Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

vacuum tankers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • vacuum tankers

    I am looking for any imput from people whos departments have vacuum tankers why you decide on them, Are you still happy with that distion, What problems have you had with them if any, how hard is it to learn to use them, wich company did you go with to build, how did you convice the oppasition in your department, and any other imput you have


    (I am aware there are other posts on this but most of wich are old and wanted some new ideas and diffrent imput)

    Any thing on the subject would be great as we are looking in to them for our new tanker

  • #2
    Tankers

    We have 2 vacuum tankers on our dept. This is only my 2nd. year on the dept. Vacuum tankers are good for several reasons. You can fill at dry hydrents, rivers, lakes and ponds with one person and no fill unit. I have filled our 3500 gallon tanker in a very short period of time. I never timed it. They are good if you are short handed because you do not need a fill unit. They also have pressure dump. The only bad thing is no pump and hose on ours. Hope this helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      We have a Firovac tanker. It's build on a Peterbilt chassis and has been in service since 1994. Everyone on the department loves it. We've had no major problems with it and it is our first out tanker.
      The self loading capability is very nice, especially for a large fire. Being able to go to a different dry hydrant than the rest of the tankers makes things more efficient for everybody. Depending on the hydrant and the connection, we can generally load the truck (3,000 gallons) in 3 - 5 minutes at most. I can try to get some pictures of the truck if you'd like. Let me know if you would like to know anything else about it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Decision?

        Which manufacturer/model did you decide to go with? Were there any factors leading to the decision? We are comparing both companies (Water Master and Firovac) and would appreciate any insite from departments that have gone through the same process. We would like some info from someone other than salesman
        Mike Ely
        Batt. Chief, Linn Fire Prot. District
        [email protected]
        www.linnfire.com

        Comment


        • #5
          Our dept too is looking at a vacuum tanker. I have used a Watermaster at another dept and loved it. It takes a little getting used to the console and the total operation but once you get the hang of it I thought it was a breeze to use. I would like to see more pictures of other dept's vacuum tankers if you would like to send them to [email protected] it would apprerciate it. We are wanting ideas on storage spaces lighting configurations and such. Thanks!

          Comment


          • #6
            When I worked for ALF we did a vacuum tanker at the service center in N.C.
            Actually, the tanker was made by some out fit in Mississippi, we added the compartments and warning lights. We took the unit out to a bridge to make a movie for some show that was comming up. We dropped 3 sections of 6" hard suction over the side of the bridge and tied it off to the rail, the lift was 18' from the water to the intake. In 3 mins. we filled a 3,500 gallon tank. This "tanker shuttle" was done several times so we could show that one man could do it in the movie.
            The only draw back to this unit I saw was the pump. Since the pump is only moving air, you can get anything in the tank, they make septic tank trucks with the same pumps! Our illustrious sales dept. wanted to show in the movie that this pump would not be hurt by sucking up mud and junk from the bottom of the river. It took awhile to make them understand that all this truck was going to do was haul water, not fight fires. The trucks that this one would supply had pumps with impellers and they did not like MUD! If your salesman is using this line to help sale the unit please do not listen to him. If you are not careful you can destroy the pumps in your first out Engines with a vacuum tanker. Also, if you pressurize the tank before you open the discharge, you will blow the drop tank across the parking lot and into the field across the road! For take 2 of filling the drop tank, I opened the discharge then pressurized the tank to fill a bent up 4,000 gallon drop tank.
            The A/C is not cold enough, the warning lights are not bright enough, siren is not loud enough, the C.D. player skips every time we jump a curb, cab doors only open to 89.5* and it's been like this since day one!!!!

            Comment


            • #7
              Semo builds mostly eliptical, but they build alot of vaccuum tankers for there commericial business. They would be good to look at as the commercial trucks get used much more than our fire tankers.

              Comment


              • #8
                vacuum tanker info

                First of all, what kind of strainer if any was being used during this ALF demonstration and or video. I have used many vacuum tankers and have never had a problem like that at all. If the unit got mud or any other debre into the vacuum pump then it was either operator error or a manufacturing error in design. Second, if a department knows that there might be any chance during drafting that some kind of debre might even go through a "fire" strainer then why not use a floating strainer or a ladder to keep the end of the suction hose off the bottom? I would like to see this video that was made if anybody knows where I can get one or go online to view it.
                Thanks!

                Comment


                • #9
                  "Our illustrious sales dept. wanted to show in the movie that this pump would not be hurt by sucking up mud and junk from the bottom of the river. It took awhile to make them understand that all this truck was going to do was haul water, not fight fires. The trucks that this one would supply had pumps with impellers and they did not like MUD!"

                  I never said we actually let the unit suck up mud. Sales wanted us to, they thought it would be a good idea to do this!
                  The A/C is not cold enough, the warning lights are not bright enough, siren is not loud enough, the C.D. player skips every time we jump a curb, cab doors only open to 89.5* and it's been like this since day one!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Mikeefly,
                    Our department looked at both brands prior to purchasing the Water Master. The only problem we have had with it is the tank to pump valve leaking due to our extremely hard water. Water Master stood behind it as well which is a bonus. When comparing the two, in our departments opinion the Water Master was laid out and thought through a little more. Overall the truck is laid out well and simple to operate, we can't wait to get another when we replace a conventional tanker in a couple years.
                    Regardless of which brand you choose, the vacuum tanker will out perform the conventional. At our state fire school there were nine conventional tankers and our vacuum which was the last in line to dump. The conventionals went to a seperate fill site, our vacuum went to a second one and had to set it up due to a instructor oversight. It was the fourth tanker back to dump, from then on it was running serious circles around the other tankers.
                    Vacuum tankers are a good investment in my opinion.
                    Train like you want to fight.
                    www.kvfd.net

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Our department took delivery of a Watermaster 3000 gallon vacuum tanker this past November and so far we love it. We made a mutual aid call where 5 other tankers showed up from surrounding departments and it performed GREAT! We were able to draft from a pond about a half mile away from the fire while all of the others had to drive about an 8 1/2 mile round trip to fill from a hydrant. Needless to say, everybody was seriously impressed. We are in a rural area and the decision for a vacuum tanker was a no brainer. There were a couple of bugs that had to be worked out on it after delivery but Lance from Watermaster is great and has been a pleasure to work with. Hope this helps.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Vacuum Tankers

                        There is another choice in the vacuum tanker field. The company is in Florida, their name is EAM-syphon. The look very similar to Water Master, but they offer a whole lot more along the lines of service and better delivery times. Check them out. Their prices are much better as well.

                        Comment

                        300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                        Collapse

                        Upper 300x250

                        Collapse

                        Taboola

                        Collapse

                        Leader

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X