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Antifreeze in Hale pump

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  • Antifreeze in Hale pump

    Our FD just purchased a 1995 pumper. It has an HME 6 man cab, with a Luverne body, 750gal. poly tank, 1250gpm Hale pump, Allison automatic transmission, powered by a 330 Cummins. The truck has preformed excellent for us, drafts great, pumps, and runs great as well. We only have one problem, we are losing our engine coolant to the pump. We noticed the problem at a training with the pumper when the temperature was raising rapidly, so I opened the heat exchanger valve, then the dreaded alarm sounded. I opened the control panel door to acess the pump and it felt cool, so I opened the intake and let it overflow onto the exterior of the pump and the temp. dropped and the engine cooled shortly after. Since then cold weather has hit and I drain the pump everytime after a call, and have noticed ALOT of antifreeze in the pump water. The antifreeze only enters the pump when the pump is enguaged. We are a small voulenteer department without alot of funding, and without a maintence crew, so I am wondering if anyone can help me with this issue. I am somewhat mechanically inclined I have repacked a 1978 1000gpm waterous pump. And I have priced a new heat exchanger from Darley for $285, again if anyone has an answer please help.

  • #2
    Only two things I can think of.

    1. The heat exchanger. You already seem to have that idea and it is most often the culprit. You might want to save yourself a lot of trouble and make sure you get an exact match to the existing unit. Sendure makes all of the ones I have seen with the exception of exchangers built directly into the pump housing.

    2. A radiator refill valve. These used to be a regular thing but are becoming rarer. Some builders even hid them behind an access panel rather than out in the open. However, you would be getting the antifreeze when the pump was not running rather than at pressures above the PSI of the radiator cap. Additionally, most builders install a check valve in this line.

    Good luck. Hope everything goes smooth.

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    • #3
      Why dont you unhook coolant lines loop them together then run the pump ,should get pump water out of fittings for the coolant on the exchanger. If this don't work pull it off and pressurize to 15 lbs max. It nearly has to be the problem though. Shop around be very careful about using a used one. I don't recomend this. Check it to make sure water flows through it good and it don't leak. Check engine antifreeze to it could be diluted and depending on your local water quality you may want to flush and refill with distilled water and new coolant. Good luck.

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      • #4
        Are you sure you arent opening the emergency radiator fill instead of the heat exchanger ? If not - my guess is the copper line(coil) in yhe exchanger is leaking and letting cooliant into the pump
        ?

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        • #5
          Your assumptions are correct. We've got some older HME's with the heat exchangers, and after time, they break down internally. This causes the A/F to leak into the pump, and does create a overheating issue. Most have an engine cooler valve that you can close. This will stop the problem until you get a replacement exchanger.

          You shouldn't have an issue getting an exact replacement. I just did one on a '92 HME a couple months ago, and had no problems getting the same setup/design.

          FM1
          I'm the one Fire and Rescue calls, when they need to be Rescued.

          Originally posted by EastKyFF
          "Firemens gets antsies. Theys wants to goes to fires. Sometimeses they haves to waits."

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          • #6
            Thanks to all for the advise and help. Now I just have to get dirty and get it replaced.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Atlanta802 View Post
              Thanks to all for the advise and help. Now I just have to get dirty and get it replaced.
              It's the job!

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Atlanta802 View Post
                Thanks to all for the advise and help. Now I just have to get dirty and get it replaced.
                All mine are on DD60's, and are mounted right above the valve cover. Shouldn't be too hard or dirty to replace it. Say an hour or so for replacement and topping off the coolant, then test.

                On the Cummins engines, they are behind the forward removable panel forward of the pump panel. Time is basically the same.

                FM1
                I'm the one Fire and Rescue calls, when they need to be Rescued.

                Originally posted by EastKyFF
                "Firemens gets antsies. Theys wants to goes to fires. Sometimeses they haves to waits."

                Comment

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