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Light Rescues?

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  • firepundit
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    It may be a medium duty chassis, but it is not a medium duty rescue. Rule of thumb is that anything on a chassis like we are talking about is considered light. Medium would be a commercial chassis and heavy would be a custom chassis. At least that is the way I have always looked at it, and appearantly so do the manufacterers.

    http://svitrucks.com/rescues.asp
    From the site you linked:

    "Medium Rescues are typically built on Medium Duty 2-door, extended cab, or 4-door, 4 x 2 or 4 x 4 Commercial Freightliner, or Navistar cab/chassis in body lengths from 14' to 20'."

    Note the word, "typically" and the fact that they state they build medium duty rescues on medium duty chassis.

    The Ford F550 is a medium duty chassis. They might use literary license to call it a Superduty but their published body builder books refer to it as a medium duty. Class 5 chassis are medium duty. You can call them light duty but the truck industry doesn't.

    If Spartan were to build a chassis in the 16,000 GVWR range it would also be a medium duty since custom and commercial have no bearing on the matter.

    I have worked for body and chassis builders for over thirty years and never heard of your rule of thumb.
    Last edited by firepundit; 03-01-2011, 09:16 AM.

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  • rkulp51
    replied
    Where would the ideal spot for the third reel be? Which hydraulic tools would be best suitable for a light-medium rescue?

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  • rescueraver
    replied
    I was looking at the new Navistar Terrastar light duty truck (class 5) the other day on the lot of the dealership. I was very impressed, flip up hood, big cab,low frame height, aluminum fuel tank, big door handle, great visabilty. The truck looked to be well suited for light duty applications. The truck cab impressed me the most I wish they had a 4 door. They said they are comeing out with a four wheel drive version this year.
    Sounds like you have a nice layout, I would add a third reel and have a combi and a small gas powered unit. We have the hurst MOC combi, we hardley ever pull out the spreader the third real with a combi will allow you to have two seperate operations going at once, cutter/ spreader at one combi on the other Invest in some rescue jacks we use them more then airbags.

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  • GTRider245
    replied
    Originally posted by firepundit View Post
    A class 5 chassis is not a medium duty? When did that happen?
    It may be a medium duty chassis, but it is not a medium duty rescue. Rule of thumb is that anything on a chassis like we are talking about is considered light. Medium would be a commercial chassis and heavy would be a custom chassis. At least that is the way I have always looked at it, and appearantly so do the manufacterers.

    http://svitrucks.com/rescues.asp

    Leave a comment:


  • firepundit
    replied
    Originally posted by GTRider245 View Post
    Anything on a F-550 chassis is not medium duty...
    A class 5 chassis is not a medium duty? When did that happen?

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  • GTRider245
    replied
    Originally posted by rkulp51 View Post
    We are now looking into a medium duty. We are looking to model around a paramedic squad company such as LA county. They are the ideal rescue and would suit our district.
    Anything on a F-550 chassis is not medium duty...

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  • rkulp51
    replied
    We are now looking into a medium duty. We are looking to model around a paramedic squad company such as LA county. They are the ideal rescue and would suit our district.

    Leave a comment:


  • LaFireEducator
    replied
    Our light rescue is an F-450 4-door chassis.

    It is primarily an EMS response truck with a combi-tool, some cribbing, basic hand tools and a structural service truck w/ 6 SCBA, 6 cylinders, chainsaw, K-12, generator, portable lights and salvage covers. It also functions as the paid staff's primary runaround vehicle for daily testing, maintainence and administrative tasks.

    It replaced a 2-door version with the same chassis and box. That truck only ran on about 30% of the EMS calls as it only had 2 seats. The heavy rescue was the primary EMS response vehicle.

    We got about 6 years out of it before cycling it down to a volunteer station as a service truck.

    We plan on getting 3-4 years out of the current 4-door version before cycling it over to a service truck at one of our volunteer stations due to the increased milage of now being the primary EMS unit.

    Bulk of the heavy rescue equipment is carried on the rescue truck.

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  • backsteprescue
    replied
    To agree with the other guys, definately sounds like some sort of medium duty chassis would work much better for you guys.

    An area department had a minipumper on an F-550 chassis and ended up replacing it soon after delivery with a GMC medium duty chassis and last I heard they were happy with it.

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  • GTRider245
    replied
    Agreed. You are already outgrowing a light rescue. There are many around my area that are overloaded and you do not want to go that route.

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  • slackjawedyokel
    replied
    Frytrucks hit the nail on the head -- you are creeping up fast to a medium - and thats just starting out - figure in the "velcro effect" and you need to spec a medium duty chassis -

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  • Fyrtrks
    replied
    RKulp:

    It sounds like you are moving towards a medium duty rescue. A 14' body with coffin compartments I think would be just right for you. The other question I would have is are you thinking of how much crew you are going to carry. I think you will NOT be happy with a smaller chassis if you are going to carry crew who will be in SCBA. I have lots of ideas.

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  • rkulp51
    replied
    The one thing we are looking for is having a build in generator with a spare, we also would like to have a 200' cord reel, a portable spare generator, and at LEAST 2 hydraulic reel connections off the rear for preconnected extraction tools. The first right front compartments will be dedicated for EMS equipment. Coffin compartments for extra cribbing and the spare generator. The rear right side should be for elevator rescue equipment, little giant and some extra tools.
    The left side is strictly dedicated to rescue with a compartment for air bag, step chocks, and extinguishers. The scene lights and extra cord reels will be on the left with some extra SCBAs and anything extra we can add. We are hoping to find a 10-14' body with non-walk in compartments.

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  • Nozzle nut 22
    replied
    I can't answer for BEST, but most light rescues/ utility/squads I've seen are on a Ford F series, or a Dodge 5500. Depends on your horsepower needs, and how much weight you need to carry. If your state has a State bid on this type of chassis, you can save some serious dough.

    Secondly, I've been quite impressed with both Hackney's and Rescue 1's designs for this type. They both specialize in rescues and have tons of options. That said, most full line manuf's have this type of rescue in their lineup. Pricewise, I dunno- never priced one out. There are relatively few of these in my area. The only one that comes to mind is East Avon's, which is, I believe, A Pierce- like the rest of their fleet. They seem to like it! It's built on a 4 door p/u chassis. This one is mostly used for support functions, they use the quint for extrication.

    For paramedic use, you'll need power for all the chargeable equipment, and a secure, climate controlled cmpt for the drug box(s). I'd also spec a generator, plenty of scene lights, and at least 2 cord reels.

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  • rkulp51
    replied
    Most the rescues we've had in the past are vehicle, elevator, or cars stuck in water. Nothing major, all of our mutual aid departments run heavy or medium rescues with a quick response time. What is the best type of truck for a light rescue?

    Leave a comment:

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