave it open while rolling, both of which increase the chances of fouling the seal.

    OTOH our district was only 36 square miles so we didn't ever have to run too far even for MA.

    Leave a comment:


  • chiefengineer11
    replied
    Originally posted by Maverick21 View Post
    1st post. FF/EMT for 5 years, vol./paid guy. If this subject has been covered please let me know where to look. I'm looking for info/operating techniques used by FD's that regularly operate in sub freezing temps. Our SOP in the winter is to have all pumps dry in house, roll w/ dry pumps and flow water as needed. I'm familiar w/ always having a little water trickling from the hose when not actively flowing water on fire to avoid nozzle freezing. Do you roll w/ dry pumps? Has tank to pump ever frozen en route? Do you have tips/tricks/suggestions for draining the pump when you get back to the house. We responded to MVA last night w/ -22 temps, did not flow water. Once back in service it took 1 hour for the drains to warm enough to drain the pump. Also if you drain your pump/valves/drains after every call do you expect the pump to stay dry or does the tank leak a little water into the pump? Our average winter temps are 20 degrees F.+-. It hasn't been above -10 for 2 days.
    More later and thanks,
    M21
    It's extremely rare for us to see temps under 0F, so I can't deal directly with them. +20 to single digits + are not uncommon. I know of some departments in our area that go with dry pumps. We don't; we keep ours wet year round. Several reasons, and some things that would cause us to change our ways on occasion:

    Our station is heated to 65F or more all the time. Our runs are quite short, usually under 10 minutes from leaving the station to on location. Our SOP in below freezing temps is, upon arrival, if you're not going into service flowing water, immediately go into pump mode and begin circulating water tank to pump and back. Now you have 500+ gallons to bring to freezing temperature, and it will take a long, long time to do that. Especially with the heat generated by the pump, boosted by the exhaust system heat. And if you have an older, mid-engine truck, so much the better. In our specific case, we have one more thing going for us - our apparatus bay heat is in the floor, adding to the pump heat. And because the pump water is kept warm, the drains don't freeze, either. We do have to be careful to see that our deck gun riser and the gun itself are drained down.

    Another point to consider - unless you know for absolute certain that your tank to pump valve and your tank fill valve are perfectly tight, you probably have a wet pump anyway. What's really bad is if you have one with only a few gallons in it. That can freeze up in a hurry.

    If we were to be called on a mutual aid run that would take a long time to travel, and the temperature were super cold, I'd probably want to drain down before leaving the station, and I'd be tempted to leave the drain valve open during transit.

    That's my take on it, and I haven't frozen any pumps yet. The dry pump advocates will surely have a different take on it, and hopefully they'll present some good arguments for their positions. Rescue101, where are you?

    Stay safe out there, everyone goes home!
    Last edited by chiefengineer11; 01-13-2007, 04:56 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maverick21
    started a topic Extreme Cold Ops?

    Extreme Cold Ops?

    1st post. FF/EMT for 5 years, vol./paid guy. If this subject has been covered please let me know where to look. I'm looking for info/operating techniques used by FD's that regularly operate in sub freezing temps. Our SOP in the winter is to have all pumps dry in house, roll w/ dry pumps and flow water as needed. I'm familiar w/ always having a little water trickling from the hose when not actively flowing water on fire to avoid nozzle freezing. Do you roll w/ dry pumps? Has tank to pump ever frozen en route? Do you have tips/tricks/suggestions for draining the pump when you get back to the house. We responded to MVA last night w/ -22 temps, did not flow water. Once back in service it took 1 hour for the drains to warm enough to drain the pump. Also if you drain your pump/valves/drains after every call do you expect the pump to stay dry or does the tank leak a little water into the pump? Our average winter temps are 20 degrees F.+-. It hasn't been above -10 for 2 days.
    More later and thanks,
    M21

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X