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  • Galvaneal, aluminium, or?

    for the body, Galvaneal, aluminium, or?

    I like Galvaneal so far.

  • #2
    I am no apparatus designer, but...; I have yet to see paint stay on aluminum for very long here in Minnesota. Especially by hinges, edges, and handles. Appears to be corrosion to me.
    My posts reflect my views and opinions, not the organization I work for or my IAFF local. Some of which they may not agree. I.A.C.O.J. member
    "I ask, Sir, what is the militia? It is the whole people. To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them."
    George Mason
    Co-author of the Second Amendment
    during Virginia's Convention to Ratify the Constitution, 1788
    Elevator Rescue Information

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    • #3
      Aluminum is all we use at work (40+ front-line suppression pieces), and we've had good luck with it.

      We have a mixture of stainless steel and aluminum at the VFD, and haven't seen any great difference between the two.

      Often times, your selection will be based on the elements you'll have to deal with most often.

      With a handful of exceptions, galvaneal hasn't been purchased in our area for a couple of decades.
      Career Fire Captain
      Volunteer Chief Officer


      Never taking for granted that I'm privileged enough to have the greatest job in the world!

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      • #4
        We have been told a number of times the dirt roads that are our main form of road here are best handled by Galvaneal, but I want to get this right.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by LVFD301
          We have been told a number of times the dirt roads that are our main form of road here are best handled by Galvaneal, but I want to get this right.
          Not sure where exactly your located, so I can't really recommend one over the other when it comes to weather conditions.

          Is S/S too expensive to think about as an option for the body???

          FM1
          I'm the one Fire and Rescue calls, when they need to be Rescued.

          Originally posted by EastKyFF
          "Firemens gets antsies. Theys wants to goes to fires. Sometimeses they haves to waits."

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          • #6
            If you can afford stainless steel usually a 5-10k option get it. Stainless steel is second to nothing if you are anywhere that uses road salt.

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            • #7
              We always spec s/s.

              Great performance, I would highly recommend if you can afford it and plan on keeping your apparatus for more then 10 years.
              I am now a past chief and the views, opinions, and comments are mine and mine alone. I do not speak for any department or in any official capacity. Although, they would be smart to listen to me.

              "The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list."

              "When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire Department usually uses water."

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              • #8
                Our 1978 Galvaneal Peirce was totally different than our 1999 Central States galvaneal. The fomer held up very well, the latter is a rust bucket, having had major work to keep it alive over the last 11 years. I would attribute this to a few factors. One, the older galvaneal had more mass (thicker) and was of higher quality. The second is the new liquid road "salt" that is eating all our vehicles much faster than ever. Not sure why anyone would want galvaneal here, where there's constant salt air from the ocean, but we've owned them with two significantly different outcomes.

                I think you need to look at the factors you'll subject the material to. We're now going with stainless, but that's also no silver bullet. All materials have strengths and weaknesses and your particular application may need to address them specifically.

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                • #9
                  If you are located in the rust belt or Northeast spec stainless. it is the only way to go. You should also look for a stainless subframe.
                  Last edited by sven73; 12-29-2010, 09:10 AM. Reason: Added third sentance.

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                  • #10
                    Located in southern missouri. Right on the state line with Arkansas. Maybe subjected to liquid melt from DOT a couple of times a year. Maybe.

                    A few years ago we were warned about aluminium on the twisting nature of our dirt roads, causing the body to flex and possibly crack.

                    Stainless may be a cost issue, I am not sure yet.
                    Last edited by LVFD301; 12-29-2010, 08:33 AM.

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                    • #11
                      Compare

                      Stainless steel- Pro's- Great corrosion resistance, extremely strong
                      and durable
                      Con's- expensive, hard to drill (if you like to do your
                      own mounting of equipment), and heavy

                      Aluminum- Pro's- Corrosion resistant, light weight, easy to drill and mount to
                      Con's- Expense (not as much as SS though), dissimilar metals
                      corrosion (if manfacturer does not assemble it properly)

                      Gallvaneel- Pro's- Cheapest choice, drills easily
                      Con's- Corrodes faster than the other choices

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                      • #12
                        Galvaneal?..........NO! NEVER! "My" fleet is aluminum although S/S wouldn't be a bad choice. The quality of Galvaneal varies widely but it WILL NOT be specced here. As Adam has alluded,too many rust issues where we live. The liquid body death(deicer) they put on the roads around here eat anything steel based. T.C.
                        Last edited by Rescue101; 12-29-2010, 09:57 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by BoxAlarm187 View Post
                          Aluminum is all we use at work (40+ front-line suppression pieces), and we've had good luck with it.

                          We have a mixture of stainless steel and aluminum at the VFD, and haven't seen any great difference between the two.

                          Often times, your selection will be based on the elements you'll have to deal with most often.

                          With a handful of exceptions, galvaneal hasn't been purchased in our area for a couple of decades.
                          We had a bunch of apparatus back in the late 1980's and early 1990's that were made of galvaneal, which box is familar with. Now it is Alumimum.
                          Stay Safe and Well Out There....

                          Always remembering 9-11-2001 and 343+ Brothers

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by sven73 View Post
                            If you are located in the rust belt or Northeast spec stainless. it is the only way to go. You should also look for a stainless subframe.
                            Yup. Agreed 100%. Our 1989 Duplex/Quality Galvaneal is a piece of schit rust bucket.
                            "Loyalty Above all Else. Except Honor."

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                            • #15
                              We had a couple of galvaneal bodies. Under ten years old and they were ready for the scrap heap.
                              We now use all extruded & welded aluminum bodies. It holds up well on our roads, which are like yours with the addition of being surrounded by the ocean so we have a very corrosive environment. Add in the fact that they use both the liquid sodium and tons of rock salt on the roads in winter.
                              If you spec that they use and acid primer and then finish it Aluminum will hold paint very well. We've got a 91 Central that's just starting to get a little "white rust paint bubbling around the wheel well trim.
                              Another important thing to spec is that they use ECK corrosion sealant on any exterior fasteners and mounting screws/bolts including warning lights.

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