Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Aerial apparatus

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Aerial apparatus

    We are looking into getting an aerial apparatus. We are trying to get input on what other departments have. What they like and don't like. Platform vs. aerial, midmount vs. rear mount, tillers. We are looking at about 100'. Thanks

  • #2
    What types of buildings do you cover? What heights? What setbacks? Lot's of trees and/or power lines above ground? Narrow and/or wide streets with lots of outrigger space? Limitations to the height/length of the building it will park in? LOTS of things to consider when looking at aerial devices.
    "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

    Comment


    • #3
      more

      Too add to Bones also do you want a quint and how about tip load. We are a mix of 100' PAP, straight stick and tillers.

      Comment


      • #4
        You're going to have to give A LOT more information than that if you want a decent answer:

        Who throws ladders now?
        Who ventilates now?
        Who searches now?
        Who comes with an aerial, with what, and from how far away?
        Is your station staffed?
        How many people ride on each unit now?
        How many buildings over 3 storys?
        How tall are you buildings?
        How far away from the street are they?
        Is there a lot of on-street parking?
        How narrow are your streets?
        Do you have bridge problems?
        Do you have overpass problems?

        My guess is that, if you're getting by now, without one, you're best fit would probably be a 75' - 100' quint, or possibly a short wheelbase straight truck.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bones42
          What types of buildings do you cover? What heights? What setbacks? Lot's of trees and/or power lines above ground? Narrow and/or wide streets with lots of outrigger space? Limitations to the height/length of the building it will park in? LOTS of things to consider when looking at aerial devices.
          The tallest building we have are 3 stories. Setbacks are about 25'. We don't have lots of trees or powerlines. Streets are fairly wide and level.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by lvwrench
            Too add to Bones also do you want a quint and how about tip load. We are a mix of 100' PAP, straight stick and tillers.
            Yes on quint. Tip load of 750 lbs.
            Last edited by JohnnyO152; 09-06-2006, 04:31 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              Most straight stick aerials will have a dry tip load of 750 lbs and a wet tip load of 500 lbs. That should hold true for either a 75' or 100' aerial.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by SBrooks
                You're going to have to give A LOT more information than that if you want a decent answer:

                Who throws ladders now?
                Who ventilates now?
                Who searches now?
                Who comes with an aerial, with what, and from how far away?
                Is your station staffed?
                How many people ride on each unit now?
                How many buildings over 3 storys?
                How tall are you buildings?
                How far away from the street are they?
                Is there a lot of on-street parking?
                How narrow are your streets?
                Do you have bridge problems?
                Do you have overpass problems?

                My guess is that, if you're getting by now, without one, you're best fit would probably be a 75' - 100' quint, or possibly a short wheelbase straight truck.
                Currently we do have a 65' telesqurt. We run 4 people on each engine. Our stations are staffed. Three stories are the tallest building in our district.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Do you have experience with different brands and needed options?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It's my esteemed opinion that all firetrucks are crap, but this can be overcome with good service from the dealer / service center. Just about everyone makes a 75' or a 100' quint. Go with the best dealer.

                    I've no first hand experience with quints. If it's going to replace the telesquirt, will you use it as engine, or more or less as a truck?

                    If mostly a truck, make sure it has plenty of ladders. Perhaps start spec'ing an additional 35' ladder on your engines.

                    If mostly an engine with a stick, get one of those side mounted hosebeds. Mount at least 1 200' preconnect on your front bumper.

                    I've worked on Seagrave, Pierce, LTI, and E-one ladders. I actually liked the E-one ladder the best, and the seagrave bodies the best. I've never used a prepiped waterway. For several thousand cheaper, you can just pipe the bed section. Especially if you keep the TS. I generally like ladders stored on their beam better than ladder stored flat. Avoid AMPS. Avoid poking things like extending lights through your cab. Look for outriggers that don't have to be pinned. I prefer one outrigger a side to two - much much easier to place, if you'll be doing it between parked cars. Mount a hook and an Axe on the fly. Mount a roof ladder on the top deck. Get a quartz light for the fly.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by SBrooks
                      It's my esteemed opinion that all firetrucks are crap, but this can be overcome with good service from the dealer / service center. Just about everyone makes a 75' or a 100' quint. Go with the best dealer.

