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  • npfd801
    replied
    Spartan does offer a two door cab, neiowa - I shot you an e-mail giving you at least some idea what it looks like.

    Leave a comment:


  • neiowa
    replied
    Originally posted by SkipJack270 View Post
    Here is the website for Spartan.. http://www.spartanchassis.com/ft/default.asp
    You can check out the options, though from the limited amount I've poked around, it looks like it is likely a much larger cab than you are looking for.
    Also, just my two cents on Int'l, but they are also fairly easy to maintain and repair.

    Been there only shows "crewcab" I's swear I've seen photos of trucks with 2dr custom cab. Maybe not Spartan. Called them/left callback # but nothing yet.

    Leave a comment:


  • SkipJack270
    replied
    Here is the website for Spartan.. http://www.spartanchassis.com/ft/default.asp
    You can check out the options, though from the limited amount I've poked around, it looks like it is likely a much larger cab than you are looking for.
    Also, just my two cents on Int'l, but they are also fairly easy to maintain and repair.

    Leave a comment:


  • neiowa
    replied
    Originally posted by SkipJack270 View Post
    Not sure what your specific needs are, but I would not discount Spartan as a potential chassis.
    Any of there models (economy) available as a 2dr (2man) tandem rear? Cost competitive with a large IH or Freightliner ($90k +/-)?
    Last edited by neiowa; 08-01-2007, 12:59 PM.

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  • SkipJack270
    replied
    Not sure what your specific needs are, but I would not discount Spartan as a potential chassis.
    Speaking as someone who is a dedicated emergency vehicle mechanic, and being employed by a Smeal dealer, I have to at least shill a little for them.
    Smeal has long dealt with Spartan, which is a chassis manufacturer out of Michigan. Although they started out in motorcoaches, they make a fine emergency vehicle chassis.
    Again, going from the viewpoint of a mechanic, I can say that the chassis are extremely well constructed; the lines and the design are done in such a way so as to make maintenance and repairs simple. However, don't get the idea that Spartan is a chassis that requires repair often. It is solid, it is versatile, and it is packed with very nice features.
    I realize this was kind of a barkers version of Spartan, but you should at least look into them for comparison. Hope it helps.

    Leave a comment:


  • DFDMAXX
    replied
    My primary employer has a yard full of big mercedes engines, some aproaching 500,000 miles. No problems. We have a mix of highway and vocational use.

    The owner and the mechanics like the mercedes. Other than normal preventive maintenance, and the occasional overhead adjustments ( valves ) they have been strong runners, with minimal repairs compared to the C-12 & C-15 Cats, and M11 Cummins we have run.

    Leave a comment:


  • neiowa
    replied
    Any problems with MBE 900/4000 engines

    IH sales guy making a big point about the MBE not having wet/replacable cylinder liners. Anyone had any particular problems here?

    Given that we may put 25000mi on new truck in 25yr never going to wear it out. Only likely cause of blowing up the engine/need to rebuild would be due to stupidity.

    Leave a comment:


  • Catch22
    replied
    On our new pumper/tanker (2,500 gallon tank), we went with a KW chassis and a 330 Cummins. A lot of the reasoning was the same as these guys talk about. Some other aspects include that I work on Freightliners at my FT department. I like the M-series a LOT better than the older style, but I'm still not a big fan, too easy to tear up stuff in the cab and no one around is overly familiar with the Mercedes diesels.

    Our dept. mechanic is a big Cummins guy, plus we've got Cummins and KW dealers/shops all over the place, so that weighed in. However, we're fairly flat, so you may want to look into a bigger motor. We felt the 330 would get us around, but not have so much power some guys will get into trouble in the hills and curves in some parts of our district.

    Plus, we felt a KW is a rig that should take a lot of abuse (they're built for over the road, after all). Take service, price, and availability, add a little personal preference, and you'll end up with a decision you'll live with for 15+ years.

    Leave a comment:


  • npfd801
    replied
    Yeah, I should have said DC. Growing up in a town with a DC plant, the whole "merger" (yeah, label it what you want I suppose) has been very good for the facility, but I think it was a merger much in the same way I "mergered" my dinner this evening...

    Leave a comment:


  • Frmboybuck
    replied
    Actually if you want to get technical about it....DCAG owns both along with numerous other companies

    Leave a comment:


  • npfd801
    replied
    Its actually the other way around, Mercedes bought out Detroit...

    Detroit Diesel History
    Last edited by npfd801; 10-11-2006, 09:47 PM. Reason: typo

    Leave a comment:


  • Frmboybuck
    replied
    Yea, Ive worked on them... I drive one also. ANYONE who services Detroit, will service the Mercedes since they are owned by Detroit. All the shops keep current on this stuff today.....This isnt the 70's Im happy with the power of my Mercedes. Its got alot more pep and gets better fuel milage than my C-12

    Leave a comment:


  • Rescue101
    replied
    Farmboy,you ever work on a late model Mercedes? Trust me,it's not your grandfathers diesel,they are NOT like everybody elses and I don't know too many mechanics that enjoy working on them.And not every dealership or truck shop will work on them.Some will, some won't. So far we're not towing a lot of them,they make decent power,but they ARE a pain to work on.Won't affect me,we run exclusively Cumaparts.And NO they do not all operate the same.Basic principal perhaps but programming and logic curves are a whole other ball game.Try the fueling system on a Volvo sometime if you want an excercise in terror. T.C.

    Leave a comment:


  • chiefengineer11
    replied
    Originally posted by Frmboybuck
    Any Freightliner or Volvo dealer is more than qualified to service a Mercedes....For that matter ANY dealer is qualified to work on them. They are just an engine and they all operate the same
    Farmboy, in principle, you're right, a diesel engine is a diesel engine. But even so, I gotta go with Birken on this one. I owned a '71 Mercedes tractor that I bought in '71 as a demo with 10,000 miles on it. I traded it at 443,000 miles not counting those when the speedometer didn't work, drove them all myself. Since Mercedes had very few truck dealerships in the country at the time and none west of Wheeling, W.Va., I had to learn to take care of it myself.

    Granted, it really was a pretty simple and basic engine. But there always were those little differences, those quirks of German engineering that set them apart and made them different from anything else. It was a fantastic engine, but it had its own personality that you had to learn.

    Any good diesel technician can learn them and be good at them, but if they haven't, too bad.

    Stay safe out there, everyone goes home!

    Leave a comment:


  • Frmboybuck
    replied
    Originally posted by BirkenVogt
    Also consider service. Even after several years it is still tough to find people qualified to work on that Mercedes engine.

    Birken

    Any Freightliner or Volvo dealer is more than qualified to service a Mercedes....For that matter ANY dealer is qualified to work on them. They are just an engine and they all operate the same

    Leave a comment:

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