Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

New Truck Options?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by ffmedcbk1 View Post
    yes, on some drafting units they have installed priming systems on the outsides of the miv's. this allows priming from the drop tanks while using the pump to nurse to the attack engine. in my opinion you can essentially get the same benefit by using the low-profile strainers with 1.5" connection for jet siphoning.
    Yes a low profile will work as you suggest. It also takes on board water to make it work, not always available. You also do not have the ability to change or add and intake when you are drafting from other than a drop tank.

    Comment


    • #17
      Since time is not on my side I'll just throw something in about the suspension. Knowing Connecticut pretty well (I came from thar) I know its roads can be crappy, to put it mildly. Very similar to our roads up here in Vermont. An air ride suspension will make SUCH a difference in your ride quality.

      At my place of work all of our new trucks (Both single rear and tandem axel rigs) are being equiped with the Hendrixson air ride suspension systems. Going from a truck with springs in the back, to one with air ride is like night and day. The load isn't tossed and bumped around nearly as much, and it saves the frame and body from being beaten on constantly.

      For fire apparatus, I'm sure they would have the same effect. I wish our tanker had an air ride suspension, it would make my spine hurt less once I get back to the station.
      Opinions expressed by myself here are just that, mine. And not that of ANY organization or service I am affiliated with.

      Comment


      • #18
        Stuart:

        Since a lot of people have already commented on your specific questions, I would just offer this word of advice:

        We bought our first "attack" engine-tanker ten years ago, and our second one four years ago. It was fantastic rolling up on the first piece with 2,000-2,500 gallons of water, with another 2,000-2,500 gallons coming in second-due. It was very convenient, and brought a lot of confidence with it.

        About two years ago, we finally realized that these beasts just couldn't go enough places as a primary attack engine. Sure, there are places that they work just fine, but we have a ton of narrow driveways where the big rigs either need to stay on the road, or it takes a lot longer to maneuver them into place (in several cases causing damage to the vehicle, as well). I cannot imagine how the department with that Sutphen pumper-tanker pictured above manages to get into tight spaces.

        We've now switched back to running our 1993 1,000 gallon engine out first, with the stipulation that the second engine must follow within four minutes (thereby sustaining a 250gpm fire flow). The pumper-tankers make very versatile 2nd or 3rd/4th due pieces, and can also stand in for our 1,000 gallon piece when it's out for repair.

        If you're looking for a primary, first-out piece and really want more than 1,000 gallons, I would strongly consider something like this 1,500 gallon piece, albeit with the caveat that your hosebed height will shoot up.

        If 2,000 gallons is really your goal, I would strive for something like this, aiming to minimize all dimensions (rear overhang, front overhang, cab length/pump house/forward compartment dimension). They manage with a 6" bumper, a SMFD cab, a 44" pump house, and 31" front and rear compartment lengths. It should also be noted that they have ladders, suction hose, and dump tank on the outside, so as to provide the most compact rig possible (internal ladders & suction or full-height+full-depth compartments take so much real estate). In this case, I would opt to drop 500 gallons from the tank size (down to 2,000) in order to lower the hosebed floor. Note: I would contact this department first and ask how it rides. Our 192" wheelbase turns like a miracle but gives a ride from hell. Although the Chepachet rig has a 187.5" WB, it may ride a lot better because it has so little weight overhanging the rear axle (and the front axle).
        Last edited by BlitzfireSolo; 04-17-2011, 05:17 PM.

        Comment

        300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

        Collapse

        Upper 300x250

        Collapse

        Taboola

        Collapse

        Leader

        Collapse
        Working...
        X