                      I've no first hand experience with quints. If it's going to replace the telesquirt, will you use it as engine, or more or less as a truck?

                      If mostly a truck, make sure it has plenty of ladders. Perhaps start spec'ing an additional 35' ladder on your engines.

                      If mostly an engine with a stick, get one of those side mounted hosebeds. Mount at least 1 200' preconnect on your front bumper.

                      I've worked on Seagrave, Pierce, LTI, and E-one ladders. I actually liked the E-one ladder the best, and the seagrave bodies the best. I've never used a prepiped waterway. For several thousand cheaper, you can just pipe the bed section. Especially if you keep the TS. I generally like ladders stored on their beam better than ladder stored flat. Avoid AMPS. Avoid poking things like extending lights through your cab. Look for outriggers that don't have to be pinned. I prefer one outrigger a side to two - much much easier to place, if you'll be doing it between parked cars. Mount a hook and an Axe on the fly. Mount a roof ladder on the top deck. Get a quartz light for the fly.
                      Our ladder will run mostly as a truck. We probably will be using a ladder tender on other traffic. Thank you for your help.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Rear mount vs. mid mount?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by JohnnyO152
                          Rear mount vs. mid mount?
                          A rear mount 100' stick the estimated travel O.A.L. is about 40' - 42' with a tandem axle, 100' platforms over 47' for a rear mount apparatus!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I tend to favor trucks that bend, unless you really need a tower. But a good rearmount can go damn near anywhere.

                            This one has a 187" wheelbase, and a very good set of ladders.

                            http://www.burtonsvillevfd.com/apparatus/newt15.jpg

                            has anyone used the new spartan / crimson ladder?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Ok, let's sum up what we know so far. You already have a 65' Telesquirt, you want at least a 750lb tip load (wet I would assume), your streets are pretty wide and level, you want a quint, your tallest building is around 3 stories, setbacks are about 25 feet.

                              Now what about the station? Is there a height, length or weight restriction that would limit the type of truck you can get? That's actually the most important initial question, because no matter what you would like to have, if it doesn't fit in the barn, it's useless to you.

                              After that the next question you should decide on is whether or not you want a platform. Personally, I prefer working off the stable surface of one, plus it gives you the ability to rescue people quicker and rescue those who can't climb down a ladder. Big pluses right there. Additionally, a platform almost always has a higher tip load rating, usually at least 1000lbs or more. The main drawback of them is a larger, heavier truck with generally larger outriggers needed (not always the case though, as in Aerialscope and E-One).

                              Next up is whether you want a rearmount or midmount. If you have height restrictions either in your station or with overpasses around your area, a midmount is probably the way to go. The drawback is the truck is longer and usually has more of an overhang off the rearend which can bottom out if you have high crowns at intersection, or steep grade changes around town. A rearmount will be a bit shorter, but quite a bit higher and the bucket will likely hang over the cab roof.

                              Next up is length of the aerial. Once you determine the answer to the above questions, you'll have narrowed down the choices enough to where it'll be easier to decide this. I would recommend getting the longest aerial you can that fit within all the other requirements you have, including cost. Remember, you'll have this truck for probably 20 years. You don't want to buy an 85' platform or 75' stick with the mindset that it reaches every building you currently have in your area, only to have them build something a few years from now that you need that 100' to reach. Bigger is not always better, but sometimes it is and if no other factors present an obstacle to getting bigger, then do it. Plan for the future.

                              Lastly I would ask you to think about all the times you've used your Telesquirt, what you've used it for and what you wished you had different. Does it reach every building you have comfortably, or does it come up short in some areas? Have their been times you wished you had a platform to work off for ventilation and the like?
                              Last edited by Chauffer6; 09-06-2006, 07:26 PM.

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X